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Jeremy Bittermann

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Slabtown 4 / Scott | Edwards Architecture

© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann+ 20

Tripod House / Fieldwork Design & Architecture

© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann+ 18

Portland, United States

Chimneys, Overhangs and Anchors: The Architecture of Climbing Gyms

Climbers embrace their own type of architecture. Between barn doors, mantels and multi-pitch routes, rock climbing and bouldering take on a range of surfaces, materials and structures, whether outside or indoors. Today, more recreational centers and sports facilities are including climbing walls as the sport grows in popularity. As spaces to build strength and unwind, climbing gyms are built as their own interior worlds to explore. 

© Ralph Kämena© Stephane Brugger© Ed Wonsek© John J. Macaulay+ 17

High Desert Residence / Hacker Architects

© Jeremy Bittermann
© Jeremy Bittermann

© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann+ 32

This Pandemic Could Be Our Chance to Change Our Way of Thinking: In Conversation with Kengo Kuma

"We all have to change our way of thinking now. I want to change my architecture to be even more kind to nature," says Kengo Kuma in this Louisiana Channel interview, where he shares his thoughts on the pandemic's impact on architecture and the environment. The architect discusses the collective responsibility towards nature and the importance of designing buildings and cities that allow for and encourage outdoor activities.

Hans Christian Andersen Museum . Image Courtesy of Kengo Kuma and AssociatesMeditation House in The Forest. Image © Erieta AttaliMeditation House in The Forest. Image © Erieta AttaliPortland Japanese Garden Cultural Village. Image © Jeremy Bittermann+ 5

Colby College Harold Alfond Athletics and Recreation Center / Hopkins Architects + Sasaki

© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann© Matthew Arielly© Jeremy Bittermann+ 13

  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  350000 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2020
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  Holophane, Mondo, ASB Squash, Gared, Hussey Seating, +2

Newberg Residence / Cutler Anderson Architects

© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann+ 16

Royal Residence / William / Kaven Architecture

© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann+ 30

Portland, United States

Divine House / Landry Smith Architect

© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann+ 31

Springfield, United States

Glass Link House / Scott | Edwards Architecture

© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann+ 27

Portland, United States

Metro YMCA Workplace Adaptation / Bora Architects + LEVER Architecture

© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann+ 17

Blu Dot Showroom / Waechter Architecture

© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann+ 29

  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  10000 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2020
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  Debenedetto’s Commercial Flooring, Dynaelectric Company, Kittleson & Associates, Portland Millwork, Uncommon Cabinetry

Redfox Commons Renovation / LEVER Architecture

© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann+ 14

Vista North Pearl Condominiums / Bora Architects

© Lincoln Barbour© Lincoln Barbour© Jeremy Bittermann© Jeremy Bittermann+ 15

Architecture Doesn’t Need Rebuilding, It Needs More Thoughtful Critics

In the last few weeks, a number of reactionary architectural commentators have come out of the woodwork to denounce what they see as the currently negative direction of contemporary architecture. They claim that architecture needs to be “rebuilt” or that it is “imploding.” From their indications, architecture is on life-support, taking its last breath. The critique they offer is that contemporary architecture has become (or always was?) insensitive to users, to site conditions, to history—hardly a novel view. Every few years, this kind of frontal assault on the value of contemporary architecture is launched, but the criticisms this time seem especially shallow and misplaced. Surveying the contemporary global architecture scene, I actually feel that we’re in a surprisingly healthy place, if you look beyond the obvious showpieces. We’ve escaped from the overt dogmas of the past, we’ve renewed our focus on issues of the environment and social agency, we’re more concerned than ever with tectonics and how to build with quality. But the perennial critics of contemporary architecture appear not to have examined that deeply, nor that thoughtfully either. And unfortunately the various rebuttals to their critiques, ostensibly in support of modern and experimental architecture, have been ham-handed and poorly argued.

Allied Works’ Clyfford Still Museum is a quieter and more effective building than its neighbor, Daniel Libeskind’s Denver Art Museum. Image © Jeremy Bittermann The Borneo Sporenburg development in Amsterdam demonstrates a streetscape of diverse, integrated modern facades. Image © Flickr CC user Fred (bigiof)BIG’s formally radical 8 House turned out to be socially radical as well, hosting a vital and lively community. Image ©  Jens LindheIn Portland's Pearl District, Modern buildings and parks coexist happily with semi-traditional or historic variants. Image via landarchs.com+ 12

Berkeley Way Academic Office Building / WRNS Studio