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Oryza Nakanoshima Spinning / Naoya Matsumoto Design

© Takeshi Asano © Takeshi Asano © Takeshi Asano © Takeshi Asano

Renhouse / MTKarchitects

  • Architects: MTKarchitects
  • Location: Ina, Nagano Prefecture, Japan
  • Architect in Charge: Akira Metoki
  • Structural Engineer: Hidemasa Nagata
  • Area: 163.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2014
  • Photographs: Yuko Tada

© Yuko Tada © Yuko Tada © Yuko Tada © Yuko Tada

House Ageo / KASA Architects

© Ikunori Yamamoto © Ikunori Yamamoto © Ikunori Yamamoto © Ikunori Yamamoto

Richard Rogers Speaks Out Against Japan's Decision to Scrap Zaha Hadid Stadium

Last month, Japan officially scrapped plans for the controversial Zaha Hadid Architects-designed National Stadium that was intended to be the centerpiece of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics. Since the decision, ZHA released a statement that denied responsibility for the project's ballooning costs, saying the Japan Sport Council (JSC) has been approving the project's design and budget "at every stage."

Now, British architect Richard Rogers, who served on the jury that selected ZHA's stadium design, has joined the conversation claiming Japan has "lost their nerve" and warning that their decision to "start over from zero" will harm Japan's "reputation as a promoter of world-class architectural design."

Read on for Roger's full statement:

NYT Style Magazine Explores the Cultural Reasons Behind the Demolition of Japan's Hotel Okura

About a year ago, it was announced that Hotel Okura, one of Tokyo’s best-known modernist landmarks, was headed for demolition. With the impending demolition date of the hotel, deemed a “beautiful orphan child,” set for this September, an article from T: The New York Times Style Magazine’s upcoming Women’s Fashion issue looks at Japan's "ambivalent — and unsentimental — relationship with its Modernist architecture."

Kamo House / a.un architects

Courtesy of a.un architects Courtesy of a.un architects Courtesy of a.un architects Courtesy of a.un architects

Japan's Abandoned Golf Courses Get Second Life As Solar Farms

With a goal to double the amount of its renewable energy power sources by 2030, Japan has begun to transform abandoned golf courses into massive solar energy plants. As Quartz reports, Kyocera, a company known for its floating solar plants, has started construction on a 23-megawatt solar plant on an old golf course in the Kyoto prefecture (scheduled to open in 2017). The company also plans to break ground on a similar, 92-megawatt plant in the Kagoshima prefecture next year. Pacifico Energy is also jumping on the trend; with the help of GE Energy Financial Services, the company is overseeing two solar plant golf course projects in the Okayama prefecture. The idea is spreading too; plans to transform gold courses into solar fields are underway in New York, Minnesota and other US states as well.

NORD / APOLLO Architects & Associates

  • Architects: APOLLO Architects & Associates
  • Location: Mitaka, Tokyo, Japan
  • Architect in Charge: Satoshi Kurosaki
  • Area: 102.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2015
  • Photographs: Masao Nishikawa

© Masao Nishikawa © Masao Nishikawa © Masao Nishikawa © Masao Nishikawa

Grigio / APOLLO Architects & Associates

© Masao Nishikawa © Masao Nishikawa © Masao Nishikawa © Masao Nishikawa

Rainbow Chapel / Kubo Tsushima Architects

© Koji Fujii / Nacasa and Partners © Koji Fujii / Nacasa and Partners © Koji Fujii / Nacasa and Partners © Koji Fujii / Nacasa and Partners

SOL / Hitoshi Saruta

  • Architects: Hitoshi Saruta
  • Location: Higashicho, Oiso, Naka District, Kanagawa Prefecture 255-0002, Japan
  • Project Year: 2013
  • Photographs: Yasuno Sakata

© Yasuno Sakata © Yasuno Sakata © Yasuno Sakata © Yasuno Sakata

House of Kodaira / KASA Architects

  • Architects: KASA Architects
  • Location: Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan
  • Architect in Charge: Shin Kasakake
  • Construction: Sakagami Corporation.inc
  • Area: 79.0 sqm
  • Photographs: Fumio Araki

© Fumio Araki © Fumio Araki © Fumio Araki © Fumio Araki

Omotesando Keyaki Building / Norihiko Dan and Associates

  • Architects: Norihiko Dan and Associates
  • Location: 5 Chome-1 Jingūmae, Shibuya-ku, Tōkyō-to 150-0001, Japan
  • Architect in Charge: Norihiko Dan ,Norihiko Dan and Associates
  • Design Team: Norihiko Dan ,Nobuaki Yamada ,Eiji Sawano ,Yoshitaka Tenmizu
  • Area: 955.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2013
  • Photographs: Kozo Takayama, Courtesy of Norihiko Dan and Associates, Courtesy of Hugo Boss

Courtesy of Hugo Boss Courtesy of Norihiko Dan and Associates © Kozo Takayama Courtesy of Norihiko Dan and Associates

Maruhiro - Hasami Ceramics Flagship Store / Yusuke Seki

© Takumi Ota © Takumi Ota © Takumi Ota © Takumi Ota

Hotel Pat Inn / Kichi Architectural Design

© Ippei Shinzawa © Ippei Shinzawa © Ippei Shinzawa © Ippei Shinzawa

House in Tama-plaza / Takushu ARAI Architects

  • Architects: Takushu ARAI Architects
  • Location: Yokohama, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan
  • Area: 85.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2014
  • Photographs: Naomi Kurozumi

© Naomi Kurozumi © Naomi Kurozumi © Naomi Kurozumi © Naomi Kurozumi