HBKU Carnegie Mellon / Legorreta + Legorreta

© Yona Schley

Architects: Legorreta + Legorreta
Location: ,
Project Area: 40000.0 m2
Project Year: 2009
Photographs: Yona Schley

Georgetown University School of Foreign Service / LEGORRETA + LEGORRETA

© Yona Schley

Architects: LEGORRETA + LEGORRETA
Location: Doha,
Architecture: Ricardo Legorreta, Víctor Legorreta, Miguel Almaraz, Adriana Ciklik, Carlos Vargas, Miguel Alatriste, Jana Schulz
Project Area: 50000.0 m2
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Yona Schley

M Castedo Architects Unveils 30-Story Silver Pearl Hotel For Qatar 2022 World Cup

© M Castedo Architects

New York-based firm M Castedo Architects have unveiled their designs for the “Silver Pearl Hotel”, a 1000-room luxury resort and conference facility for the Qatar 2022 World Cup located 1.5 kilometers off the Doha coastline. The $1.6 billion design consists of two 30-story semicircular towers connected by a full height, transparent climate controlled atrium, with unimpeded views of the sea beyond. Access to the hotel will be provided by a four lane elevated causeway over the sea – or alternatively by private yacht or helicopter, say the architects.

Qatar Unveils Designs for Fourth World Cup Stadium

Courtesy of SC

A new, 40,000-seat stadium has been unveiled in preparation for the 2022 FIFA World Cup. Planned for ’s Education City, the home of Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development (QF), the “ Foundation Stadium” is the fourth stadium design that has been released by the Supreme Committee for Delivery & Legacy (SC).

The structure is intended to reference Islamic architecture. Both the interior and exterior will be clad in translucent triangular panels whose color and patterns will shift throughout the day, depending on the position of the sun and influence of artificial illumination which will reflect the events happening from within the stadium.

Read on after the break for more on the design.

Towering Folly: As Qatar’s Death Toll Rises, So Does This Monument

Courtesy of 1week1project

On one of Qatar‘s many World Cup construction sites, another Nepalese worker dies. The worker is not named; their death does not make the news, and work resumes on the site as soon as possible in order to make the 2022 construction deadline. But, in the desert outside Doha, a crane driver solemnly prepares to add one more concrete module to what has rapidly, and tragically, become one of Qatar’s tallest towers.

This is the vision presented by Axel de Stampa and Sylvain Macaux, of the Paris and Santiago-based practice 1week1project, with their “Qatar World Cup Memorial.” Designed as one of their week-long “spontaneous architecture” projects, the monument memorializes each deceased worker in the run-up to the 2022 World Cup.

HBKU Student Center / Legorreta + Legorreta

© Yona Schley

Architects: Legorreta + Legorreta
Location: , Qatar
Design Team: Ricardo Legorreta, Víctor Legorreta, Miguel Almaraz, Adriana Ciklik, Carlos Vargas, Miguel Alatriste
Project Manager: Eduardo Cuéllar
Project Area: 32000.0 m2
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Yona Schley

Qatar Unveils Designs for Third World Cup Stadium

© News

The Supreme Committee for Delivery & Legacy has released images of the third 2022 World Cup Stadium planned for . Revamping an existing 40-year-old stadium at Gulf Cup in Riyadh, the Khalifa International Stadium will be expanded to accommodate 40,000 spectators and equipped with an “innovative cooling technology” that will allow players to compete at a comfortable 26 degrees Celsius.

Read on after the break for more on the design.

UNStudio Appointed to Create Identity for Qatar’s New Metro Network

© Methanoia

Aiming to encourage the use of public transportation as a valid alternative to private transportation, Qatar Rail has appointed UNStudio to design the stations for the first phase of the Greater Doha Metro Network, part of the Qatar Integrated Railway Project (QIRP). With the first phase consisting of 30 stations on 4 metro lines, has created an “Architectural Branding Manual,” a set of design guidelines, architectural details and material outlines which will be used by the design & build firms on each station to ensure the design quality and coherence of the network as a whole.

Martin Filler Admits Mistake in his Critique on Zaha Hadid

Courtesy of ZHA

Last week Zaha Hadid filed a libel lawsuit against critic Martin Filler, after Filler’s review of Rowan Moore’s book “Why We Build: Power and Desire in Architecture” for the New York Review of Books included a scathing section on Hadid. In the article Filler said she had shown “no concern” for the death of construction workers in , where she designed a stadium for the 2022 World Cup. Now, Filler has admitted to a significant error in the article he wrote, The New York Times has reported. In an amendment to his article Filler acknowledges that the quotes he used from Hadid were taken out of context and had “nothing to do” with the Qatar stadium she designed. Read Filler’s full statement in the New York Times article, here.

Qatar Unveils Designs for Second World Cup Stadium

© Neoscape, Inc.

Qatar‘s Supreme Committee for Delivery & Legacy have released images of the latest stadium designed for the 2022 World Cup. Located in Al Khor City, the Al Bayt Stadium will also be surrounded by the new Al Bayt district, which will host retail space and restaurants, as well as landscaped paths for residents to use as horseriding, cycling and jogging tracks. 

The design – billed as “an entirely Qatari concept, reflecting ’s proud history and culture” – is based on the Bayt Al Sha’ar, a black and white tent used traditionally by nomadic people in , which would have been a welcome symbol of hospitality for desert travelers.

Read on after the break for more on the design

Grimshaw Picked to Design Recreational Sports Facilities in Qatar

Courtesy of

The Qatar Olympic Committee has selected Grimshaw as the winner of a competition to design a series of recreational sports facilities across . Grimshaw’s design utilizes a ‘kit-of-parts’ concept to provide adaptable sports centers which suit the different requirements of each site.

The Al Farjan Recreational Sports Facilities will each feature an elevated cafe at the center of the complex, around which football, volleyball, basketball and handball facilities can be added, as well as outdoor children’s playgrounds, public amenities and social areas.

Read on after the break for more on the design.

Doubts Over Qatar’s World Cup Future Causing Tension Among Architects

’ design for the ‘Lusail Iconic Stadium’ which formed part of ’s initial bid.. Image Courtesy of Foster + Partners

An expert on the Middle Eastern construction industry has said that architects working in Qatar are worried about the future of their projects, following the allegations sparked by a Sunday Times report last week of corruption during the country’s 2022 World Cup bid. With many people calling for Qatar to be stripped of the event or for the bidding process to be re-run, there is a chance that Qatar might have to pull the plug on many of its major projects.

Speaking to the Architects’ Journal  Richard Thompson, the Editorial Director of the Middle East Economics Digest, said “A lot of people out here are watching it nervously.”

Read on for more of the comments made by Thompson

Foster and Chipperfield Among Firms Shortlisted for Qatar’s 2022 Centerpiece

’ Previous Design for the ‘Lusail Iconic Stadium’ which formed part of Qatar’s bid for the World Cup. Image Courtesy of

Four firms have been shortlisted to design Qatar‘s Lusail Stadium, the centerpiece for the 2022 FIFA World Cup. Foster + Partners, David Chipperfield Architects, Mossessian & Partners and Mangera Yvars Architects are now competing to design the 80,000 seat stadium which will host the international event alongside Zaha Hadid‘s Al Wakrah stadium and others.

Read on after the break for more on the shortlist

The Indicator: Where the Migrant Workers Are

Architects’ design for al-Wakrah stadium, the main stadium for the 2022 World Cup. Image Courtesy of ZHA

Zaha Hadid’s unfortunate comments in response to worker deaths on construction sites for the 2022 World Cup has made Qatar the eye of a storm that has been raging globally for decades. But it’s not just about Qatar. This has been an issue for as long as there have been construction sites and for as long as poor people have swarmed to them for a chance at a better life.

Construction booms and migrant construction workers have always been two sides of the same equation, both dependent on the other, and, by the twisted logic of the global economy, both are the reason for the other’s existence. No migrant labor pool = no global city = no fantastic architecture, or something to this effect.

The migrant workers are the silent collaborators in global architecture, the invisible, faceless, “untouchables” who make the cost-effective construction of these buildings possible.

Zaha Hadid on Worker Deaths in Qatar: “It’s Not My Duty As an Architect”

Courtesy of ZHA

When The Guardian recently asked Zaha Hadid about the 500 Indians and 382 Nepalese migrant workers who have reportedly died in preparations for the 2022 World Cup in , the architect behind the al-Wakrah stadium responded:

“I have nothing to do with the workers. I think that’s an issue the government – if there’s a problem – should pick up. Hopefully, these things will be resolved.”

Asked whether she was concerned, she then added:

“Yes, but I’m more concerned about the deaths in Iraq as well, so what do I do about that? I’m not taking it lightly but I think it’s for the government to look to take care of. It’s not my duty as an architect to look at it. I cannot do anything about it because I have no power to do anything about it. I think it’s a problem anywhere in the world. But, as I said, I think there are discrepancies all over the world.”

Do you think it’s an architect’s duty to concern him/herself with the rights of the construction workers building their designs? Let us know in the comments below.

Calatrava’s “Sharq Crossing” Planned for Doha Skyline

Courtesy of

Located in , Sharq Crossing is a set of three interconnected bridges spanning almost ten kilometres in the Bay. Designed by the famed architect Santiago Calatrava, the bridge will connect the city’s cultural district in the north to Hamad International Airport and the central business district in West Bay. The bridges, which are designed to accomodate as many as 2,000 vehicles an hour per lane, are also flanked by a series of subsea tunnels to manage and direct the flow of traffic across the bay.

RRC Studio Design Residential & Commercial Expansion for Al Dhakira

Aerial view. Image Courtesy of RRC Studio

Italian Practice RRC Studio has released designs for new residential and commercial quarters in Al Dhakira, Qatar. The design will roughly double the size of the small city, situated 60km outside the capital of Doha, providing new housing blocks, villas, hotels, and a new commercial district.

Winners of the First Old Doha Competition Announced

Courtesy of UK 2013 Year of Culture

Alicja Borkowska and Iris Papadatou from you&me architects have been announced as the UK winners of the inaugural , a competition to redesign part of the old city of Doha in Qatar

Four teams of architects have “worked intensively to develop contextual design responses to address the challenge of regenerating and maintaining the heritage of the city” as part of a British-Qatari collaborative project to “reimagine the urban landscape of old Doha.” As a city defined by its strong heritage, coupled with ambitious plans for the future, the competition aimed to discover ways of regenerating parts of the city centre in a sustainable, yet vibrant, way.