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Arthur Erickson

Shigeru Ban Architects Reveals Designs for World’s Tallest Hybrid Timber Building in Vancouver

12:00 - 2 June, 2017
Shigeru Ban Architects Reveals Designs for World’s Tallest Hybrid Timber Building in Vancouver, Terrace House (behind) with the Evergreen Building in the foreground. Image Courtesy of PortLiving
Terrace House (behind) with the Evergreen Building in the foreground. Image Courtesy of PortLiving

The design of the world’s tallest hybrid timber building, by Shigeru Ban Architects, has been revealed by Vancouver-based developer PortLiving. Named “Terrace House,” the project will be located in Vancouver’s Coal Harbour neighborhood, adjacent to the landmark-listed Evergreen Building, designed by late architect Arthur Erickson. The design of the “Terrace House” pays tribute to its neighbor, picking up the architectural language of triangular shapes, natural materials, and an abundance of greenery.

Terrace House (behind) with the Evergreen Building in the foreground. Image Courtesy of PortLiving Terrace House model. Image Courtesy of PortLiving Terrace House. Image Courtesy of PortLiving The adjacent Evergreen Building, designed by Arthur Erickson. Image © Flickr user jmv. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 + 5

The Bank of Canada to Receive Controversial Renovation

00:00 - 7 December, 2013
The Bank of Canada to Receive Controversial Renovation, Via Flickr CC User. Used under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>Creative Commons</a>
Via Flickr CC User. Used under Creative Commons

In this interesting report in the Ottawa Citizen, Maria Cook exposes the plan to renovate the Arthur Erickson-designed Bank of Canada Building in Ottawa. The existing building, which features a public atrium complete with a tropical garden, is being extensively remodeled to improve security and building performance, although arguably at great cost to the design. Cook exposes how the bank turned down a prestigious design award in 2011 as it was already at that point privately considering the changes, and explains how its privileged position - related to the government but not controlled by it - effectively means that the bank has nobody it has to answer to who might stop these plans. You can read the full article here.