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AD Classics: Bolwoning / Dries Kreijkamp

In the quaint Dutch town of Den Bosch, amongst typical brick-clad homes and winding canals, sits the odd community of Bolwoningen: a cluster of globe-shaped stilt houses punctuated with round windows in a sea of wild vegetation. Built in 1984, these oversized “golf balls” are, in fact, homes: an eccentric product of a relatively unknown architectural experiment conducted by a visionary architect, attempting to impose a new morphological dwelling solution, and hoping to generate a new residential typology. Instead, the bizarre neighbourhood remains a secluded, momentary anecdote in architectural history, and today, provides a glimpse into an age of praised radicalism and irrepressible imagination.

More on these “oddballs” after the break.

© Gili Merin © Gili Merin © Gili Merin Courtesy of Bolwoning.com

Secret Operation 610 / Studio Frank Havermans + RAAAF

© Michiel de Cleene © Michiel de Cleene © René de Wit. © Michiel de Cleene

Room On The Roof / i29 interior architects

© Ewout Huibers © Ewout Huibers © Ewout Huibers © Ewout Huibers

Surface As Sculpture: Henry Moore's Brick Reliefs In Rotterdam

In 1954 British sculptor Henry Moore was commissioned to design and install a large wall relief into Joost Boks' new bouwcentrum (Construction Centre) in the Dutch city of Rotterdam. The project, pieced together with approximately 16,000 hand-carved Dutch bricks, stands as the sculptor's only work completed in the humble material. In a short documentary film produced by ARTtube, architectural historian Wouter Vanstiphout narrates the fascinating story behind Wall Relief No.1.

Working drawing, façade detail. Image © The Henry Moore Foundation The wall in-situ - February 2015. Image © James Taylor-Foster Constructing the wall relief. Image © The Henry Moore Foundation The brick wall integrated into the Building Centre, since demolished (1970). Image © The Henry Moore Foundation

Crossoverzaal / NL Architects

The so-called Muziekpaleis is a spectacular endeavour. When we first learnt about the project we could hardly believe its radicality. The project is part of the renovation of the station area. The idea was to construct a music building with 4 halls on top of the existing concert hall Vredenburg. That would mean to partly demolish the Hertzberger Masterpiece! It also would bring together totally different target groups in one building: in addition to the symphony hall, the complex will feature a 2000 people hall dedicated to pop music, a jazz hall, a room for chamber music and the so-called Crossoverzaal. These ‘Biotopes’ will be developed by 4 different architects within the master plan by Architectuurstudio HH. In a way it is a super-sized ‘showcase’ containing stacked ‘buildings’: 3D Urbanism!

Nieuwe Park Rozenburgschool / KCAP Architects&Planners

The ‘Nieuwe Park Rozenburgschool’ is an elementary school in Rotterdam’s quarter Kralingen-Crooswijk with children from various ethnic, cultural and social backgrounds. The school has been spread over two locations within the district. With the extension of one of the locations all school facilities could be united again and help the school function as one institution.

MVRDV and Interior Urbanism: An Interview With Winy Maas

In the late 20th and early 21st centuries, one of the major changes within cities around the world has been the rise of so-called "privately-owned public space," a development which has attracted the attention of many urbanists and is still being widely debated. However, for MONU Magazine, the increasing prevalence (and arguably, acceptance) of such privately owned spaces for public use gives us an opportunity to discuss another aspect of public space: interior urbanism. With the rise of the shopping mall and the increasingly diverse functions required by buildings such as libraries, interior spaces now resemble exterior public spaces more and more.

The following interview is an excerpt from the 21st issue of MONU Magazine, in which MONU's Bernd Upmeyer and Beatriz Ramo interview MVRDV founder Winy Maas, discussing the concept of interior urbanism in the work of MVRDV, in particular in their Rotterdam Markthal, Glass Farm and Book Mountain projects.

Markthal Rotterdam. Image © Nico Saieh Book Mountain in Spijkenisse. Image © Jeroen Musch Book Mountain in Spijkenisse. Image © Jeroen Musch Glass Farm in Schijndel. Image © Jeroen Musch

Theatre Speelhuis / Cepezed Architects

  • Architects: Cepezed Architects
  • Location: Helmond, Netherlands
  • Area: 1997.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2013
  • Photographs: Courtesy of Jannes Linders, Léon van Woerkom

Courtesy of Jannes Linders, Léon van Woerkom Courtesy of Jannes Linders, Léon van Woerkom Courtesy of Jannes Linders, Léon van Woerkom Courtesy of Jannes Linders, Léon van Woerkom

Junky Hotel Amsterdam / Atelier Kempe Thill

  • Architects: Atelier Kempe Thill
  • Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
  • Architect in Charge: André Kempe, Oliver Thill, David van Eck
  • Design Team: Rafael Alencar Saraiva, Marcel Geerdink, Pauline Marcombe, Teun van der Meulen, Anja Mueller, Andrius Raguotis, Ruud Smeelen, Philip Stalbohm, Giorgio Terraneo, Roel van der Zeeuw
  • Area: 730.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2012
  • Photographs: Ulrich Schwarz

© Ulrich Schwarz © Ulrich Schwarz © Ulrich Schwarz © Ulrich Schwarz

Rotterdam Central Station / Benthem Crouwel Architects + MVSA Architects + West 8

Rotterdam Centraal Station is one of the most important transport hubs in The Netherlands. With 110,000 passengers a day the public transport terminal has as many travelers as Amsterdam Airport Schiphol. In addition to the European network of the High Speed Train (HST), Rotterdam Centraal is also connected to the light rail system, RandstadRail. With the advent of both the HST and RandstadRail the number of daily travelers at Rotterdam Centraal is expected to increase to approximately 323,000 by 2025.

Town Hall Borsele / Atelier Kempe Thill

  • Architects: Atelier Kempe Thill
  • Location: Stenevate 10, 4451 KB Heinkenszand, Netherlands
  • Architect in Charge: André Kempe, Oliver Thill, Jan Gerrit Wessels
  • Area: 4387.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2014
  • Photographs: Ulrich Schwarz

© Ulrich Schwarz © Ulrich Schwarz © Ulrich Schwarz © Ulrich Schwarz

Villa SR / Reitsema and Partners Architects

© Ronald Tilleman © Ronald Tilleman © Ronald Tilleman © Ronald Tilleman

Floating Office for Waternet / Attika Architekten

  • Architects: Attika Architekten
  • Location: Noord 4, Papaverweg 54, 1032 KJ Amsterdam, Netherlands
  • Area: 875.0 sqm
  • Photographs: Courtesy of Martine Berendsen, Bart van Hoek, and Attika Architekten

Courtesy of Martine Berendsen, Bart van Hoek, and Attika Architekten Courtesy of Martine Berendsen, Bart van Hoek, and Attika Architekten Courtesy of Martine Berendsen, Bart van Hoek, and Attika Architekten Courtesy of Martine Berendsen, Bart van Hoek, and Attika Architekten

'An Installation In Four Acts' - Exploring Structuralism At Rotterdam's Nieuwe Instituut

Great movements in architecture are usually set in motion by a dull societal ache or as a response to a sudden, unforeseen reorientation of a community at large. The Dutch city of Rotterdam - vast swathes of which were cast into oblivion during the blitz of May 1940 - has been at the forefront of many shifts in approach to the built environment. It is therefore fitting that the latest exhibition at the Nieuwe Instituut (formerly the NAi), simply titled Structuralism, is being held in the city that was recently named Europe’s best.

Furthermore, Dutch Structuralism is a timely subject for Dirk van den Heuvel and the Jaap Bakema Study Centre (JBSC) in Delft to tackle. With major civic buildings like OMA's extension to Rotterdam's City Hall taking shape, it appears that a resurgence of Structuralist formal thought is appearing in the contemporary city. The exhibition seeks to shine a new light on the movement by uncovering drawings, models and texts which profoundly shaped 20th century architectural thinking.

'An Installation In Four Acts' Seminar Space. Image via Het Nieuwe Instituut Structuralism: From 'An Installation In Four Acts' looking towards 'Making Space, Leaving Space'. Image via Het Nieuwe Instituut Structuralism: 'An Installation In Four Acts'. Image via Het Nieuwe Instituut Structuralism: 'An Installation In Four Acts' - the mini-mega furniture. Image via Het Nieuwe Instituut

World’s First Solar Bicycle Lane Opens in Amsterdam

A popular bicycle lane and public road that connects the Amsterdam suburbs of Krommenie and Wormerveer has been impregnated with solar panels, making it the world’s first. The 70-meter stretch, serving 2,000 daily cyclists, was embedded with crystalline silicon solar cells encased within concrete and covered with a translucent layer of tempered glass. It is expected to be extended an additional 100-meters in 2016, providing enough energy to power three households. More information, here

Cedric Price Exhibition Opens In Maastricht

A new exhibition and accompanying digital documentary on Cedric Price, a British architect, writer and educator who had a formative influence on architects such as Renzo Piano, Richard Rogers, and Bernard Tschumi, is open in The Netherlands. The exhibition, curated by members of Bureau Europa, introduces the work of Price by "presenting a cross-section of the elements of his inventive and singular practice" through sketches, project drawings, recorded talks, and first-hand accounts by staff, colleagues and friends. In addition, a series of selected projects present his "innovative models for industry, education, government, tourism, ecology and the house."

Students Head To Finland To Construct Gaudí’s Sagrada Familia From Ice

A team of  from Eindhoven University are set to build a forty metre high model of Antoni Gaudí’s Sagrada Familia out of 'ice'. The project, which follows their completion of the world’s biggest ice dome last year, will be constructed from pykrete and reinforced with wood fibres. The fifty-strong team will head to Finland on the 28th December 2014 to begin construction of the impressive 1:5 scale model, which will be built in only four weeks in order to officially open in the last week of January 2015.

Read about their unique construction method and see photos of the preparatory work after the break.

Expansion of the American School of the Hague / Kraaijvanger

  • Architects: Kraaijvanger
  • Location: Wassenaar, Netherlands
  • Design Team: Kraaijvanger, Rotterdam
  • Team: Hans Goverde, Annemiek Bleumink, Laurence Meulman, Patrick Keijzer, Nol van den Boer
  • Area: 3900.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2013
  • Photographs: Ronald Tilleman

© Ronald Tilleman © Ronald Tilleman © Ronald Tilleman © Ronald Tilleman