Her Majesty’s Pleasure / +tongtong

© Lisa Petrole

Architects: +tongtong
Location: , ON,
Architect In Charge: John Tong
Area: 3000.0 sqm
Photographs: Lisa Petrole

Reflections on the 2014 Venice Biennale

Fundamentals (Central Pavilion): Ceiling. Image © David Levene

Fundamentals, the title of the 2014 Venice Biennale, will close its doors in a matter of days (on the 23rd November). From the moment Rem Koolhaas revealed the title for this year’s Biennale in January 2013, asking national curators to respond directly to the theme of ‘ 1914-2014’, there was an inkling that this Biennale would be in some way special. Having rejected offers to direct the Biennale in the past, the fact that Koolhaas chose to act not only as curator but also thematic co-ordinator of the complete international effort, was significant. This announcement led Peter Eisenman (one of Koolhaas’ earliest tutors and advocates) to state in one interview that “[Rem is] stating his end: the end of [his] career, the end of [his] hegemony, the end of [his] mythology, the end of everything, the end of architecture.”

Harbour Heights Residence / Omar Gandhi Architect

© Greg Richardson Photography

Architects: Omar Gandhi Architect
Location: , NS,
Design Team: Omar Gandhi, Peter Braithwaite, David Greenwell
Year: 2014
Photographs: Greg Richardson Photography

Slate House / Affleck de la Riva architects

© Alexandre Parent

Architects: Affleck de la Riva architects
Location: , QC,
Area: 256.0 sqm
Year: 2010
Photographs: Alexandre Parent

The Canadian Museum for Human Rights: “Failed Memorial and White Elephant”?

Canadian Museum for Human Rights. Image © Aaron Cohen/CMHR-MCDP

In an article for The Walrus, Adele Weder examines Antoine Predock‘s (who was recently made a National Academy Academician) Canadian Museum for Human Rights: a “colossal, twelve-storey mountain of concrete and stone, 120,000 square feet of tempered glass, and 260,000 square feet of floor space.” Early advocates of the museum “felt that was ripe for such a statement piece,” just as Bilbao had been for the Guggenheim. Welder’s explorations are clear and concise, finding all sorts “of paradoxes swirling around the Museum for Human Rights.” Noting that “it’s definitely a kick-ass building, with its aggressive outer form, jagged paths inside, big black slabs of basalt, thick sheets of glass, and the huge metal girders that hold it all together,” Weder argues that it’s position as a “failed memorial and white elephant” may be it’s eventual undoing.

Winners Announced for Architecture for Humanity Vancouver’s “NEXT BIG ONE” Competition

“Modular Landscapes” was designed in response to the 2011 Japanese earthquake. Image Courtesy of Chapter

Architecture for Humanity Vancouver Chapter has unveiled the winners of “NEXT BIG ONE,” an open call for design solutions to high-magnitude earthquake and tsunami events that plague cities around the world. Project teams were challenged to propose a solution that ”can mitigate natural disasters while simultaneously providing community permanence.”

A jury comprised of leading architects and professionals from Architecture Research Office (Stephen Cassell), Perkins + Will (Susan Gushe), Bing Thom Architects (Eileen Keenan), Scott & Scott Architects (David Scott), and the City of Vancouver (Doug Smith) evaluated the projects. Entries were evaluated based on three key criteria: the exemplification of innovation in disaster design, promotion of community resiliency before and after disasters, and compliance with multi-hazard parameters for worst-case disaster scenarios.

Dulwich Residence / NatureHumaine

© Adrien Williams

Architects: NatureHumaine
Location: 371 Avenue Dulwich, Saint-Lambert, QC J4P,
Area: 2845.0 ft2
Year: 2014
Photographs: Adrien Williams

Stephen Hawking Centre at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics / Teeple Architects

© Tom Arban

Architects: Teeple Architects
Location: 31 Caroline Street North, Waterloo, ON N2L 6B9,
Area: 55000.0 ft2
Year: 2011
Photographs: Tom Arban , Scott Norsworthy , Shai Gil

The NSA Muscle: Conversations Exploring Pioneering Projects in Digital Architecture

Screenshot. Image Courtesy of Canadian Centre for Architecture

The NSA Muscle, an interactive inflatable structure built in 2003 that responded to touch and presence by changing its shape, is the latest subject explored in the Canadian Centre for Architecture‘s series on pioneering projects of digital architecture. Joining a roster of influential names including Peter Eisenman, Frank Gehry and Chuck Hoberman, this e-book recounts a conversation between Greg Lynn and the author of the project Kas Oosterhuis of ONL []. The ‘breathing’ structure was covered by a grid of ‘muscles’ that contracted and relaxed in response to external stimulus, combining commercial pneumatics and virtual control technology in new ways to prototype an new kind of interactive architecture.

Discover the story by downloading NSA Muscle for free after the break.

Cossette V7 / Teeple Architects

© Scott Norsworthy

Architects: Teeple Architects
Location: 32 Atlantic Avenue, , ON M6K 1X8,
Area: 45000.0 ft2
Year: 2012
Photographs: Scott Norsworthy , Evan Dion

Port Hope House / Teeple Architects

© Scott Norsworthy

Architects: Teeple Architects
Location: , ON,
Area: 4450.0 ft2
Year: 2012
Photographs: Scott Norsworthy

OS31 Designs Pop-Up Restaurant on a Frozen River

Courtesy of OS31

UK architects OS31 have recently won a competition to design RAW:almond, “the first ever outdoor dining restaurant on a frozen body of water.” The temporary restaurant has set up for business in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada for the last two years, and for 2015 the organizers held an international open competition for the winning design. This year’s design establishes itself as an expressive frame that appears to float across the ice like a frozen jetty. Learn more about the winning proposal after the break.

Paris Block Paris Annex / Gair Williamson Architect + Ankenman Marchand Architects

© Ed White

Architects: Gair Williamson Architect, Ankenman Marchand Architects
Location: 53 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 1G4, Canada
Design Team: Gair Williamson, Jenny Chow, Brian Liston, François Marchand, Julien Leger
Year: 2012
Photographs: Ed White, Courtesy of Gair Williamson Architect +

Ecological Densification Four Townhouses / SHAPE Architecture

Courtesy of

Architects: SHAPE Architecture
Location: , BC, Canada
Project Team: Nick Sully, Hanna Teicher, Matthew Traub
Sustainability: Canadian Green Building Council Sustainable Project Award, Designed to LEED Platinum guidelines, Energuide 86
Year: 2010
Photographs: Courtesy of SHAPE Architecture

Highlands Branch Library / schmidt hammer lassen architects + Marshall Tittemore Architects

© Merle Prosofsky Photography

Architects: Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects, Marshall Tittemore Architects
Location: Edmonton, AB,
Area: 1500.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Merle Prosofsky Photography

AD Round Up: Canadian Architecture to Be Thankful For

The Crystal, extension to the Royal Ontario Museum by Studio Daniel Libeskind. Image © Andrew Rowat

Today marks Canadian Thanksgiving, and to celebrate the occasion we’ve rounded up some of Canada’s best architecture. Our five selections represent five Canadian cities, each with a unique architectural sensibility. We begin in Toronto with the Royal Ontario Museum addition by Studio Daniel Libeskind, a striking intervention using prisms of glass and steel fused to a 102-year-old museum structure; next we go to Montréal for Habitat 67 by Moshe Safdie, an interlocking modular housing project designed for the World Exposition of 1967; to Calgary for Santiago Calatrava‘s understated Peace Bridge, a stunning glass-encased red lightning bolt spanning the city’s widest waterway; then to Winnipeg‘s Old Market Square Stage by emerging firm 5468796 Architecture, a chameleonic performance space wrapped by a mesh curtain of steel cubes; and finally to the outskirts of Vancouver for the Richmond Olympic Oval, a masterpiece of engineering and the centre of attention during the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics. Enjoy, eh.

Li Xiaodong Wins The Inaugural Moriyama RAIC International Prize

The Liyuan Library. Image Courtesy of RAIC / Studio

The Royal Architecture Institute of Canada (RAIC) have announced that Li Xiaodong has been awarded the inaugural Moriyama International Prize, named after esteemed Canadian architect Raymond Moriyama. The prize, which comes with a monetary value of CAD$100,000, has been established to recognise buildings that are judged to be “transformative, inspired as well as inspiring, and emblematic of the human values of respect and inclusiveness.”

The jury deliberated projects submitted from nine countries: Canada, , France, Germany, Israel, Japan, South Korea, the United Kingdom and Tajikistan. According to the citation, the jury was “impressed by the breadth of international interest in the prize and encouraged by the high level of engagement with the aims and objectives of the program revealed in the submissions.” The prize is open to all architects irrespective of nationality and location and seeks to recognise a single work of architecture (as opposed to a life’s work), celebrating buildings in use.

LaSalle Waterworks Building / Affleck de la Riva architects

© Marc Cramer

Architects: Affleck de la Riva architects
Location: Avenue de l’Esplanade, , QC,
Project Manager : Gavin Affleck
Design Architect : Gavin Affleck
Project Team : Steven Leather, Brigitte Boudreau, Alexandre Cassiani, Federico Carbajal, Serge Gascon and Melanie Morris
Area: 450.0 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Marc Cramer, Alexandre Chabot, Affleck de la Riva