the world's most visited architecture website
i

Sign up now and start saving and organizing your favorite architecture projects and photos

Sign up now to save and organize your favorite architecture projects

i

Find the most inspiring products for your projects in our Product Catalog.

Find the most inspiring products in our Product Catalog.

i

Get the ArchDaily Chrome Extension and be inspired with every new tab. Install here »

i

All over the world, architects are finding cool ways to re-use run-down old buildings. Click here to see the best in Refurbishment Architecture.

Want to see the coolest refurbishment projects? Click here.

i

Immerse yourself in inspiring buildings with our selection of 360 videos. Click here.

See our immersive, inspiring 360 videos. Click here.

All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions
Navigate articles using your keyboard
  1. ArchDaily
  2. News
  3. Riku Ikegaya Constructs a Series of Nested Spaces in a Berlin Church Designed by Karl Friedrich Schinkel

Riku Ikegaya Constructs a Series of Nested Spaces in a Berlin Church Designed by Karl Friedrich Schinkel

Riku Ikegaya Constructs a Series of Nested Spaces in a Berlin Church Designed by Karl Friedrich Schinkel

Berlin is city in which the past and the present often collide – a phenomenon particularly acute when it comes to the built environment. In this project by Japanese architect and artist Riku Ikegaya, the interior of St. Elisabeth-Kirche (Church of St. Elizabeth)—designed by Karl Friedrich Schinkel—is transformed by means of a structural installation. Consisting of a scale model of Schinkel’s plans for the Rosentaler Vorstadt Church, the artist has composed a "three-dimensional architectural sketch."

Riku Ikegaya Constructs a Series of Nested Spaces in a Berlin Church Designed by Karl Friedrich Schinkel, © Riku Ikegaya
© Riku Ikegaya

This "church in a church" evokes not only the original function of the sacral building as a place of assembly and prayer, but also chronicles historical, cultural, and social change. The original building, heavily damaged during the Second World War, carries traces of the process of destruction, decay, and reconstruction. The temporary, provisional character of the pavilion implies the "unfinished", and the cycle of coming into being and fading away.

© Riku Ikegaya
© Riku Ikegaya
© Riku Ikegaya
© Riku Ikegaya
© Riku Ikegaya
© Riku Ikegaya
© Riku Ikegaya
© Riku Ikegaya
About this author
AD Editorial Team
Author
Cite: AD Editorial Team. "Riku Ikegaya Constructs a Series of Nested Spaces in a Berlin Church Designed by Karl Friedrich Schinkel" 05 Aug 2017. ArchDaily. Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/876738/riku-ikegaya-constructs-a-series-of-nested-spaces-in-a-berlin-church-designed-by-karl-friedrich-schinkel/> ISSN 0719-8884
Read comments

You've started following your first account!

Did you know?

You'll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.