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3 D Visualization: The Latest Architecture and News

Building the Future with 3D Printing and Real-Time Visualization

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Why is 3D-printed architecture on the rise?

According to a July 2021 report by Grand View Research, the global 3D construction market is set to grow by an incredible 91% between 2021 and 2028. And, why is printed architecture seeing such rapid growth? Firstly, 3D printing is emerging as a possible solution to some of the challenges currently facing architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC) – it can provide affordable housing, shelters for disaster-hit regions, and an answer to sustainable construction. Alongside these, one of the main advantages is the lower construction costs. It’s far easier to calculate the actual volume of construction material required, resulting in less waste.

How to Communicate your Design Intent Through Visualization Styles

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Creating a compelling visualization that communicates your design intent and gets stakeholders on board is no easy feat. While designers have plenty of visualization tools to deploy— from powerful rendering engines to the simplicity of pen and paper — there’s no one-size-fits-all approach to visualization. As your design evolves, you may need multiple renderings at various levels of detail. 

According to Jim Kessler, Director of the Visual Media Group at Jacobs, "When a design is in flux and conversations with the clients are taking place, a photorealistic rendering signals completion of the project and that design changes are no longer possible. Whereas, a non-photorealistic rendering visual suggests a sense of flux and has a huge artistic element to it, which architects gravitate towards."

Layering of Realities: VR, AR, and MR as the Future of Environmental Rendering

Working remotely throughout the past year has accelerated the introduction of new approaches to real-time rendering, and with it, a new necessity was born: how can a person feel physically present inside a space, without actually being there? Ultimately, designers resorted to the virtual world, a vast realm of interactive built environments that can be accessed from the comfort of one's home. Even the tools utilized, such as headsets and goggles, have become more accessible to the vast majority of the public and are being sold at a lower price than they initially were. We have become accustomed to build, modify, and navigate between different environments, going back and forth between what is real and what isn't. Truth is, virtual has become the new normal.

© Matthew Daiter© Matthew Daiter© HighRock© Refik Anadol+ 11

Not Experienced with Rendering? 4 Techniques you Can Use Instead

If there is any word that describes what architectural renders look like nowadays, it would be: impressive. The immense world of rendering has allowed people to engage in virtually-built environments, exploring each space and experiencing what they might hear or feel as they walk by one room to another without being physically present in the project.

The main purpose of a render is to help viewers visualize what the final result of the project will look like. Whether it is for presentation or construction purposes, architects need to translate their visions in a way that helps people who were not involved in the ideation process understand the space and the experiences that come with it. However, not all architects have the proper skills or the time to create such hyper-realistic environments, but with the exceptional quality of visuals being produced nowadays and the rising demand, it has become somewhat mandatory for every project to be presented as a realistic 3D render. So if you are one of those architects who don't have the skills nor time, here are ways you can present your project as an immersive visual experience that translates its identity without resorting to 3D software. 

Off-White Flagship Store Miami. Image © Virgil Abloh + AMOFOUN’TA’SY. Image Courtesy of Public Housing Enterprise J.S.CMuseo Casa Estudio Diego Rivera y Frida Kahlo / Juan O´Gorman / 1931. Image Courtesy of Diego Inzunza - Estudio Rosamente© Apostrophy's+ 11

Meet the Winners of ArchDaily's 2020 Architectural Visualization Awards

After 3 weeks of voting, the results are finally in. The ArchDaily Architectural Visualization Awards has just selected the winners of its first edition. Out of 750 visualizations submitted from all over the world, 6 winning images were chosen, two for each of the following categories: Exterior, Interior, and Conceptual.

Gathering more than 10 000 votes, This awards has come to an end. Presented by IPEVO, Cove.tool, and Concepts, the contest aimed to find the most talented individuals, who inspire us and help us visualize the future of our cities and buildings.

How Light Mix in V-Ray 5 Helps Designers Visualize Architecture

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Using the new Light Mix in V-Ray 5, artists and designers can visualize ideas even faster and more effectively. Now, from just one single render, you have the power to create as many images as you can imagine, at a speed that simply wasn’t possible with earlier versions. 

ArchiPaper: A Surrealist Story About Architecture

The architect Rafał Barnaś, the owner of Unique Vision Studio, a company that specializes in audiovisual arts, architectural visualization, animation, and film, would like to present a trailer of his original project. ArchiPaper is a non-commercial, experimental, short animated film that tells a story about architecture in an unconventional way. The basis and starting point for this work was a physical model of a house designed by BXB Studio. The model was photographed and transformed into an image that teems with life, creating a leisurely-paced, surrealist story immersed in an abstract world, built solely out of paper elements.

Explore Boullée's Unrealized World Through Film "Lux in Tenebris"

Etienne-Louis Boullée, though regarded as one of the most visionary and influential architects in French neoclassicism, saw none of his most extraordinary designs come to life. Throughout the late 1700s Boullée taught, theorized, and practiced architecture in a characteristic style consisting of geometric forms on an enormous scale, an excision of unnecessary ornamentation, and repetition of columns and other similar elements.

Total Chaos 2019: A Space to Learn and Connect Architecture with the 3D Visualization World

Last week, Chaos Group returned to Bulgaria presenting the latest and most innovative within the world of technology and visualization through the Total Chaos 2019 conference. With more than 50 specialists in the field, the event was divided into a series of talks and masterclasses where ArchDaily had the opportunity to participate to cover what was a remarkably enriching instance for all those involved in the world of architecture and the creative industry.

In this second version, Total Chaos provided a shared space for 3D artists and developers to connect and grow, as they explore how topics like AI, real-time ray tracing, light fields and collaborative VR will continue to change professional workflows. 

Twinmotion Joins Unreal Engine Suite to Help Visualization Professionals Better Communicate Their Designs

American video game and software development company Epic Games today welcomes Twinmotion as the latest offering to help visualization professionals in the architecture, construction, urban planning, and landscaping industries better communicate their designs. Powered by Unreal Engine 4, Twinmotion delivers real-time, final-quality rendering through a simple and intuitive interface, with the ability to quickly produce a variety of presentation options including images, panoramas, videos, and virtual reality content.

Olvia Demetriou on the Transition from 2D to 3D with Graphisoft

In a profession as complex as architecture, resistance to change is common. Adopting new technology brings new challenges. Nevertheless, as ​technology moves forward, architecture practices keep pace with it to stay relevant.

Enliven Your Renders with Studio Esinam's Hi-Res Cutouts, Free with ArchDaily Discount Code

© Studio Esinam
© Studio Esinam

Swedish creative firm Studio Esinam has launched a new cutout shop, offering an aid to architects and designers seeking to enliven renders and visualizations. The studio’s products, including these print elevations of iconic landmarks, are made in Sweden with an emphasis on eco-friendly materials.

In celebration of the launch, the studio is offering a mixed pack of 50 diverse, high resolution cuts outs for free, normally priced at £100. Users can gain access to the offer using the discount code “archdaily” on the cutout shop here during the purchasing process.

Explore Le Corbusier's Only South American Project, the Casa Curutchet, With a Virtual Walkthrough

© ARQ+HIS
© ARQ+HIS

One of only two projects completed by Le Corbusier in the Americas—the other being the Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts in Cambridge, Massachusetts—Casa Curutchet is located in La Plata, Argentina. Commissioned by the surgeon Dr. Pedro Domingo Curutchet in 1948, the four-story residence includes a small medical office on the ground floor. The form of the building echoes traditional Latin American courtyard houses while also exemplifying Le Corbusier's five points of architecture.

See Frank Lloyd Wright’s Missing Works Recreated in Photorealistic Renders

With the help of a vast array of software, Spanish architect David Romero has digitally recreated a series of iconic works by Frank Lloyd Wright, two of which have been demolished and a third that was never built. The three projects were based in the United States: the Larkin Administration Building (1903-1950), the Rose Pauson House (1939-1943) and the Trinity Chapel (1958).

"The 3D visualization tools that we have are rarely used to investigate the past architecture and the truth is that there is a huge field to explore,” said Romero in an interview with ArchDaily about his project Hooked on the Past. Romero worked with AutoCAD, 3ds Max, Vray, and Photoshop while restoring black and white photographs, sketches and drawings of these works.

Rose Pauson House  (1939-1943). Image © David RomeroRose Pauson House  (1939-1943). Image © David RomeroTrinity Chapel (1958), an unbuilt project by Frank Lloyd Wright. Image © David RomeroTrinity Chapel (1958), an unbuilt project by Frank Lloyd Wright. Image © David Romero+ 29

PixPlant 3: Create Custom 3D Texture Maps for Rendering

Rendering has become the ultimate tool in the architect’s arsenal for communicating designs directly to clients. But with the seemingly infinite number of real-life material options that exist today, the textures built into rendering programs often fall short. In some cases, one may be able to find appropriate texture maps for their desired materials online, but when experimenting with new materials or unique colors the need for greater customization arises. In the past, perhaps you could attempt to manually create and edit your own texture maps, but this can be a long and arduous process.