Spotlight: William Pereira

Courtesy of UC Irvine Special Collections and Archives

Winner of the 1942 Acadamy Award for Best Special Effects, William Pereira (April 25, 1909 – November 13, 1985) also designed some of America’s most iconic examples of futurist architecture, with his heavy stripped down functionalism becoming the symbol of many US institutions and cities. Working with his more prolific film-maker brother Hal Pereira, William Pereira’s talent as an art director translated into a long and prestigious career creating striking and idiosyncratic buildings across the West Coast of America.

(more…)

“Lina Bo Bardi: Together” Opens at The Graham Foundation

Courtesy of

From April 25 through July 25, 2015, the Graham Foundation will host an at its Madlener House showcasing the vision of Italian-Brazilian architect Lina Bo Bardi. Known for her emphasis on social modernism and expressive use of materials, Lina Bo Bardi: Together explores her legacy through her collected works, as well as that of other artists paying homage to the architect and striving to generate new conversations about her designs. Curated by Noemi Blager, the exhibition features photographs, films, and artistic objects reflecting Bo Bardi’s diverse work and immersion in Brazilian culture.

(more…)

Diana Agrest Named One of NPR’s “50 Great Teachers”

via LA Johnson/NPR

Hailed as one of “50 Great Teachers” by NPR, ivy-league architecture professor ’s out-of-the-box teaching methods have brought her to the forefront of studio academia. A testament to her instruction, her students have gone on to attain some of the most prestigious for creative pursuits, including the Pritzker Prize and the MacArthur “genius grant.” With her belief that architects’ work should be informed by multiple disciplines, Agrest has developed a teaching style to push the boundaries of traditional studio culture and challenge her students to explore the built environment through various lenses, particularly film. Read NPR’s full article on Agrest, here.

New London Architecture Unveils Updated 1:2000 Scale Model Of The UK Capital

© Paul Raftery

New London Architecture (NLA), an independent resource and forum for debate about the city’s built environment, have unveiled a new, large-scale interactive model of the capital. Designed to provide a visual history of the city, NLA also intend for it to spark questions about its future. This model replaces an earlier one, which was revealed on the day that it was announced that London’s bid to host the 2012 Olympic Games has been successful. Now, a decade later, the present projection of the city’s built future has been mapped across the model, highlighting the locations of the 263 tall buildings planned or under construction. Visitors are also able to track the route and impact of new transport links, such as HS2 and Crossrail.

(more…)

ACSA to Host Architecture School Webinar Series

Looking for a professional degree, post professional degree, or want to learn the difference? Want to see what a degree in architecture can mean for your future? On April 25, 2015, from 1:00pm – 5:00pm ET, the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) will host the ACSA Creative Futures: Architecture School Webinars Series. The four, 30-minute webinars will cover the following topics:

1:00 – 1:30pm ET: Careers in Architecture
2:00 – 2:30pm ET: Selecting an Undergraduate Program
3:00 – 3:30pm ET: Creativity in Architecture
4:00 – 4:30pm ET: Graduate School in Architecture – How Do I Get in? How Do I Decide Where To Go?

Register for the  here

Title: ACSA Creative Futures: Webinars Series
Website: http://www.acsa-arch.org/programs-events/college-career-events/2015-creative-futures-webinars
Organizers: Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA)
From: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 13:00
Until: Sat, 25 Apr 2015 17:00

Spotlight: James Stirling

Portrait of James Stirling. Ray Williams, photographer.. Image Courtesy of Canadian Centre for Architecture

British architect and Pritzker Laureate Sir James Stirling (22 April 1926 – 25 June 1992) grew up in Liverpool, one of the two industrial powerhouses of the British North West, and began his career subverting the compositional and theoretical ideas behind the Modern Movement. Citing a wide-range of influences – from Colin Rowe, a forefather of Contextualism, to Le Corbusier, from architects of the Italian Renaissance to the Russian Constructivist movement – Stirling forged a unique set of architectural beliefs that manifest themselves in his works. Indeed, his architecture, commonly described as “non-comformist”, consistently caused annoyance in conventional circles.

(more…)

Norman Foster’s Manchester Maggie’s Centre Breaks Ground

© Foster + Partners

After being granted planning permission last yearNorman Foster’s new ’s Cancer Centre in his hometown of  has broken ground. The project is being built at The Christie, one of Europe’s leading cancer centres and the largest single-site centre in Europe. According to Foster + Partners, the new centre will ”provide free practical, emotional and social support for anyone living with cancer as well as their family and friends.” Surrounded by the Centre’s existing, lush gardens designed by Dan Pearson, Foster’s proposed structure aims to tap into the therapeutic qualities of nature by engaging the outdoors.

(more…)

Sign Up Now for Porto Academy 2015

Now for its third year, ‘s famed Faculty of Architecture of the University of Porto () will host ”Porto Academy“ - a week-long summer session of lectures, workshop studios and trips open to students internationally that provides the opportunity to work with the profession’s finest. Planned to take place from July 20th through the 27th, this year’s class will have the chance to work closely with the architects of Pezo von EllrichshausenMenos é Mais and many others. See a complete list of participating architects and find more details, after the break. 

Porto Academy 2015 Guests:

  • Adrien Verschuere of Baukunst
  • Angela Deuber
  • Arno Brandlhuber
  • Cristina Guedes & Francisco Vieira de Campos of Menos é Mais
  • Emilio Tuñón
  • Mansilla Tuñón
  • Guilherme Machado Vaz
  • Inês Vieira da Silva & Miguel Vieira of Sami
  • João Paulo Loureiro
  • Johannes Norlander
  • Ricardo Bak Gordon
  • Sofia Von Ellrichshausen & Mauricio Pezo of
  • Sonja Nagel & Jan Theissen of Amunt
  • Stéphanie Bru & Alexandre Thériot of Bruther
  • Wonne Ickx of Productora
  • Xavier Ros Majó of H arquitectes
© FAUP

Porto Academy will take place in the FAUP’s famous building, designed by Álvaro Siza. You can learn more about the program, here.

What Is The Role Of Hand Drawing In Today’s Architecture?

such as the RIBA Journal’s “Eye Line” contest celebrate the importance of drawing. Image © Tom Noonan

Historically, the ability to draw by hand – both to create precise technical drawings and expressive sketches – has been central to the architecture profession. But, with the release and subsequent popularization of Computer Aided Design (CAD) programs since the early 1980s, the prestige of hand drawing has been under siege. Today, with increasingly sophisticated design and presentation software, from Revit to Rhinoceros, gaining in popularity, the importance of hand drawing has become a topic of heated discussion. Even so, when we published the short article “Hand vs. Computer Drawing: A Student’s Opinion” last week, the number of people offering their thoughts in the comments was far beyond what we expected.

(more…)

Utopia Arkitekter Reinterprets Stockholm’s Vernacular Architecture

Intersection of Tengdahlsgatan and Barnängsgatan. Image Courtesy of

A new housing development called Söderkåkar in Stockholm is aiming to provide a modern interpretation of the area’s 19th century vernacular architecture. Designed by Utopia Arkitekter, the residential structures impose the contemporary emphasis on sustainability and function within the traditional all-wood construction of the past, fitting into the existing infrastructure while maintaining a distinct character.

(more…)

Open Call: Prize Searches for World’s Best Public Library

Book Mountain / MVRDV. Image © Jeroen Musch

Applications are once again open for world’s best public library award. As part of the Danish Agency for Culture‘s Model Program for Public Libraries project, the prize aims to generate new ideas about how the design of public libraries can change to meet the changing needs of today’s society. Considered libraries must “take digital developments and local culture into consideration” and “welcome a diversity of population groups with an open and functional architectural expression in balance with its surroundings and a creative use of IT to improve user experiences.” Learn more about the prize (here) and submit a library, here. Candidates for the “” have until June 15, 2015 to apply.

Spotlight: Jan Kaplický

© jan-kaplicky.com

Radical neofuturist architect Jan Kaplický (18 April 1937 – 14 January 2009) was the son of a sculptor and a botanical illustrator, and appropriately spent his career creating highly sculptural and organic forms. Working with partner Amanda Levete at his suitably named practice Future Systems, Kaplický was catapulted to fame after his sensationally avant-garde 1999 Lord’s Cricket Ground Media Centre and became a truly innovative icon of avant-garde architecture.

(more…)

A Look at China’s “Nail Houses”

© Reuters / Image via The Atlantic

China‘s rapid growth has led to some unusual situations; shocking images of so-called “” continue to circle the internet, depicting defiant homeowners refusing to give up their homes for low compensation in the name of “progress.” Standalone homes, and even some graves, are being surrounded by high-rise development and roadways, as land disputes play out in court. The Atlantic has just published a fascinating round-up of these peculiar situations. You can view them all, here.  

Rem Koolhaas: “Soon, Your House Could Betray You”

Courtesy of Strelka Institute for Media, Architecture, and Design, via Flickr

In the latest of a series of polemical arguments against smart citiesRem Koolhaas has penned perhaps his most complete analysis yet of the role that emerging technologies and the way they are implemented will affect our everyday lives, in an article over at Artforum. Taking on a wide range of issues, Koolhaas goes from criticizing developments in building as a “stealthy infiltration of architecture via its constituent elements” to questioning the commercial motivations of the (non-architects) who are creating these – even at one point implicating his other erstwhile recent interest, the countryside, where he says “a hyper-Cartesian order is being imposed.” Find out more about Koolhaas’ smart city thoughts at Artforum.

(more…)

Open Call: Our Future With/Without Parks 2105

Courtesy of JILA

The Japanese Institute of Landscape Architecture (JILA) will be celebrating its 90th anniversary in May 2015, and is pleased to host an international competition for design proposals envisioning future Tokyo with/without parks in 2105, 90 years from today.

The competition invites students and young practitioners in design, planning, research, and related fields to rethink the raison d’etre of the park, one of the greatest urban inventions for modern society, and to propose innovative visions for future Tokyo with/without parks. Online registrations close April 24, 2015. You can learn more and apply, here.

Is the Golden Ratio Design’s Greatest Hoax?

© Sébastien Bertrand

For more than 150 years, the has been one of the main tenets of design, informing generations of architects, designers, and artists. From Le Corbusier to AppleVitruvius to Da Vinci, the ratio purportedly dictates which forms will be found aesthetically pleasing.  Yet mathematicians and designers have grown skeptical of the practical applications of the Golden Ratio, with Edmund Harriss of the University of Arkansas’ mathematics department putting it at its most simple: “It is certainly not the universal formula behind aesthetic beauty.” Writing for Fast Co. Design, John Brownlee collates sources as diverse as the mathematics department at Stanford University to Richard Meier, laying out the case against what may just be design’s greatest hoax. Read the full article here.

Richard Rogers Restructures Practice Prior To Relocation

The Architects’ Journal have reported that London based practice Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners (RSHP), headed by Richard Rogers, has refined its in-house structure “as the practice continues to implement its long-term succession plan.” The practice, who will move into their new home on level fourteen of the Leadenhall Building following its completion last year, will operate one studio led by Richard Rogers alongside partner Simon Smithson; another by with partner Richard Paul; and a third headed by Ivan Harbour.

(more…)

Spotlight: Peter Behrens

portrait taken by Waldemar Titzenthaler c.1913. (Public domain)

If asked to name buildings by German architect and designer Peter Behrens (14 April 1868 – 27 February 1940), few people would be able to answer with anything other than his AEG Turbine Factory in Berlin. His style was not one that lends itself easily to canonization; indeed, even the Turbine Factory itself is difficult to appreciate without an understanding of its historical context. Despite this, Behrens’ achievements are not to be underestimated, and his importance to the development of architecture might best be understood by looking at three young architects who worked in his studio around 1910: Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe and Walter Gropius.

(more…)