See ArchDaily's exclusive coverage of the 2012 Venice Biennale

ArchDaily at the Venice Biennale 2012

The Corderie at the Arsenale © La Biennale di Venezia
The Corderie at the Arsenale © La Biennale di Venezia

Dear readers,

I’m writing this post from Venezia, , where ArchDaily has been for the past few days and will stay the whole week covering one of the most important architecture events: The 13th Biennale di Venezia.

This year the Architecture Biennale is directed by British architect David Chipperfield, who under the title Common Ground looks  at the meanings of the spaces made by buildings: the political, social, and public realms of which architecture is a part.

The title ‘Common Ground’ also has a strong connotation of the ground between buildings, the spaces of the city. I want projects in the Biennale to look seriously at the meanings of the spaces made by buildings: the political, social, and public realms of which architecture is a part. I do not want to lose the subject of architecture in a morass of sociological, psychological or artistic speculation, but to try to develop the understanding of the distinct contribution that architecture can make in defining the common ground of the city.

The list of participants in this version of the Biennale include world renowned architects like Peter Zumthor, Zaha Hadid, Jean Nouvel, OMA, Alejandro Aravena, Alvaro Siza, Eduardo Soto de Moura, Paulo Mendes da Rocha, and Norman Foster, among others on a  list of 200 offices.

CANCHA – Chilean Soilscapes, the Chile exhibit at the Arsenale. Co curated by Pilar Pinchart and Bernardo Valdes

During these days we’ve had the opportunity to visit and photograph several of the national pavilions and individual exhibits, and interview their curators. This coverage will start to be featured at ArchDaily in our dedicated page starting today. You can also follow us in real time in Facebook, Twitter and Instagram (@archdaily), where we have already uploaded part of our coverage.

Please forward any comments, requests for meetings or  information related to the Biennale to editor@archdaily.com or using our contact form.

More photos after the break.

In The Middle Of The Village / STEINMETZDEMEYER Architectes Urbanistes

© C. Weber

Architects: STEINMETZDEMEYER Architectes Urbanistes
Location: , Luxembourg
Design Team: F. Legros, M. Vereecken, R. Fichant
Project Year: 2009
Photographs: C. Weber

Tube Pavilion / Megabudka

Courtesy of

Designed by Megabudka for Sretenka Design Week in , the key aim of the Tube Pavilion is to demonstrate how a space can be completely transformed with simple means. Created using one hundred lighting, or mirror tubes, at such a density of supports, the roof structure can be reduced to a minimum. If a mirror surface is used in combination with numerous tubes and a thin roof structure, a very interesting effect is created. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Diane Middlebrook Memorial Building / CCS Architecture

Courtesy of

Architects: CCS Architecture
Location: , USA
Project Area: 280 sqm
Photographs: Courtesy of CCS Architecture

Facebook + Frank Gehry

/ via Bloomberg

As we shared earlier, the world’s 28-year old creative technological master will team with 83-year-old starachitect for Facebook’s newest addition to their Menlo Park campus.   The two, although worlds apart in terms of forte, find common ground in the never ending creative process, and the desire to continually push boundaries of the expected and the ordinary.  As we noted in our previous piece, the building will offer a equalized sense of status – no private cubicles or showy corner offices – and encourage a collaborative work environment, admix a warm splash of colors, textures and natural lighting.

Gone from the building will be Gehry’s flashy ways of manipulating sheets of metal, and the resulting superfluous sense of affluence often emitted from these grand structures.  Rather, Gehry’s work for Facebook will offer an ”equalizier”, a massive one story warehouse measuring 420,000 sqf, to house the company’s future 2,800 engineers with the underlying intention of fostering a comfortable environment to allow Facebook to keep getting better.

More about the newest headquarters after the break. 

House V / I + GC [arquitectura]

© Walter Salcedo
This is a fluent volume that breaks away from the ground towards the front, moving down as it turns until it leans fully backwards. This work projects a sense of movement, of a compact mass that has been stretched until it reached its present shape. This is highlighted by the longitudinal windows and the split levels on the top of the facades.

Architects: I + GC [arquitectura]
Location: Funes,
Design Team: Matías Blas Imbern, Agustina González Cid
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Walter Salcedo

Campus 54 / Pelletier de Fontenay

Courtesy of

The Campus 54 office building, designed by Pelletier de Fontenay, aims to create a setting where spaces for leisure, stimulation, relaxation, health, nature and ad hoc encounters would seamlessly blend into the work spaces. At the heart of this project is the notion of the campus. Planned as a multi-tenant office complex for over 4000 employees, the first challenge was to keep an intimate, personal feeling within such a large building. The strategy was to use the scale of the project as an opportunity to create the complexity and variety desired. More images and architects’ description after the break.

The Drexel University Daskalakis Athletic Center / Sasaki Associates

© Halkin Photography

Architects: Sasaki Associates
Location: , PA, USA
Design Team: David Dymecki, Pablo Savid-Buteler, Nancy Freedman, Gerry Gutierrez, Sal Canciello, Dan Dwyer, Mette Aamodt, Elke Berger, Mark Delaney
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Halkin Photography, Robert Benson

Video: Time Lapse of Ron Arad’s 720 Degrees Installation

YouTube Preview Image

On view in the Israel Museum’s Billy Rose Art Garden through September 5, the 720° installation, designed by internationally renowned Israeli artist, architect, and designer Ron Arad, is of monumental proportions. Composed of 5,600 silicon rods suspended from a height of eight meters to form a perfect circle 25 meters in diameter, the silicon cords serve as an empty digital canvas on which works by prominent video artists from and around the world – among them Mat Collishaw, Ori Gersht, Christian Marclay, and David Shrigley – are being screened each evening. Above is a time lapse video of the installation courtesy of Ram Matz, Season of Culture. For more information, please visit here.

 

Robinson-School Linz / Schneider & Lengauer

© Kurt Hoerbst

Architects: Schneider & Lengauer
Location: Linz,
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Kurt Hoerbst

Courtesy of MUS Architects

Tokyo Fashion Museum Proposal / MUS Architects

Designed by MUS Architects…, their proposal for the Tokyo Fashion Museum was recently named the winner of the World Architecture Awards 20+10+X. The whole structure of the building, from the entry yard to the top of the tower has

House KE12 / SoHo Architektur

© Rainer Retzlaff

Architects: SoHo Architektur
Location: Memmingen,
Design Team: Alexander Nägele
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Rainer Retzlaff

See ArchDaily's exclusive coverage of the 2012 Venice Biennale

Venice Biennale 2012: FAT presents ‘The Museum of Copying’

Installation View – Courtesy of

Invited by David Chipperfield, director of the 2012 Venice Architecture Biennale, FAT has contributed an exhibition to the Arsenale titled The Museum of Copying. Responding to the curator’s theme of “Common Ground”, The Museum of Copying explores the idea of the copy in architecture as an important, positive and often surreal phenomenon. The exhibit will be centered around FAT’s installation, “The Villa Rotunda Redux” – a five meter high facsimile of Palladio’s Villa Rotunda that explores the Villa as both a subject and object of architectural copying.

Sam Jacob, a director of FAT said: “There is a history of copies of the Villa Rotunda that have been important staging posts for architectural culture. We hope to extend this history and explore how copying something is, strangely, a way of inventing new forms of architecture. It also seems sweet to return a bastardised form of the Villa to its original home in the Venito.”

Alongside this, the London-based practice will also present San Rocco’s “The Book of Copies”, an investigative look into four architectural doppelgängers (remember this fake Austrian village in China?) , and Ines Weizman’s “Repeat Yourself”. Continue after the break to learn more.

See ArchDaily's exclusive coverage of the 2012 Venice Biennale

Venice Biennale 2012: Estonian exhibition looks into the fate of Linnahall

Linnahall in Tallinn. Photo: Dmitri Bruns (1980)

The Estonian exhibition for the 2012 Venice Architecture Biennale investigates the relationship between time and space by discovering how venues once important have been abandoned and how these tendencies may carry on today and in the future. The exhibition poses a question as its title: “How long is the life of a building?”. The answer is sought based on the example of Linnahall – a dignified Modernist legacy in the heart of Tallinn that only a few decades ago was a renowned and requisite construction, yet is closed today. What’s happening to Linnahall speaks volumes in a more general context as well – similar tendencies are becoming prominent everywhere in the world where multitudes of architectural masterpieces less than 50 years old stand unused.

Continue after the break to learn more.

Ep Es Cremat / Duch-Pizá Architects

© Jaime Sicilia

Architects: Duch-Pizá Architects
Location: , Italy
Project Year: 2008
Photographs: Jaime Sicilia

Staircase for Dogs / 07BEACH

© Hiroyuki Oki / Decon Photo Studio

The staircase for dogs, by 07BEACH, was part of the design method for this simple house in . The architects envisioned not just a comfortable place to live, but a space where daily life will be more fun than usual. Therefore, as a unique design feature, the house represents the client’s affection for their two dogs. More images of the project after the break.

Courtesy of Bauwelt
Courtesy of Bauwelt

Bauwelt Prize 2013 Competition

Open to architects and landscape architects all over the world, as well as individuals and teams, the Bauwelt Prize 2013 applies to all categories of “First Work” – from the interior design of shops and stores to prototypal constructions, from…

Climate Adapted Neighborhood / Tredje Natur

Sankt Kjelds square 01

Copenhagen based architecture firm Tredje Natur recently presented their plans to develop ’s first climate adapted neighborhood, which transforms Saint Kjeld’s Quarter into Copenhagen’s greenest neighborhood. The comprehensive urban development project seeks to demonstrate how the city can be arranged so rainwater can be managed in the streets in a more natural and effective way. Their project offers a wide range of pragmatic strategies to meet the many expectations in the area. As a key principle the architects reclaim 20% of the street area by optimizing the infrastructure and parking lots according to current standard. More images and architects’ description after the break.