Video: Bridge of Light

The NY Times published this amazing video of a spectacular art installation on the -San Francisco Bay Bridge. Thousands of computer controlled LED lights can be seen during the night with this fantastic display. Enjoy!

Ray and Dagmar Dolby Regeneration Medicine Building / Rafael Viñoly Architects

© Bruce Damonte

Architects: Rafael Viñoly Architects
Location: 505 Parnassus Avenue, University of San Francisco Medical Center : Dentistry, San Francisco, CA 94131,
Architect In Charge: Rafael Viñoly
Electrical Engineer : Cupertino Electric, Inc
Landscape Architect : Carducci & Associates, Inc
Civil Engineer: Sandis
 Cahd Browning
Structural Engineer (Design): Nabih Youssef Associates Michael Gemmill
Structural Engineer (Of Record): Forell/Elsesser Engineers, Inc
Area: 6364.0 sqm
Year: 2010
Photographs: Bruce Damonte

College Track / Turnbull Griffin Haesloop Architects

© David Wakely

Architects: Turnbull Griffin Haesloop Architects
Location: 4301 3rd Street, San Francisco, CA 94124,
Project Team: Eric Haesloop, Stefan Hastrup, Jerome Christensen
Area: 13800.0 ft2
Year: 2012
Photographs: David Wakely

San Francisco Paves the Road to Zero Waste

© Flickr user Sudheer G.

Approaching zero- is a matter of changing the way our culture thinks about use and reuse.  It’s not an impossible task, and San Francisco is leading the march to establish a feasible means of enacting public policy, structuring programs and educating the public on what it means to be “zero-”.  With a goal set for 2020, the Bay City hopes to keep 100% of its out of .  Mayor Ed Lee estimates that the leading waste management company “Recology” is diverting nearly 80% of trash from to be recycled or turned into compost.  This begins with a public policy that sets a standard and gains traction as citizens embrace the goals of the city.  Support programs reinforce these guidelines that eventually become habits and a cultural response to treating our environment.

Read on after the break for more on San Francisco’s road to “zero-waste”.

Aesop Store in Fillmore Street / NADAAA

© Juliana Sohn

Architects: NADAAA
Location: 2450 Fillmore Street, , CA 94115,
Principal In Charge: Dan Gallagher
Design Principals: Nader Tehrani, Katherine Faulkner
Project Manager: John Chow
Team: Jonathan Palazzolo, Parke MacDowell
Project Year: 2012
Photography: Juliana Sohn

Update: SFMOMA Expansion / Snøhetta

SFMOMA Expansion Aerial Southeast Façade; Courtesy of MIR and Snøhetta

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) has announced further details of its 235,000-square-foot building expansion that will support the museum’s increasing role in city life and the international art community. Designed by Norway-based practice Snøhetta, in collaboration with local firm EHDDthe 10-story concrete structure will compliment SFMOMA’s original, Mario Botta-designed, red-brick museum by offering more free-to-the-public space, expanded education programs and an abundance of flexible performance-based gallery space.

Construction will commence this Summer and is expected to reopen in early 2016.

More after the break…

SFMOMA Expansion Howard St. entrance; Courtesy of MIR and Snøhetta

SFMOMA’s new building will include seven levels dedicated to diverse art experiences and programming spaces, along with three housing enhanced support space for the museum’s operations. It will also offer approximately 130,000 square feet of indoor and outdoor gallery space, as well as nearly 15,000 square feet of art-filled free-access public space, more than doubling SFMOMA’s current capacity for the presentation of art while maintaining a sense of intimacy and connection to the museum’s urban surroundings. Other notable features include:

A large glass-walled gallery (interior view) on ground level with free public access will beckon passersby on Howard Street; rendering: Courtesy of MIR and Snøhetta
  • A large-scale vertical garden located in a new outdoor sculpture terrace on the third floor, which will be the biggest public living wall of native plants in San Francisco.
  • A versatile, double-height “white box” space on the fourth floor equipped with cutting-edge lighting and sound systems that, in tandem with the museum’s upgraded Phyllis
  • Wattis Theater, will open new doors for SFMOMA’s program of live art, and also improve services for school-group tours, film screenings, and special events.
  • State-of-the-art conservation studios on the seventh and eighth floors that will further SFMOMA’s progressive work in the care and interpretation of its growing collections.
  • An environmentally sensitive approach on track to achieve LEED Gold certification, with 15% energy-cost reduction, 30% water-use reduction, and 20% reduction in wastewater generation.
  • A new outdoor terrace on the seventh floor with incredible city views, further integrating the urban indoor/outdoor experience that SFMOMA began in 2009 with the opening of its current rooftop sculpture garden on the fifth floor.
SFMOMA’s new Snøhetta-designed stair (view from Third Street entrance) shown here with previous atrium art installation by Sol LeWitt (inaugural art installation for 2016 reopening to be announced); Rendering: Steelblue
Versatile “white box” space (interior view) on fourth floor of expanded SFMOMA will create new possibilities for live performance and education programs; rendering: Courtesy of MIR and Snøhetta

At the same time, as previously announced, new public spaces and additional public entrances to the building (on Howard and Minna Streets) are designed to increase access and weave the museum more deeply into the neighborhood. A mid-block, street-level pedestrian promenade will open a new route of circulation in the area, enlivening the side streets and offering a pathway between SFMOMA and the Transbay Transit Center currently under construction two blocks east of the museum. Building on the popularity of the museum’s artist commissions in its admission-free atrium, an expansive free-to-access gallery on the ground floor with 25-foot-high glass walls facing Howard Street will now place art—such as Richard Serra’s enormous walk-in spiral sculpture Sequence (2006)—on view to passersby for the first time. This gallery will also feature stepped seating, offering a resting and gathering point for museum tour groups and neighborhood denizens alike.

Sculpture terrace extending from Howard to Minna Streets will be framed on one side by a vibrant vertical garden; rendering: Courtesy of MIR and Snøhetta

“SFMOMA has had a tremendous impact on the economic and cultural vitality of the South of Market neighborhood and the city,” says San Francisco’s District 6 Supervisor Jane Kim. “Even though this area is one of the city’s oldest, in many ways it’s still the freshest, where much of the most dramatic change is happening. The museum’s expanded home in this cultural center will provide even greater public access and support to emerging and established artists as a hub of creativity and international art destination. I look forward to seeing the district grow and evolve even further as SFMOMA’s future takes shape.”

SFMOMA Expansion Night Aerial from Howard St.; Courtesy of MIR and Snøhetta

News via SFMOMA  

Our Ideal City? Seen through the eyes of the Pacific West Coast.

View of via Flickr user Shootyoureyeout

As most New Yorkers know, people are willing to shell out a hefty sum to live in a place where work and play are right around the corner from each other.  But as the article by Ken Layne in The Awl points out, the west coast is a somewhat different place.  UNLIKE New York City, which is crowded with restaurants, bars, and entertainment, as well as offices, design firms and businesses; Silicon Valley, which caters to programmers and tech companies that hire at $100k a year, offers few of the amenities that a nearby town like San Francisco does.  So, Layne concludes, residents are willing to spend hours of their day  making their way into the fortressed office parks of Silicon Valley, flanked by parking lots and boulevards, just to have a reprieve to call home.

SFMoMA: Lebbeus Woods, Architect

, San Francisco Project: Inhabiting the Quake, Quake City, 1995;; © Estate of

SFMoMA will highlight the legacy of Lebbeus Woods in an exhibition that will run from February 16 through June 2, 2013.  It will include 75 works from the past 35 years of his career.  Lebbeus Woods is often categorized as an architect, but always as an artist and visionary.  His career has been filled with imaginative leaps through the concepts of space and form, exploring politics, society, ethics and the human condition.  He was a great influence on architects, designers, filmmakers, writers and artists.  The exhibition will celebrate his untimely death late last year and the breadth of influence that his work had on the art and design community.

Flip House / Fougeron Architecture

© Joe Fletcher

Architects: Fougeron Architecture
Location: , CA,
Year: 2012
Photographs: Joe Fletcher

UPDATE: Complications for Snohetta and Aecom’s Warriors’ Arena

© NBA.com

Complications could be on the rise for Snøhetta and AECOM, who were recently announced as the Golden State Warriors’ architects of choice to design their new sports and entertainment complex on the waterfront. Despite the complications, however, the architects still have time to execute the hoped-for ‘slam dunk’. More information after the break.

Fillmore Park / David Baker + Partners Architects

© Bruce Damonte

Architects: David Baker + Partners Architects
Location: , United States
Design Team: David Baker, Peter MacKenzie, Ian Dunn
Site Area: 26,708 sqf
Landscape Architects: Fletcher Studio
Client: Michael Simmons Property Development
Area: 44,330 sqf
Year: 2012
Photographs: Bruce Damonte

Golden State Warriors Stadium / Snøhetta + AECOM

© NBA.com

The Golden State Warriors recently announced that Snøhetta and AECOM have been selected as the architecture team to design the Warriors’ new sports and entertainment complex on the waterfront. Currently in the final stages of the agreement, the new stadium will be a true centerpiece in hosting the Bay Area’s NBA basketball team, as well as provide a great venue concerts, cultural events and conventions, which are all prominent events the city currently cannot accommodate. More images of the architects’ design can be viewed after the break.

San Francisco Approves Nation’s Tiniest Apartments

An artist’s concept of an apartment. (Panoramic Interests)

has recently approved legislation that will change the city building code to allow for “micro-unit apartments” that includes only 220 square feet of living space. These spaces aim at providing affordable options for singles to live in densely populated urban areas without having to live in the outskirts of the city. Although more of a craze in NY, has actually surpassed New York as the most expensive rental market in the country. More information after the break.

UCSF Mission Bay Parking Structure / WRNS Studio

© Tim Griffith

Architects: WRNS Studio
Location: Mission Bay District, ,
Design Team: Sam Nunes, Kyle Elliott, Claire Axley, Ed Kim, Li Kuo, Mette Shenker, Drew Hastings
Client: University of California
Site Area: 35,000 sqft
Area: 223,602 sqft
Year: 2012
Photographs: Tim Griffith

Design Like You Give a Damn: LIVE! November 12-13

Courtesy of

Taking place November 12-13, the 3rd annual Design Like You Give a Damn: LIVE! event will consist of innovative panel discussions, workshops and the ‘Design Open Mic’ event at the Autodesk Gallery in . Design experts and enthusiasts, industry leaders across disciplines and more come together to address the challenges and lessons learned in humanitarian design and community development. Panel topics address cutting-edge topics and small-group workshops allow participants to gain hands-on knowledge from expert panelists. Put on by Architecture for Humanity, this will be the first year this event is coming to the west coast. For more information, including an itinerary of events, please visit their official website here.

UCSF Mission Bay Block 25A Academic Building Competition Winner / WRNS Studio + Rudolph and Sletten, Inc.

Courtesy of

WRNS Studio and Rudolph and Sletten, Inc., recently won a design/build competition for a new faculty office building at UC ’s Mission Bay campus, which takes cues from the workplaces of high-tech companies. When completed, the 7-story academic office building will house UCSF physicians, faculty, and students in an interdisciplinary, flexible, light-filled environment. Drawing on the principles of the activity-based workplace, the design gives each occupant a “home base” workstation, but also a variety of other spaces for specific work and social activities, ranging from huddle rooms and breakout areas to conference rooms. More images and architects’ description after the break.

‘The Missing 32%’ Event

Courtesy of AIA San Francisco

Taking place at the California College of the Arts in San Fransisco October 13th from 10am-4pm, The Missing 32%,’ features leading professionals from around the country to discuss the role of women in architecture in the 21st century. In the , women represent about 50% of students enrolled in architecture programs, but only 18% of licensed architects are women. Throughout the day, attendees will hear from a broad range of speakers who represent different career paths in the profession ranging from those working for large firms to those choosing to start their own practice. The day will begin with a brief overview of statistics that detail the current leadership structure of architecture firms. The event is presented by AIA San Fransisco. For more information, please visit here.

 

20th Street Residence / SF-OSL

© Bruce Damonte

Architects: SF-OSL
Location: San Francisco, CA,
Architect In Charge: Casper Mork Ulnes, Andreas Tingulstad, Grygoriy Ladigin
Landscape Architects: Flora Grubb
Project Year: 2012
Photographs: Bruce Damonte