ArchDaily | Broadcasting Architecture Worldwidethe world's most visited architecture website
i

Sign up now and start saving and organizing your favorite architecture projects and photos

i

Find the most inspiring products for your projects in our Product Catalog.

i

Get the ArchDaily Chrome Extension and be inspired with every new tab. Install here »

How to Design School Restrooms for Increased Comfort, Safety and Gender-Inclusivity

09:30 - 15 November, 2016
Northwood Elementary School in the Mercer Island School District. Image © Benjamin Benschneider
Northwood Elementary School in the Mercer Island School District. Image © Benjamin Benschneider

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Why Architects Must Rethink Restroom Design in Schools."

"Gang style" bathrooms, in which rows of stalls are installed opposite rows of wash basins and designated only for males or for females, have been de rigueur in educational facilities for the last hundred years. They involve predictable plumbing, mechanical exhaust, and fixture costs. Short doors and divider walls allow for the passive monitoring of behavior.

Relinquishing this traditional bathroom model is daunting, since individual toilet rooms can significantly increase costs through additional plumbing, ductwork, ventilation, partitions, doors and hardware. These designs many times require additional space, trigger further ADA compliance, and invalidate some USGBC LEED points. Moreover, school districts typically have limited budgets, established facilities, and deep-rooted social practices.

The Next Great Public Spaces Will Be Indoors. Are Architects Prepared?

09:30 - 10 November, 2016
The Next Great Public Spaces Will Be Indoors. Are Architects Prepared?, Oslo Opera House by Snøhetta. Image © Snøhetta
Oslo Opera House by Snøhetta. Image © Snøhetta

This article by Kjetil Trædal Thorsen, the cofounder of Snøhetta, was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Opinion: The Next Great Public Spaces Will Be Indoors."

Maybe with the sole exception of railway stations, public space is generally understood as outdoor space. Whether in the United States or in Europe, especially now with heightened concerns around security, there seems to be this determined way of privatizing everything that is indoors, even as we are increasingly aiming to improve access to public space outdoors. But in the layered systems of our cities of the future, we will need to focus on the public spaces that are found inside buildings—and make them accessible.

Steven Holl on Combining Heritage and Modern Healthcare Design at His Maggie's Centre Barts

09:30 - 8 November, 2016
Steven Holl on Combining Heritage and Modern Healthcare Design at His Maggie's Centre Barts, Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects
Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Q&A: Steven Holl."

For twenty years, Maggie's Centres have been providing cancer treatment to patients within thoughtful, beautiful spaces designed by renowned architects like Rem Koolhaas, Frank Gehry, and Zaha Hadid. Steven Holl's Maggie's Center Barts, located adjacent to St. Bartholomew’s Hospital in central London, is slated to open at the end of this year. While the design has been somewhat controversial in the UK due to its contemporary nature, the cancer care facility incorporates innovative lighting, sustainable materials, and a compact structure in a way that is—according to the architect—entirely complementary to its historical neighbors. We spoke with the renowned architect to learn more about the project and what it has meant to him over the past four years.

Metropolis Magazine Asks: Could Refugees "Save" America’s Rust Belt?

08:00 - 5 November, 2016
Metropolis Magazine Asks: Could Refugees "Save" America’s Rust Belt?, Detroit. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/vandermolen/16036412239/'>Flickr user vandermolen</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-NC 2.0</a>
Detroit. Image © Flickr user vandermolen licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

The "Rust Belt," a region of north central United States, is well known as an area where once thriving industrial cities have declined in economic health and population. As a result, many of the region's cities have been subject to grand proposals that aim to fix these city's problems--but could such schemes also provide a way to intervene in other serious global issues? In a recent article, Metropolis Magazine’s Web Editor and former ArchDaily Managing Editor Vanessa Quirk argues that refugees could reinvigorate such cities, describing how refugees are “boosting American’s legacy cities,” but simultaneously “encountering resistance from residents.”

The World's Most Creative Neighborhoods: Metropolis Names Mumbai, Lagos and Lisbon Among Top Ten

09:31 - 2 October, 2016
The World's Most Creative Neighborhoods: Metropolis Names Mumbai, Lagos and Lisbon Among Top Ten, Avenidas Novas in Lisbon. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lisboa_Avenida_Novas.jpg'>Wikimedia user Cruks</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
Avenidas Novas in Lisbon. Image © Wikimedia user Cruks licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

From Yaba in Lagos to the suburb of Bandra in Mumbai, Metropolis Magazine provides a scenic tour around the world’s “most creative” neighborhoods. Spread across ten rapidly growing cities like Cape Town and Turin, the article provides a comprehensive glimpse into these lesser discussed hubs of creativity.

Copenhagen Named the World's Most Livable City in Metropolis Magazine's 2016 Rankings

09:30 - 11 September, 2016
Copenhagen Named the World's Most Livable City in Metropolis Magazine's 2016 Rankings, Copenhagen. Public domain image <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Vor_Frelsers_Kirke-view8.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a>.
Copenhagen. Public domain image via Wikimedia.

Metropolis Magazine has released their 2016 rankings of the world's most "livable" cities. Acknowledging that what makes a city "livable" can often be subjective, the team at Metropolis emphasizes that in creating the list they "focused on the concerns at Metropolis’ core—housing, transportation, sustainability, and culture." The result of this research was last year's top prize-winner Toronto dropping to the number 9 spot and Copenhagen, which last year took the number 4 spot, jumping to the top. Rounding out the top three are Berlin and Helsinki.

The Consultant Behind the Guggenheim Bilbao on What Makes Good Architecture

09:30 - 10 September, 2016
The Consultant Behind the Guggenheim Bilbao on What Makes Good Architecture, Grace Farms, Connecticut, by  SANAA. One of the projects managed by Andy Klemmer's Paratus Group. Image © Paul Clemence
Grace Farms, Connecticut, by SANAA. One of the projects managed by Andy Klemmer's Paratus Group. Image © Paul Clemence

This article was originally published on Metropolis Magazine as "The Connector."

Andy Klemmer has had a front-seat view of the making of some of the most important pieces of architecture of our time. The president and founder of the consulting firm Paratus Group, Klemmer was an essential part of the team that helped develop the iconic Guggenheim Bilbao. Since then, he’s gone on to consult on the California Academy of Science, the Perez Art Museum Miami, the Kimbell Art Museum expansion, working with architects like Renzo Piano, Herzog & de Meuron, and SANAA (to name a few). By liaising between institutions and their chosen architects, he has unique insight into architecture, its practice, and that essential part of the architecture puzzle: the client.

Morgan Library, New York, by Renzo Piano Building Workshop. One of the projects managed by Andy Klemmer's Paratus Group. Featured in the windows here is the installation "A Certain Slant of Light" by Spencer Finch, which was on display at the library from 2014-2015. Image © Paul Clemence Grace Farms, Connecticut, by  SANAA. One of the projects managed by Andy Klemmer's Paratus Group. Image © Paul Clemence Kimbell Art Museum Expansion, Fort Worth, by Renzo Piano Building Workshop. One of the projects managed by Andy Klemmer's Paratus Group. Image © Paul Clemence Kimbell Art Museum Expansion, Fort Worth, by Renzo Piano Building Workshop. One of the projects managed by Andy Klemmer's Paratus Group. Image © Paul Clemence +8

Why Current Sustainability Metrics Are Short-Changing Non-Western Cities

09:30 - 9 September, 2016
Why Current Sustainability Metrics Are Short-Changing Non-Western Cities, The High Line in New York, by James Corner Field Operations with Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Amenities such as greenways are good for sustainability on a local level, but they have negative effects on a wider level that most cities fail to measure. Image © Iwan Baan, 2014 (Section 3)
The High Line in New York, by James Corner Field Operations with Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Amenities such as greenways are good for sustainability on a local level, but they have negative effects on a wider level that most cities fail to measure. Image © Iwan Baan, 2014 (Section 3)

This article was originally published in Metropolis Magazine as "When It Comes to Sustainability, We're Ranking Our Cities Wrong."

A recent article published in Nature makes a bold claim: we're analyzing our cities completely wrong. Professors David Wachsmuth, Aldana Cohen, and Hillary Angelo argue that, for too long, we have defined sustainability too narrowly, only looking at environmental impact on a neighborhood or city scale rather than a regional or global scale. As a result, we have measured our cities in ways that are inherently biased towards wealthy cities, and completely ignored the negative impacts our so-called "sustainable," post-industrial cities have on the rest of the world.Metropolis editor Vanessa Quirk spoke with Professor Wachsmuth to learn more about the unintended knock-on effects of going "green," the importance of consumption-based carbon counting, and why policy-makers should be more attentive to the effects of "environmental gentrification."

David Adjaye Discusses the Narrative of the National Museum of African American History

09:30 - 30 August, 2016
David Adjaye Discusses the Narrative of the National Museum of African American History, The National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC), which will occupy the last available site on the National Mall, was a challenge for British architect David Adjaye, who is known for designing buildings that are highly referential to their surroundings. Image © Alan Karchmer
The National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC), which will occupy the last available site on the National Mall, was a challenge for British architect David Adjaye, who is known for designing buildings that are highly referential to their surroundings. Image © Alan Karchmer

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Constructing a Narrative."

It’s rare for an architect to have the opportunity to design a building in which symbolism and form are as important as function, if not more so. But this was the task given to David Adjaye when he won the commission to design the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC), which, when it opens in September, will be the final Smithsonian institution to take its place on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Adjaye, whose work is marked for its extreme sensitivity to context, found himself challenged in ways he had never been before. On the occasion of the completion of Adjaye’s Eugene McDermott Award residency at MIT, Metropolis editor Vanessa Quirk spoke with the architect about the new institution, its symbolic significance, and the blurry boundary between monument and museum.

© Alan Karchmer © Alan Karchmer With no dense urban context to draw from, Adjaye eventually found inspiration in the classical vernacular. Indeed, the angle of the building’s facade matches that of the Washington Monument’s pyramid. Image © Alan Karchmer The three tiers of the building organize the spatial experience of the museum into past, present, and future. Image © Alan Karchmer +8

See Paul Rudolph's Orange County Government Center Dismantled Over 4 Seasons With These Photos

09:30 - 23 August, 2016
See Paul Rudolph's Orange County Government Center Dismantled Over 4 Seasons With These Photos, Spring – April 7, 2015. Image © Harlan Erskine
Spring – April 7, 2015. Image © Harlan Erskine

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "A Brutal Dismantling."

As soon as photographer Harlan Erskine discovered the plans to demolish Paul Rudolph's iconic Orange County Government Center in New York, he knew he needed to bear witness to its demise. Beyond admiring the building's dynamic form, the photographer recognized its continued impact on architecture today, particularly noting its influence on Herzog and de Meuron's "Jenga tower."

Visiting on four separate occasions throughout 2015 and 2016, Erskine captured the dismantling of this iconic Brutalist work with stunning severity. See the building's final seasons below.

Winter – March 8, 2015. Image © Harlan Erskine Winter – March 8, 2015. Image © Harlan Erskine Spring – April 7, 2015. Image © Harlan Erskine Spring – May 28, 2016. Image © Harlan Erskine +24

Why the Future of Civic Architecture Lies in Small-Scale Structures

09:30 - 19 August, 2016
Why the Future of Civic Architecture Lies in Small-Scale Structures, Richärd + Bauer’s Arabian Library in Scottsdale, Arizona, won an IIDA Metropolis Smart Environments Award in 2009 for its groundbreaking approach to both sustainability and community needs. The building’s form and rusted-steel cladding were inspired by slot canyons in the Arizona desert. Image Courtesy of Richärd + Bauer
Richärd + Bauer’s Arabian Library in Scottsdale, Arizona, won an IIDA Metropolis Smart Environments Award in 2009 for its groundbreaking approach to both sustainability and community needs. The building’s form and rusted-steel cladding were inspired by slot canyons in the Arizona desert. Image Courtesy of Richärd + Bauer

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Good-bye Grand Structures: The Small-Scale Civic Architecture of Today."

The city hall of my current hometown, Scottsdale, Arizona, gives no hint of any sort of civic function to the boulevard on which it sits. You enter it from the parking lot in back. The only reason I have been there was as part of a team presenting our credentials in a design selection process. My other dealings with government have been online, via mail, or at suburban locations where I have gone to handle such matters as smog tests. I vote by mail.

The big push in American local, state, and federal government is to take everything possible online and off-site and to make whatever remains as minimal and anonymous as possible. The actual operations of government have long taken place in back rooms where politicians and bureaucrats have done the real work. Yet they were often encased in grand structures that gave us a sense of identity and pride in our government while also serving as open sites where we could encounter our civic agents and one another. As a result, we live with a heritage of civic monuments that proclaim our investment in deliberation and democracy, but we build very few, if any, such structures today. Instead, we are looking to get rid of whatever relics of such a history of civic architecture we can—the governor of Illinois would like to sell the James R. Thompson Center, designed by Helmut Jahn in 1982–85, and only the specificity of the grand classical edifices that predate that Postmodern monument prevents other politicians from trying the same. Civic buildings cost money to build and maintain, and their formal spaces sit empty most of the time.

Buckminster Fuller’s Daughter Shares Her Father’s Best Lessons

12:00 - 6 August, 2016
Buckminster Fuller’s Daughter Shares Her Father’s Best Lessons , Montreal 1967 World's Fair, "Man and His World," Buckminster Fuller's Geodesic Dome With Solar Experimental House, 2012. Image © Jade Doskow
Montreal 1967 World's Fair, "Man and His World," Buckminster Fuller's Geodesic Dome With Solar Experimental House, 2012. Image © Jade Doskow

It is the relation between the mind, which Bucky so often talked about, and experience or experiencing that I found to be the key that unlocks his work and inspired my own.

As Buckminster Fuller explained in an 1965 interview with Studs Terkel, his relationship with his daughter was very close. Now, in a previously-unpublished essay written in 1995, the daughter of "Bucky" Allegra Fuller Snyder has shared her father’s best lessons with Metropolis Magazine - explaining how she has adopted her father's approach to learning and understanding the world. Both of them engaged in “experiencing” the living environment, “involving one’s whole self, not being present at, or observing, something, but “doing” that thing.”

Roberto Burle Marx: A Master of Much More than Just Modernist Landscape

10:20 - 3 August, 2016
Roberto Burle Marx: A Master of Much More than Just Modernist Landscape, © Cesar Barreto (left); Burle Marx & Cia. Ltda., Rio de Janeiro. Reproduced with permission. All rights reserved (right)
© Cesar Barreto (left); Burle Marx & Cia. Ltda., Rio de Janeiro. Reproduced with permission. All rights reserved (right)

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Green Thumb."

At any given moment when walking through Roberto Burle Marx: Brazilian Modernist at the Jewish Museum in New York, one may hear a soft rushing of waves, mixed with the murmur of an open-air crowd. A narration in Portuguese, both spoken and sung, will drift breezily in and out. This is the soundscape of Plages, a 2001 video by artist Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster. Shot from an aerial perspective above Copacabana Beach, the film shows the popular Rio de Janeiro waterfront not in its usual sunlit splendor but in the artificially lit nocturne of New Year’s Eve 2000. Celebrators teem in the space between city and ocean, in the moment between one year and the next, moving in dynamic patterns amid the immense designs laid out by Roberto Burle Marx.

Burle Marx’s design for a rooftop garden at the Ministry of Education and Health (1938). Image © Burle Marx & Cia. Ltda., Rio de Janeiro. Reproduced with permission. All rights reserved An untitled work in collage, made in 1967, illustrates Burle Marx’s diverse artistic pursuits. Image Courtesy of Sítio Roberto Burle Marx, Rio de Janeiro A cover design for a 1953 issue of Rio magazine. Burle Marx experimented with new forms in different formats, including works of sculpture, which he often integrated into his landscape designs. Image Courtesy of Sítio Roberto Burle Marx, Rio de Janeiro A model of a sculptural landmark for the unrealized Praça Sérgio Pacheco, City Hall, Uberlândia project (1974). Image © Burle Marx & Cia. Ltda., Rio de Janeiro. Reproduced with permission. All rights reserved +11

Why Islamic Architecture in the United States is Failing American Muslims

09:30 - 21 July, 2016

This essay by Jenine Kotob was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Why Now, More Than Ever, We Need A New Islamic Architecture."

At a time when Muslims find themselves at the center of the nation’s political stage, the topic of Islamic architecture in the United States is more relevant than ever. The American mosque has become a prominent symbol, within which identities, practices, and cultures converge. More often than not, this convergence results in conflicting goals, further resulting in mosques that fail to identify and serve the needs of their diverse constituents.

How WeWork Experiments On Itself to Advance the Field of Office Design

10:23 - 12 July, 2016
How WeWork Experiments On Itself to Advance the Field of Office Design, The potted plants, images of trees on the giant light fixtures from Alex Allen Studio, and even a show tree help people make a connection to nature at work, which creative director Devin Vermeulen says is “proven to make people more creative, less stressed”. Image © Lauren Kallen
The potted plants, images of trees on the giant light fixtures from Alex Allen Studio, and even a show tree help people make a connection to nature at work, which creative director Devin Vermeulen says is “proven to make people more creative, less stressed”. Image © Lauren Kallen

In this article, originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Redefining (and Redesigning) The Way WeWork," Anne Quito visits WeWork's offices in New York to discover how the company is using its own headquarters as the test bed for its future product offering.

In a nondescript building in New York’s Chelsea neighborhood, the global headquarters of WeWork buzzes with creative energy. In just a little over six years, the start-up at the forefront of the coworking-space rental boom has created a $16 billion operation with 50,000 members in 28 cities, with 96 locations announced for this year.

Spread across two and a half floors, the 50,000-square-foot headquarters is the home base for WeWork’s almost-700-strong New York–based staff and serves as a laboratory for its designers.

WeWork’s designers think of the giant staircase that connects three floors of its headquarters as a series of occasional meeting spaces, but also as a kind of indoor park. Image © Lauren Kallen Gathering spaces at WeWork’s headquarters offer a wide range of options in terms of informality and noise levels. The café tends to be fairly energetic. Image © Lauren Kallen The in-house recording studio has a contemporary flair. Image © Lauren Kallen Every WeWork location has some local element; the headquarters has a mural featuring a timeline of New York musicians—from rock and roll to hip-hop—along a narrow corridor. Image © Lauren Kallen +7

How the AIA's Committee on the Environment Can Ensure Its Own Obsolescence

10:30 - 8 July, 2016
How the AIA's Committee on the Environment Can Ensure Its Own Obsolescence, The Edith Green – Wendell Wyatt Federal Building, designed by SERA Architects with Cutler Anderson Architects, the 2016 AIA/Cote Top Ten Plus Winner. Image © Nic Lehoux
The Edith Green – Wendell Wyatt Federal Building, designed by SERA Architects with Cutler Anderson Architects, the 2016 AIA/Cote Top Ten Plus Winner. Image © Nic Lehoux

This article by Kira Gould was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "The Case for COTE's Obsolescence."

Recently the American Institute of Architects Committee on the Environment published, for the first time, a comprehensive report about the winners from the debut year (1997) through 2015: “Lessons from the Leading Edge.” Its lead author, a current COTE advisory board member, Lance Hosey, set out to review two decades of Top Ten winners as a group to see how performance is changing over time, how the winners size up (scale, cost, type), and more.

The result is a compelling report. It reveals that these high-performing projects skew small. That performance gains and metrics, particularly real-time performance metrics, are improving each year. That the leading projects tend to be expensive. On average, they come in at $537 per square foot. “The cost data shows us that we need more compelling examples of lower-cost, higher performance projects,” Hosey says. Clearly, more exemplars at greater scale, type, and cost variation would be beneficial to both the profession and the market.

This Artist is Using Kickstarter to Fund a Floating Bridge to New York's Governor's Island

11:30 - 21 May, 2016

This article was originally published on Metropolis Magazine as "Citizen Bridge, NYC's First Floating Bridge, Reaches Kickstarter Goal."

Governors Island is a small, pedestrian-only island to the south of Manhattan and to the west of Brooklyn. It’s just across from Red Hook, the Brooklyn neighborhood known to many a Manhattanite as the home of New York’s only Ikea. To get there, you have to take the East River Ferry—that’s the only option. No subway, no bus, no rail. But it wasn’t always that way.

Nancy Nowacek is a Red Hook-based artist whose vision, since 2012, has been to create an alternative way to reach this backyard of New York City. She has always had a close relationship with the waterfront, but many, she suggests, do not.  “It’s really hard to get to the water’s edge from most points inland,” she says. “It’s not a part of the New York that the kids in my building...live in, nor many others who live a few miles away geographically, but experientially are a world away.”

"An Alignment of Missions": Why MIT Will Be a Major Player in the 2016 Venice Biennale

10:10 - 16 May, 2016
"An Alignment of Missions": Why MIT Will Be a Major Player in the 2016 Venice Biennale, Brussels Foodmet. A large, mixed-use market building in the immigrant neighborhood of Anderlect, Belgium by ORG Permanent Modernity. The ORG project team includes MIT professor and ORG partner, Alexander D’Hooghe, and MIT alumnus Kobi Rutherberg. Image Courtesy of Filip Dujardin
Brussels Foodmet. A large, mixed-use market building in the immigrant neighborhood of Anderlect, Belgium by ORG Permanent Modernity. The ORG project team includes MIT professor and ORG partner, Alexander D’Hooghe, and MIT alumnus Kobi Rutherberg. Image Courtesy of Filip Dujardin

This interview was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "MIT on the Frontier: An Interview with Hashim Sarkis."

At this year's Biennale, "Reporting from the Front," MIT will have an unusually widespread presence. Ten full-time and visiting faculty, six alumni, and a handful of other MIT-affiliates (many invited by curator Alejandro Aravena himself) will contribute to over 15 installations, including "Rwanda Droneport," a full-scale earthen masonry shell designed by Norman Foster, which will serve as a small airport for drones delivering supplies to inaccessible areas of Rwanda, and "Courtyard House Plug-In," a prefabricated building system designed to be inserted into Beijing's dilapidated courtyard houses. To discuss MIT's significance on the architectural stage today, we spoke with the Dean of MIT's School of Architecture and Planning, Hashim Sarkis, who, it was recently announced, will also serve on the Biennale jury.