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Veronica Rudge Green Prize In Urban Design: The Latest Architecture and News

NYC's High Line Wins the 2017 Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design

14:00 - 24 February, 2018
NYC's High Line Wins the 2017 Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design , © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

Eight long and prosperous years have passed since the first part of the New York High Line opened in 2009. As a prominent piece New York's architectural and urban identity, it is no wonder that it has been awarded the Harvard GSD Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design, recognising the ongoing efforts of the Friends of the High Line for their adaptivity to the changing context of the park and their support from the beginning for design excellence.

The jury was particularly inspired by the multidisciplinary project between James Corner Field Operations, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, and Piet Oudolf, spanning the public and private domains as a model of collaborative design. It was also commented on the social and political relevance of the High Line in saving a piece of American history from ruin and interacting through community outreach programs and a wider dissemination program for cities across the US.

Madrid Río Wins Harvard's Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design

12:30 - 10 November, 2015
Madrid Río Wins Harvard's Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design , Courtesy of Harvard GSD
Courtesy of Harvard GSD

Madrid Río, a 120-hectare linear park that transformed the banks of Madrid's Manzanares River, has been awarded the Harvard Graduate School of Design's 12th Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design. Designed by Burgos & Garrido, Porras & La Casta, Rubio & Álvarez-Sala, and West 8, the public park completed its final phase this year - 10 years after being announced as winner of project's international competition.

“The decision to award Madrid Río the Green Prize in Urban Design was motivated by the jury’s desire to highlight the potential for thoughtfully planned and carefully executed mobility infrastructures to transform a city and its region,” commented jury chair Rahul Mehrotra, Professor of Urban Design and Planning at Harvard GSD. “The extent to which the project harnesses the deployment of new infrastructures as an opportunity to repair and regenerate the city through carefully articulated design interventions is particularly valuable within the context of contemporary urbanization globally.”

Courtesy of Harvard GSD Courtesy of Harvard GSD Courtesy of Burgos & Garrido Courtesy of Burgos & Garrido + 20

AD Interviews Eduardo Souto de Moura On His Latest Prize

01:00 - 26 September, 2013
AD Interviews Eduardo Souto de Moura On His Latest Prize, Prtizker laureate Eduardo Souto de Moura accepts the Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design at a ceremony held at the Harvard Graduate School of Design in September. Image © Yusuke Suzuki for Harvard GSD Events
Prtizker laureate Eduardo Souto de Moura accepts the Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design at a ceremony held at the Harvard Graduate School of Design in September. Image © Yusuke Suzuki for Harvard GSD Events

ArchDaily got the chance to briefly speak with Pritzker-prize winning Portuguese architect Eduardo Souto de Moura when he (along with the Porto Metro Authority) received the Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design at the Harvard Graduate School of Design earlier this month. His design for the Metro system in Porto, Portugal garnered high praise from the jury, with member Rahul Mehrotra explaining that the project “shows generosity to the public realm unusual for contemporary infrastructure projects.” Upon receipt of the award, the head of the Porto Metro, João Velez Carvalho, thanked Souto de Moura for his efforts in this “urban revolution” and touted Porto as a destination in which people actively and enthusiastically seek out the architecture of Souto de Moura and fellow Portuguese architect Alvaro Siza.

Souto de Moura spent a few moments with us to describe both the challenges and rewards of working on a project that saw the completion of 60 new stations constructed in 10 years within the sensitive fabric of the city of Porto—a UNESCO World Heritage site. 

ArchDaily: What is your opinion of architecture prizes?

Eduardo Souto de Moura: I won’t be modest, I like describing my opinion about them because the profession is so tough and difficult that is it complicated to achieve a high level of quality. So when you’re awarded a prize it’s like a confirmation of your effort. But the other thing is that a project is not the act of an individual, it’s a collective act. When there’s a prize, the press and the people, the “anonymous people,” go see the project and talk about it, critique it. That’s what gives me the motivation to continue in the profession. And every time it gets more difficult. 

Winners Announced for 2013 Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design

00:00 - 31 August, 2013
Winners Announced for 2013 Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design, Northeastern Urban Integration Project in Medellín, Colombia, Courtesy of Harvard GSD
Northeastern Urban Integration Project in Medellín, Colombia, Courtesy of Harvard GSD

The Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD) has announced the 11th Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design award winners: Eduardo Souto de Moura’s Metro do Porto in Porto, Portugal, and the Northeastern Urban Integration Project in Medellín, Colombia.

When commenting on the significance of the two prize-winning projects, jury member Micahel Sorkin stated: "If there are lessons to be drawn for urban design from Medellín and Porto, I think the broader lesson has to do with the disruption of the segregation of the disciplines in the design field. Historically we have understood that Landscape Architecture sits in one place, Architecture in another, and Urban Design and Planning [in another, with all three disciplines] in constant conflict about their territorial rights. One of the things that is revolutionary about the Medellín project is that distinguishing among the disciplines is no longer possible."

More about the prize-winning projects, courtesy of the GSD: