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Spotlight: Kengo Kuma

Kengo Kuma (born 8th August, 1956) is one of the most significant Japanese figures in contemporary architecture. His reinterpretation of traditional Japanese architectural elements for the 21st century has involved serious innovation in uses of natural materials, new ways of thinking about light and lightness and architecture that enhances rather than dominates. His buildings don't attempt to fade into the surroundings through simple gestures, as some current Japanese work does, but instead his architecture attempts to manipulate traditional elements into statement-making architecture that still draws links with the area its built in. These high-tech remixes of traditional elements and influences have proved popular across Japan and beyond, and his recent works have begun expanding out of Japan to China and the West.

Tanaka Clinic / Akiyoshi Takagi & Associates

© Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano

Dental Clinic in Onomichi / OISHI Masayuki & Associates

© Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Toshinori Tanaka

House in Kitaoji / Torafu Architects

  • Architects: Torafu Architects
  • Location: Kyoto, Kyoto Prefecture, Japan
  • Area: 134.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2012
  • Photographs: Daici Ano

© Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano

House in Komae / Makoto Yamaguchi Design

  • Architects: Makoto Yamaguchi Design
  • Location: Komae, Tokyo, Japan
  • Lighting Design: Luxie, Mayumi Kondo
  • Area: 272.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2007
  • Photographs: Daici Ano

© Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano

Six Essential Materials & The Architects That Love Them

In case you missed it, we’re re-publishing this popular post for your material pleasure. Enjoy!

To celebrate the recent launch of our US product catalog, ArchDaily Materials, we've coupled six iconic architects with what we deem to be their favourite or most frequently used material. From Oscar Neimeyer's sinuous use of concrete to Kengo Kuma's innovative use of wood, which materials define some of the world's best known architects?

Azumaya / Yuko Nagayama & Associates

  • Architects: Yuko Nagayama & Associates
  • Location: Chiba, Chiba Prefecture, Japan
  • Area: 20.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2007
  • Photographs: Daici Ano

© Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano

Urbanprem Minami Aoyama / Yuko Nagayama & Associates

  • Architects: Yuko Nagayama & Associates
  • Location: Aoyama Itchome Station, 2 Chome-1 Motoakasaka, Minato, Tokyo, Japan
  • Area: 144.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2012
  • Photographs: Daici Ano

© Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano

Repository / Jun Igarashi Architects

  • Architects: Jun Igarashi Architects
  • Location: Asahikawa, Hokkaido Prefecture, Japan
  • Area: 279.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2012
  • Photographs: Daici Ano

© Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano

Polyphonic / Jun Igarashi Architects

  • Architects: Jun Igarashi Architects
  • Location: Tokoro District, Hokkaido Prefecture, Japan
  • Area: 128.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2012
  • Photographs: Daici Ano

© Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano