Updated Visuals for One World Trade

View from W Hotel © Port Authority and the Durst Organization

Check out these new renderings of Center from the Port Authority and the Durst Organization.  The images were released to illustrate recent design modifications – such as a treatment for the tower’s first 20 stories and the elimination of the casing around the antenna.   These fresh thirteen visuals offer a look at the tower from perspectives taken around the boroughs and New Jersey.   While these renderings offer a taste of what can be expected,  it is great to physical progress being made and how close we are to a completed tower.

More after the break.

modeLab Patterning Lab: Parametric Patterns and Digital Fabrication Workshop

Courtesy of

modeLab is putting on a two-day workshop August 18-19 on the topic of Parametric Patterns with Grasshopper for Rhinoceros. In a fast-paced and hands-on learning environment, we will experiment with the materiality, craft, and effects of patterning through the distribution of simple and repeatable material (the cut, the fold, and the perforation). Coupling Parametric Design and Digital Fabrication workflows, we will iteratively test our patterns while learning best practices for use of a large-format Laser Cutter. Prototypes will range in material palette (fabric, paper, plastic) based on participants’ interests and will be used to discuss issues of craft, detailing, and the assembly process. For more information, please visit here.

Summer Streets in NYC

via NYC.gov

This past Saturday, we joined in the fifth annual Summer Streets opening weekend.   About 7 miles of city streets were free of cars, allowing scores of bicyclists, runners and pedestrians to occupy the entirety of the pavement.    And, at designated rest stops, participants enjoyed a variety of activities, such as zip lining above Foley Square, rock climbing at Spring Street while hearing how to fix a bike flat from REI volunteers, and Salsa lessons at 51st Street.  Although the streets were full of life with bikes whizzing passed and the pavement buzzing with the sound of runners’ feet,  we were struck by how quiet the streets were without the sounds of cars.   In some spots, it was actually quite eerie to notice which cross street was just passed; for, even the busiest of intersections, typically filled with the all too familiar beeps and screeches, can transform into an entirely different environment with the elimination of cars.   It makes one realize how much of our urban environment has come to be defined and dominated by the vehicle, and makes one wonder the possibilities of what major cities could be like without cars.

More about after the break.

Video: Sigur Rós – Varúð by Ryan McGingley

As part of the ‘Valtari’ Mystery film experiment of the Icelandic band , the video for Varúð was released few days ago. Directed by Ryan McGingley, it shows in a magnificent way as we architects would like to move around.

In his own words… “this piece is my poem to New York City. I wanted to bring a childhood innocence to the streets, through a character whose own light and wonder effects the world around her. I’m always interested in an atmosphere where dreams and reality mingle on equal terms.”

modeLab Intro Lab: Parametric Design with Grasshopper Workshop

Courtesy of

Taking place August 17 from 10am-6pm in , Intro Lab is a one-day workshop put on by modeLab on the topic of Parametric Design with Grasshopper for Rhinoceros. In a fast-paced and hands-on learning environment, we will cover introductions to Algorithmic Design, Computational Geometry, and Parametric Modeling. Additionally, participants will explore concepts such as Object Attributes/Parameters, Part to Whole Relationships, and Data Flow. Emphasis will be placed on consistent organization of data through Lists and Data Trees and best practices for Creative Project Workflow Integration, File Modularity, and Data Visualization. For more information, please visit here.

‘AFTER’ Exhibition / kelly behun | STUDIO

Poured resin side table by after Lynda Benglis. Photo Credit: Alex P. White

R 20th Century is pleased to present AFTER, curated by Kelly Behun and Alex P. White of kelly behun|STUDIO. AFTER, which is on view September 19-October 27, will feature works from kelly behun|STUDIO, one of the most innovative, experimental design studios working today, and R 20th Century, one of the leading galleries for the exhibition of historic and contemporary design.

Designs in the exhibition draw inspiration from methods of sampling, appropriation, and deconstruction and how these ideas relate to postmodern notions of authorship. AFTER acknowledges “reference” in ways that are alternately direct, irreverent, poetic and oblique. More information on the exhibition after the break.

OMA reimagines retail for Coach’s new stores

Coach Omotesando Conceptual ©

American retailer Coach has commissioned OMA to develop a new merchandising system that accommodates Coach’s wide diversity of products while returning to the clarity of Coach’s heritage stores. Since establishing its first workshop 1941, Coach has expanded from a specialist leather atelier to a global distributor of “democratized luxury goods”. This expansion has clouded the clarity of the brand’s original library-like stores, which used a rigorous organizational system that categorically sort projects inside minimal wooden shelving at assisted counters. OMA intends to create a flexible, modular system that embodies the clarity of the original stores and responds to the individual needs of locale.

Continue reading for more. 

Historic Front Street / Cook + Fox Architects

© Cook+Fox Architects

Architect: Cook + Fox Architects, LLP
Location: , NY
Client: Yarrow LLC
Completion: April 2006
Size: 150,000 SF

   

The Media Room / Luca Andrisani

© Adam Chinitz

Architects: Luca Andrisani
Location: New York, NY,
Architect In Charge:
Project Year: 2008
Project Area: 400.0 sqft
Photographs: Adam Chinitz

adAPT NYC Request for Proposals

Courtesy of New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD)

The New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) is inviting developers to submit proposals for a new construction project in Kips Bay, . Developing housing that meets the needs of how New Yorkers live today is critical to the City’s future economic success. Currently, the City’s housing stock is misaligned with the changing demographics of its population. There are 1.8 million one- and two-person households (more than 60 percent of New York City households) and only one million studios and one-bedrooms to meet this housing demand. According to the 2010 Census, the growth rates of the one- and two-person household populations exceed the growth rate of households with three or more people. seeks to create additional choice within New York City’s housing market. Submissions are due no later than September 14 with a pre-submission conference to be held on July 31. To register and for more information, please visit here.

‘A Long-Awaited Tribute: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Usonian House and Pavilion’ Exhibition

Courtesy of The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation (SRGF)

In 1953, six years before the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum opened to the public, two of his structures—a pavilion and model Usonian house—were built on the future site of the museum to house a temporary exhibition displaying the architect’s lifelong work. From July 27, 2012, to February 13, 2013, the Sackler Center for Arts Education at the Guggenheim Museum will present A Long-Awaited Tribute: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Usonian House and Pavilion, an exhibition comprised of selected materials from the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum Archives, highlighting the first Wright buildings erected in . Text Courtesy of: The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation (SRGF). More information on the exhibition after the break.

The Hegeman / Cook + Fox

© Cook+Fox Architects

The Hegeman, designed by Cook + Fox Architects,  is a residential community in Brownsville, that provides housing for low-income and formerly homeless individuals. Developed by Common Ground Community – an innovative non-profit whose mission is to end homelessness – the Hegeman Residence will also provide a range of on-site social services in a model known as supportive housing. For a little bit of context, Brownsville has the highest concentration of NYCHA ( Housing Authority) developments in . A wave of arson in the 1970s destroyed most of the residential structures; Brownsville is just one of the many neighborhoods that were affected. The urban renewal that followed rebuilt many homes and designated them as low-income housing. The community has had many problems since associated with poverty, including crime and drug addiction, as well as low test scores and high truancy rates in the education system.

More after the break.

401 W 14th Street / Cook + Fox Architects

© Cook + Fox. Photo by Rob Cleary during Manhattanhenge

Architect: Cook+Fox Architects
Location: 401 West 14th Street
Client: Taconic Investment Partners
Size: 37,030 sqf
Completion Date: 2008

When we received an amazing photo from our friends at Cook + Fox of their 14th Street project during the Manhattanhenge sunset, we just had to share it with you.  A few years ago, Cook + Fox completed the renovation of this industrial mercantile warehouse situated in the Meatpacking District, turning the badly-weathered structure into viable commercial space (currently the space functions as an Apple retail store).    In order to retain the building’s historic Arts and Crafts character, Cook + Fox worked to replaced every element while preserving the integrity of the whole.

More about the project after the break. 

New York Cityvision Competition Winners

first prize

CityVision recently announced the winners of the New York CityVision Competition. The competition’s goal was to imagine in its future if the manipulation of the urban context and its architectural objects, joined with its inhabitants, is influenced by space and time. With 151 project entries from all five continents and 32 different countries, the jury carefully examined all the entries and then unanimously elected the winners as Eirini Giannakopoulou, Stefano Carera, Hilario Isola, and Matteo Norzi took the first prize. More images and information on the winners after the break.

Manhattanhenge 2012

Manhattanhenge 2012. Photo by John Makely of msnbc.com


 It happens just four times a year (two full suns, and two half-suns) but you can bet New Yorkers make the most of it…Manhattanhenge, that is.  Coined by Neil deGrasse Tyson, the merge of and Stone Henge is used described the phenomen when the sun perfectly aligns with the east-west streets of . “Manhattanhenge comes about because the Sun’s arc has not yet reached these limits (of the solstice), and is on route to them, as we catch a brief glimpse of the setting Sun along the canyons of our narrow streets,” explained Tyson.

Standing far to the east side, the ArchDaily team stood shoulder to shoulder with dozens of anxious observers in Tudor City, an elevated niche that offers a clear shot down 42nd Street and is graced with the beautiful profiles of the Chrysler Building and the Bank of America Tower.   Although the cloudy skies of Thursday only allowed a few red rays to run across the sides of the buildings, Wednesday’s crystal clear evening showed the red fireball in all its glory sitting between the grided streets.

More about Manhattanhenge after the break. 

NY Exhibition opens tonight: SLIPSTREAM / FreelandBuck

Courtesy of FreelandBuck

At least since Leonardo Da Vinci’s first attempts to describe turbulence, architects have been fascinated by the dynamics of flow – perhaps seeking an escape from the solid, stable nature of buildings. Beginning in the 1990′s, architects have used digital software to imbue structures and spaces with some of the same qualities as Da Vinci’s meticulous drawings: fluidity, undulation, instability and temporality. But while software has allowed architects to create novel, dynamic forms digitally, they have struggled to translate these qualities to the physicality of the material world. Slipstream is a physical structure that confronts that leap directly, translating a 2-dimensional digital line drawing into 3-dimensional space.

Alluding to Lebbeus Woods’ 2010 ‘Slipstreaming’ drawings of flow, the installation is a single drawing extruded through the gallery space and cut away to produce a set of interconnected spaces. The linear extrusion acts as both structure and dynamic visual filter, shifting views through the installation and between the spaces it defines. It’s integrity as a structure is masked by both its redundancy and bright coloration. Employing gradients that diffuse and coalesce along its length, color amplifies the undulating lines, establishing cross currents that intensify as visual eddies. Irreducible to form, structure, or graphic, Slipstream is a combined phenomenon of the three.

Don’t miss SLIPSTREAM’s opening tonight, July 12th, from 7-9pm at New York’s Bridge Gallery in the Lower East Side of . Find more details here on the bridgegallery official website. The exhibit will remain on view until August 24th. 

Four Pritzker-Prize winners to submit conceptual designs for new office tower in Manhattan

CCTV/ Partners-in-charge: Rem Koolhaas and Ole Scheeren, designers, David Gianotten, photographed by Iwan Baan

L&L Holding Company, LLC, today announced that four of the world’s most acclaimed architecture firms – Foster + Partners (Lord Norman Foster), Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners (Lord Richard Rogers), OMA (Rem Koolhaas) and Zaha Hadid Architects – are participating this week in the conceptual design phase of its architectural competition for a new office tower to be constructed at 425 Park Avenue in .

In April of this year, L&L Holding invited 11 of the world’s most accomplished architects to express their interest in competing for the commission to design a new tower at 425 Park Avenue. Of those invited, nine firms chose to enter the competition. After careful deliberations, L&L Holding narrowed its list to the four selected firms, each of which is led by a Pritzker Prize-winning architect with extensive international experience and proven expertise in office tower design.

The architects and their teams have prepared and are presenting their conceptual designs this week for a 650,000 square foot tower that will be designed to high L.E.E.D. sustainability standards.

What’s in a Number?

Amanda Burden, Department of City Planning Director, and Mayor Bloomberg examine a mock layout. Photo: Benjamin Chasteen for The Epoch Times

What do you think of the number 300?  Mayor Michael Bloomberg found the number to be just the right amount of square feet necessary to attract a younger demographic to live in the city.   In a city-sponsored competition entitled adAPT NYC, the Department of Housing Preservation and Development is inviting developers to submit proposals for a new construction project in Kips Bay, Manhattan.  The challenge is to design what Bloomberg calls “micro-units”, between 275-250 sqf of living space, complete with a place a kitchen and a bathroom, but no closet is necessary. “Developing housing that matches how New Yorkers live today is critical to the City’s continued growth, future competitiveness and long-term economic success,” said Mayor Bloomberg. “People from all over the world want to live in City, and we must develop a new, scalable housing model that is safe, affordable and innovative to meet their needs.”

More about the competition after the break.