GASP! Stage 2 / Room11

© Ben Hosking

Architects: Room11
Location: Derwent Haven, TAS 7010, Australia
Client: Glenorchy City Council
Year: 2011
Photographs: Ben Hosking

GASP! Stage 1 / Room11

© Ben Hosking

Architects: Room11
Location: Derwent Haven, TAS 7010, Australia
Client: Glenorchy City Council
Year: 2011
Photographs: Ben Hosking

Waterloo Youth Center / Collins and Turner

© Richard Glover

Architects: Collins and Turner
Location: NSW, Australia
Area: 252.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Richard Glover, Paul Bradshaw, Josef Nalevansky

Pablo & Rusty’s / Giant Design

© Andrew Worssam

Architects: Giant Design
Location: Castlereagh Street, Sydney NSW 2000,
Associate: Chris Wilks
Director: Ed Kenny
Photographs: Andrew Worssam

Convertible Courtyards House / Christopher Megowan Design

© Nils Koenning

Architects: Christopher Megowan Design
Location: Prahran VIC, Australia
Area: 70 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Nils Koenning

Advanced Engineering Building / Richard Kirk Architect + HASSELL

© Peter Bennetts

Architects: Richard Kirk Architect & HASSELL in joint venture
Location: QLD,
Architect In Charge: Richard Kirk Architect & HASSELL in joint venture
Area: 18,000 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Peter Bennetts

University of Queensland Global Change Institute / HASSELL

© Peter Bennetts

Architects: HASSELL
Location: QLD,
Area: 3865.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Peter Bennetts

Quartette Haus / Bluebottle

© John Gollings

Architects: Bluebottle
Location:
Year: 2011
Photographs: John Gollings, Pia Johnson

Nebula / Andrew Maynard Architects

Courtesy of

Architects: Andrew Maynard Architects
Location: Melbourne,
Area: 62 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Courtesy of Andrew Maynard Architects, Nic Granleese

Point King Residence / HASSELL

© Earl Carter

Architects: HASSELL
Location: Portsea,
Area: 510 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Earl Carter

Sustainable Container Home Selected in Competition for Sydney’s Bondi Beach

Courtesy of Aleš Javůrek

Czech architect Ales Javurek has been awarded first prize in the [AC-CA] Architectural Competition for his design of a two-story, 340 square meter vacation home utilizing shipping containers in Sydney, Australia. The proposal situates the home on the edge of a 1500 square meter hillside to maximize the striking panoramic view of Bondi Beach. By preserving current trees and the slope’s profile, consisting of “three platforms,” the proposal successfully addresses the main brief: to design a contemporary, sustainable vacation house which sensitively fits into its context and considers ’s climate conditions. 

Learn more after the break…

SLASH with Phillips/Pilkington Architects Win the Royal Adelaide Hospital Competition

. Image Courtesy of ODASA

Slash with Phillips/Pilkington Architects have been announced as the winners of the Royal Adelaide Hospital Site International Design Competition, which was open to registered architects and landscape architects from around the world. The competition centred around redesigning the current site, which will be vacated in 2016, in order to create an iconic place within the Greater Riverbank Precinct of Adelaide. See the winning and shortlisted proposals after the break.

House Maher / Tribe Studio

© Katherine Lu

Architects: Tribe Studio
Location: NSW,
Design Team: Hannah Tribe, Tony Tribe, Ben Wollen
Area: 327 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Katherine Lu

Winner of Parramatta Square Design Competition Announced

Courtesy of Parramatta City Council

The Parramatta City Council has announced  firm Johnson Pilton Walker as the unanimous winner of the Parramatta Square Design Competition, beating a shortlist (curated from 73 submissions) that included Sydney based Francis-Jones Morehen Thorp, Bates Smart, and Italian practice Mario Cucinella Architects.

The 53-storey commercial towers will provide up to 140,000 square metres of office space to Parramatta’s central business district as well as act as centrepieces for the future Parramatta Square, in the heart of the CBD.

See images of the towers, which feature a unique floating “public space in the sky,” after the break…

Beeston / Shaun Lockyer Architects

© Scott Burrows

Architects: Shaun Lockyer Architects
Location: QLD, Australia
Architect In Charge:
Design Team: Shaun Lockyer, Shane Marsh
Year: 2013
Photographs: Scott Burrows

Trickett / Shaun Lockyer Architects

© Scott Burrows

Architects: Shaun Lockyer Architects
Location: QLD, Australia
Architect In Charge:
Design Team: Shaun Lockyer, Lucy Hyndman, Jen Lambkin
Year: 2013
Photographs: Scott Burrows

Sydney Greenland Centre Marketing Suite / PTW + LAVA

© Brett Boardman

Architects: LAVA + PTW
Location: 115 Bathurst Street, Sydney,
Year: 2013
Photographs: Brett Boardman, Peter Murphy

Rise of the New Radical Pragmatist

Glenn Murcutt’s designs may be seen as an Australian Regional approach to Modernism. Image © Anthony Browell, Courtesy the Pritzker Prize Committee

Using as her focus, Marissa Looby, in a recent article for the Australian Design Review, argues that the disappearance of architectural styles, combined with the proliferation of various guidelines and building codes, has created a new breed of architect: The New Radical Pragmatist. Her article “The New Radical Pragmatist (On Validation)” is reprinted here. 

The Architectural Review (December, 1955) first published Reyner Banham’s epochal and pivotal article, ‘The New Brutalism’, in which the critic pointed to the rise of a new architectural style. He also described an influx of -isms that were becoming increasingly conspicuous to the discipline, stemming from the then contemporary model of an art historian and their influence on the architectural historian-as-observer of the architectural profession. Banham incisively suggested that any proposition of the term ‘new’ has an unequivocal relationship to the past, so much so that in advocating for a new -ism an architectural theoretician must defend their claim with historic fact.

Ironically, Banham acknowledged that even ‘The New Brutalism’ title derived from The Architectural Review’s analysis of the International Style in the postwar article, ‘The New Empiricism’. He stated: “[the] ability to deal with such fine shades of historical meaning is in itself a measure of our handiness with the historical method today, and the use of phrases of the form ‘The New X-ism’ – where X equals any adjectival root – became commonplace in the early 1950s in fourth year studios and other places where architecture is discussed, rather than practised.”