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Olympic Cities: The Netherlands As Game Changer / XML

10:30 - 22 July, 2012
Amsterdam. Photo via Flickr CC User MarcelGermain. Used under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>Creative Commons</a>
Amsterdam. Photo via Flickr CC User MarcelGermain. Used under Creative Commons

As we’ve discussed at length here at ArchDaily, an Olympic Bid is no thing to take on lightly. Our 3-part series on the subject, “How NOT To Host the Olympics,” made very clear that this mega-event is a major urban project with long-term economic, social, and environmental consequences. So, it’s no surprise that Olympic bidders research and strategize well in advance – consider London 2012‘s “Sustainable Olympics” bid or OMA’s perhaps premature interest in Turkey- to ensure, first, that they get the bid and, second, that the Games leave renewal (rather than destruction) in their wake. Architecture, Research, and Urbanism practice, XML, are already taking on the task of preparing its home country, the Netherlands, for its 2028 bid. Their just-released report compares Olympic City bids across the globe – from the 2020 contenders of Madrid, Istanbul, Dohan, and Tokyo to a 2024 contender, South Africa. Interestingly, they’ve noted a cyclical nature of the Games’ socio-economic significance and have thus come up with a 3-prong strategy that will position the Netherlands to spearhead a new Olympic paradigm. You can check out XML’s full Report, well worth a look, after the break...

Serlachius Museum Gösta Extension Competition Proposal / XML

12:00 - 10 July, 2011
Courtesy of XML Architecture Research Urbanism
Courtesy of XML Architecture Research Urbanism

This proposal for the Serlachius Museum Extension in Mänttä, Finland was submitted by XML. The omnipresent landscape provoked the architects to develop a scheme that became a median between the external world of nature and the internal world of art. More information and images on this project after the break.