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Christopher Wren: The Latest Architecture and News

Spotlight: Sir Christopher Wren

04:00 - 20 October, 2018
Spotlight: Sir Christopher Wren, Old Royal Navy College, Greenwich. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/nickschooley/6758847925'>Flickr user nickschooley</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>
Old Royal Navy College, Greenwich. Image © Flickr user nickschooley licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Sir Christopher Wren (20 October 1632 – 25 February 1723) is one the most significant architects in British history, and was a recognized astronomer, scholar, and physicist-mathematician. Wren was classically trained at the University of Oxford in physics and engineering where he developed his interest in architecture. He is perhaps most famous for designing London's iconic St Paul's Cathedral, however he is credited with the design of dozens of other churches, government buildings, and hospitals in England. Wren was knighted in 1673.

15 Architects Who Have Been Immortalized on Money

09:30 - 12 May, 2016

In terms of memorialization, being selected to represent your country as the face of a banknote is one of the highest honors you can achieve. Even if electronic transfer seems to be the way of the future, cash remains the reliable standard for exchange of goods and services, so being pasted to the front of a bill guarantees people will see your face on a near-daily basis, ensuring your legacy carries on.

In some countries, the names of the faces even become slang terms for the bills themselves. While “counting Le Corbusiers” doesn’t quite roll off the tongue, a select few architects have still been lucky enough to have been featured on such banknotes in recent history. Read on to find out who the 15 architects immortalized in currency are and what they’re worth.

Forthcoming Exhibition to Examine 'Creation From Catastrophe'

04:00 - 5 January, 2016
Forthcoming Exhibition to Examine 'Creation From Catastrophe', Photomural: 'Reruined Hiroshima' by Arata Isozaki. Image © MOMA
Photomural: 'Reruined Hiroshima' by Arata Isozaki. Image © MOMA

A new exhibition, opening later this month in London, aims to examine the varying ways that cities and communities have been re-imagined in the aftermath of natural, or man-made, disasters. Including work by Yasmeen Lari, ELEMENTAL, OMA, Shigeru Ban, NLÉ, Toyo Ito, Metabolism (Kenzo Tange and Kurokawa Kisho) and Sir Christopher Wren, who redesigned London in the aftermath of the Great Fire of 1666, the exhibition will primarily explore contemporary responses to earthquakes and tsunamis. Posing questions about the fragility of architecture, our relationship to nature, and the power of architects to instigate change, it will ask whether we are facing a paradigm shift in the way that cities and communities recover from destruction.