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Mark Alan Hewitt

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What is Beauty in Architecture Today - and Are We Afraid of it?

07:00 - 22 February, 2019
What is Beauty in Architecture Today - and Are We Afraid of it?, Sagrada Familia, Antoni Gaudi. ImageImage via Wikimedia
Sagrada Familia, Antoni Gaudi. ImageImage via Wikimedia

This article was originally published on CommonEdge as "The 'B' Word: How a More Universal Concept of Beauty Can Reshape Architecture."

Why Reusing Buildings Should - and Must - be the Next Big Thing

08:00 - 22 January, 2019
Why Reusing Buildings Should - and Must - be the Next Big Thing, LocHal / Mecanoo. Image © Ossip van Duivenbode
LocHal / Mecanoo. Image © Ossip van Duivenbode

Sustainability awards and standards touted by professional architecture organizations often stop at opening day, failing to take into account the day-to-day energy use of a building. With the current format unlikely to change, how can we rethink the way what sustainability means in architecture today? The first step might be to stop rewarding purpose-built architecture, and look instead to the buildings we already have. This article was originally published on CommonEdge as"Why Reusing Buildings Should be the Next Big Thing."

At the inaugural Rio Conference on the Global Environment in 1992, three facts became abundantly clear: the earth was indeed warming; fossil fuels were no longer a viable source of energy; the built environment would have to adapt to this new reality. That year I published an essay in the Journal of Architectural Education called “Architecture for a Contingent Environment” suggesting that architects join with both naturalists and preservationists to confront this situation.

Modernism: The International Style that Wasn't

09:30 - 20 November, 2018
Modernism: The International Style that Wasn't, Farnsworth House / Mies van der Rohe. Image
Farnsworth House / Mies van der Rohe. Image

This article was originally published on CommonEdge as "Was Modernism Really International? A New History Says No."

I taught architectural history in two schools of architecture during the 1980s and 1990s. Back then it was common for students to get a full three-semester course that began with Antiquity and ended with Modernism, with a nod to later twentieth-century architecture. My text for the middle section was Spiro Kostof’s magisterial History of Architecture: Settings and Rituals. With many centuries to cover, he spent very little effort in dealing with the twentieth century. In the last third of the course, students read texts such as Towards a New Architecture by Le Corbusier and Reyner Banham’s Theory and Design in the First Machine Age. My colleagues and I felt that we offered students a pluralistic and comprehensive review of key developments in the history of the built environment.

Villa Tugendhat / Mies van der Rohe. Image © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Thomas Lewandovski + 15

Robert Venturi and the Difficult Whole: How Architecture's Enfant Terrible Changed Design Forever

09:30 - 4 October, 2018
Robert Venturi and the Difficult Whole: How Architecture's Enfant Terrible Changed Design Forever

This article was originally published on CommonEdge as "Robert Venturi and the Difficult Whole."

Robert Venturi (1925-2018) was the most influential American architect of the last century, though not primarily for his built work, or because of his stature as a designer. He will never stand beside Wright, or Kahn, or even Gehry in that regard. Between 1965 and 1985 he and his collaborator, Denise Scott Brown, changed the way all architects look at buildings, cities, and landscapes, much in the way that Marshall McLuhan, Bob Dylan and Andy Warhol changed our view of art, media, and popular culture during the same period.

I worked with Bob Venturi during my apprenticeship in the 1970s; I also grew up with his books, buildings and paternal influence. He and my father were one year apart; Denise is the same age as my mother.

Forget the Critics: Traditional Architecture Can Still Make a Contemporary Place

09:30 - 26 September, 2018
Forget the Critics: Traditional Architecture Can Still Make a Contemporary Place, Historical building and Yale university campus in downtown New Haven CT, USA / via Shutterstock.com
Historical building and Yale university campus in downtown New Haven CT, USA / via Shutterstock.com

This article was originally published on Common Edge as "Contrary to Architecture's Critical Establishment, Robert A.M. Stern's Yale Colleges Are a Triumph of Placemaking."

In late January I attended a moving memorial service at Yale’s Battell Chapel for Vincent Scully, the man who led me to architecture as a career, and who continues to inspire me as a writer and historian. While there I took the opportunity to tour Benjamin Franklin and Pauli Murray Colleges, Yale’s first new residential colleges in half a century. I came away marveling at the quality of the architecture, and thanking my alma mater for its vision and commitment to enhancing the city and the campus.