Ayenevarzan House / MAAN Architecture Group

Ayenevarzan House / MAAN Architecture Group

Ayenevarzan House / MAAN Architecture Group - Exterior Photography, Brick, FacadeAyenevarzan House / MAAN Architecture Group - Interior Photography, Living Room, Sofa, Table, Chair, ShelvingAyenevarzan House / MAAN Architecture Group - Interior Photography, Bathroom, Door, Sink, BedroomAyenevarzan House / MAAN Architecture Group - Interior Photography, ConcreteAyenevarzan House / MAAN Architecture Group - More Images+ 22

Damavand, Iran
  • Project Associates: Hamid Karami, Sara Mohammadi
  • Supervision: Majid Zamani, Mohadeseh Younesi
  • Construction Manager: Javad Hadavandi
  • Construction Team: Hadi Jahani
  • Structural Consultant: Majid Kolivand
  • Furniture: Rost
  • City: Damavand
  • Country: Iran
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Ayenevarzan House / MAAN Architecture Group - Exterior Photography, Brick, Facade
© Hamid Touri Karami - Hamed Touri Karami

Text description provided by the architects. Ayenevarzan House is the permanent residence of a young couple with a particular cultural and artistic background that differs from the social context of the neighborhood in which the project is located. Initially, this cultural difference and the client's desires and expectations propelled the project to an introverted design; a design that does not consider a building as a separate entity.

Ayenevarzan House / MAAN Architecture Group - Interior Photography, Concrete
© Hamid Touri Karami - Hamed Touri Karami
Ayenevarzan House / MAAN Architecture Group - Image 20 of 27
Second Floor Plan
Ayenevarzan House / MAAN Architecture Group - Interior Photography, Brick, Facade, Windows
© Hamid Touri Karami - Hamed Touri Karami

The project revolves around taking maximum advantage of sunlight and scenic views of the Alborz Mountains, as well as all other potentials that attract us from urban life to rural environments. The site is located at the periphery of the village, the furthest point that construction is allowed. This location required an approach that could create a sense of safety for the inhabitants.

Ayenevarzan House / MAAN Architecture Group - Interior Photography, Living Room, Sofa, Table, Chair, Shelving
© Hamid Touri Karami - Hamed Touri Karami

Based on the measurements of the site, we defined three functional layers for the interior spaces of the house. Two axes on either side of the building created a recessed layer that consists of windows, skylights, and corridors. This strategy minimized the visibility of the interior spaces from the outside and maximized the exposure to daylight and views to the surrounding landscape. The role of these two axes goes beyond providing daylight and view. Horizontally, two axes were defined between the three functional layers of the design. Transparency is the main feature of these axes which made the whole building observable and controllable.

Ayenevarzan House / MAAN Architecture Group - Interior Photography, Bathroom, Door, Sink, Bedroom
© Hamid Touri Karami - Hamed Touri Karami
Ayenevarzan House / MAAN Architecture Group - Image 23 of 27
Section AA

Moreover, the intersection of these axes and interior spaces shaped vertical voids that connect various floors visually, and as a result, enhance the feeling of safety and control. Apart from this visual connection (both vertical and horizontal), the inhabitants can easily cross these axes and move between functional layers. Various elements make this possible in different floors and layers: 

Ayenevarzan House / MAAN Architecture Group - Interior Photography, Windows
© Hamid Touri Karami - Hamed Touri Karami

  • The glass openings between the interior spaces on the ground floor allow access from the dining area and reception room to the kitchen and vice versa.
  • On the first floor, the bridges that connect the balcony to the library and living room, as well as the living room to the bedroom and staircase play a similar role. Connecting inside with outside, these transitional spaces link different functions.
  • The staircase located on the entrance axis allows movement between vertical layers. It also facilitates access to the office on the upper floor without compromising the privacy of the inhabitants.

Ayenevarzan House / MAAN Architecture Group - Exterior Photography, Windows, Facade
© Hamid Touri Karami - Hamed Touri Karami
Ayenevarzan House / MAAN Architecture Group - Image 25 of 27
West Elevation
Ayenevarzan House / MAAN Architecture Group - Interior Photography, Concrete
© Hamid Touri Karami - Hamed Touri Karami

Two balconies, on two different floors and on two different façades, represent two approaches. The central staircase leads to a balcony on the top floor which is enclosed in three sides and has a spectacular view only to Absard fields, and not the surrounding area. It is a gathering space for socializing and holding parties. On the other hand, the balcony on the first floor can be reached after passing the living room and the library. Providing a visual connection to other floors, it is roofed with a cantilever in the western façade and is used as an extension to the library.

Ayenevarzan House / MAAN Architecture Group - Interior Photography, Door, Windows, Chair, Facade
© Hamid Touri Karami - Hamed Touri Karami

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About this office
Cite: "Ayenevarzan House / MAAN Architecture Group" 29 Aug 2021. ArchDaily. Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/967471/ayenevarzan-house-maan-architecture-group> ISSN 0719-8884

© Hamid Touri Karami - Hamed Touri Karami

‘魔方’堡,Ayenevarzan 住宅 / MAAN Architecture Group

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