All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions

Hiroyuki Oki

BROWSE ALL FROM THIS PHOTOGRAPHER HERE

Son La Ceremony Dome / VTN Architects

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 21

  • Architects: VTN Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 1000.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2017

How to Incorporate Gardens in Home Design

Indoor gardens can contribute important benefits to home living, ranging from aesthetic beauty to improved health and productivity. Research has shown that indoor plants help eliminate indoor air pollutants called Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) that emanate from adhesives, furnishings, clothing, and solvents, and are known to cause illnesses. They also increase subjective perceptions of concentration and satisfaction, as well as objective measures of productivity. Indoor gardens may even reduce energy use and costs because of the reduced need for air circulation. These benefits complement the obvious aesthetic advantages of a well-designed garden, making the indoor garden an attractive residential feature on several fronts.

Courtesy of TAA DESIGN © BK © Rafael Gamo Hydroponic gardening. Image © Needpix user naidokdin + 42

The Concrete House 01 / Ho Khue Architects

© Hiroyuki Oki
© Hiroyuki Oki

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 45

The Art Space Gallery & Restaurant / ShapeUs studio

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 31

Hội An, Vietnam
  • Architects: ShapeUs studio
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 300.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2018

What is Plantscaping?

© Nelson Kon © Quang Dam © Edward Hendricks © Helene Binet + 49

Interior gardens and plants produce many day-to-day benefits, like mood boosting and memory enhancing effects. Interior landscape design, also known as "plantscaping", is much more than the act of bringing plants indoors; it's actually about the strategic placement and selection of plant species within an architectural project to highlight and enhance aspects of spatial design.

Thao Dien House / MM++ architects

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 30

Thảo Điền, Vietnam
  • Architects: MM++ architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 280.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2014

Termitary House / Tropical Space

© Hiroyuki Oki
© Hiroyuki Oki
Thanh Khê District, Vietnam
  • Architects: Tropical Space
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 80.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2014

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 36

36 Architecture Firms from the Global South You Should Know

© Zhou Ruogu/Savoye Photographe
© Zhou Ruogu/Savoye Photographe

Countries that are part of the so-called “global south” have undergone many transformations in their cities and urban contexts in recent years due to the economic and social challenges they face. Urban growth, sustainable development, quality of life and health in emerging cities, and the development of their own cultural identity have been some of the issues that local architecture had to incorporate.

Young architects have understood the importance of making an architecture that is deeply rooted in their own territory while giving this architecture a clear local identity. By generating new typologies and using their own resources and materials, they have presented innovative, site-specific and, above all, solutions with a new fresh focus towards what represents them as creators of this architecture.

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG © Tomás Rodríguez © Fernando Schapochnik © Maurice Ascani + 38

Open Air: Vietnam’s Neo-Traditional Housing Projects

Vietnam has a rich history of traditional architecture. From Rong houses and Trinh Tuong residences to the stilt longhouses of the Ede people, the country has a depth of vernacular construction methods and styles. Today, architects are reinterpreting past building techniques to create neo-traditional homes grounded in contemporary life.

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 13

Cascading House / Nha Dan Architects

© Hiroyuki Oki
© Hiroyuki Oki

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 24

Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
  • Architects: Nha Dan Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 540.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2018

F-Coffee / Wangstudio

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 14

tp. Đồng Hới, Vietnam
  • Architects: Wangstudio
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 217.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2014

Walk-in Showers Without Doors or Curtains: Design Tips and Examples

Because it doesn't include a bathtub, or require doors, screens, or curtains, the walk-in shower often makes bathrooms appear larger, cleaner, and more minimalist. 

However, some precautions must be taken when designing them. Most importantly, the shower cannot be left completely open, even if it appears to be at first glance. Most designs incorporate a tempered glass that prevents water from "bouncing" out of the shower space, subtly closing the area. When this transparent division doesn't have a frame, the appearance of fungi due to accumulation of water and moisture becomes less likely.

Casa de monte / TACO taller de arquitectura contextual. Image © Leo Espinosa Fagerstrom House / Claesson Koivisto Rune. Image © Åke E:son Lindman AUTOHAUS / Matt Fajkus Architecture. Image © Charles Davis Smith Pombal / AZO. Sequeira Arquitectos Associados. Image © Nelson Garrido + 28

Timber House / MM++ architects

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 33

Ciudad Ho Chi Minh (Saigón), Vietnam
  • Architects: MM++ architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 300.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2018

Which Are The Most Used Materials in Social Housing?

Choice of building materials and the inherent continuous reflection about the reach and capabilities of architecture are an interesting alternative way to approach this issue. The materials used in social housing should address local and economic possibilities and the real needs for access to housing in the contemporary context.

In this article, we analyze different projects published on our site to identify some of the predominant materials used in social housing, both for the formation of structures or enclosures. The intentions of this are two-fold: firstly, to create a worldwide panorama of different case studies with different construction styles from a range of geographical locations, and secondly, to provide inspiration and tools to architects to make better social housing.

Below we present 15 social housing projects and their diverse materials and construction styles.

Green Peace Village / Ho Khue Architects

© Hiroyuki Oki
© Hiroyuki Oki

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 24

  • Architects: Ho Khue Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 815.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2019

Villa T House / Time Architects

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 26

Ciudad Ho Chi Minh (Saigón), Vietnam
  • Architects: Time Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 350.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2019