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Terry Farrell: The Latest Architecture and News

The 30 Most Influential Architects in London

09:00 - 15 October, 2018
The 30 Most Influential Architects in London,  by Hufton + Crow
by Hufton + Crow

As a “global capital,” London is home to some of the world’s most influential people, architects included. This fact has recently been laid bare by the London Evening Standard newspaper, whose list of the 1000 most influential Londoners features 30 architects, big and small, who use the city as a base for producing some of the world’s most celebrated architectural works.

Below, we have rounded up the 30 most influential architects in London, complete with examples of the architectural works which have put them on the city and world map.

 by Nigel Young  by Rob Parrish  by Darren Bradley  by Iwan Baan + 31

Why Postmodernism's New-Found Popularity Is All About Looking Forward, Not Back

09:30 - 15 December, 2017
Why Postmodernism's New-Found Popularity Is All About Looking Forward, Not Back, Team Disney Building / Arata Isozaki. Image © Xinai Liang
Team Disney Building / Arata Isozaki. Image © Xinai Liang

Postmodernism is back, it seems, and the architectural establishment has mixed feelings about it. This revival has been brewing for a while. In 2014, Metropolis Magazine created a “watchlist” of the best postmodernist buildings in New York that had been overlooked by the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission, and were therefore at risk of being altered or destroyed. Last year, the listing of James Stirling’s One Poultry in the City of London kicked off a discussion about the value of Britain’s postmodernist buildings from the 1980s, as they reach an age when they are eligible for listing for preservation by Historic England. More recently Sean Griffiths, co-founder of the former architectural practice FAT, warned against a postmodernist revival, arguing that a style that thrived on irony could be dangerous in an era of Donald Trump, when satire seems to no longer be an effective political tool. The debate looks set to continue as, next year, London’s John Soane museum is planning an exhibition devoted to postmodernism.

Les Espaces d'Abraxas / Ricardo Bofill. Image © RBTA - Ricardo Bofill Taller de Arquitectura Residence and Poolhouse in Llewelyn Park / Robert A M Stern. Image © Norman McGrath Gate for a Maritime City / Massimo Scolari. Image © Massimo Scolari Housing De Piramides / Soeters Van Eldonk Architecten. Image © John Lewis Marshall + 12

From Pastel Pink to Pastel Blue: Why Colorful Architecture is Nothing New

04:00 - 23 May, 2017
From Pastel Pink to Pastel Blue: Why Colorful Architecture is Nothing New, Debenham House, 8 Addison Road, Kensington, by Halsey Ricardo (1905-1908). Image Courtesy of Hidden London
Debenham House, 8 Addison Road, Kensington, by Halsey Ricardo (1905-1908). Image Courtesy of Hidden London

In this essay by the British architect and academic Dr. Timothy Brittain-Catlin, the fascinating journey that color has taken throughout history to the present day—oscillating between religious virtuosity and puritan fear—is unpicked and explained. You can read Brittain-Catlin's essay on British postmodernism, here.

Like blushing virgins, the better architecture students of about ten years ago started to use coy colors in their drawings: pastel pink, pastel blue, pastel green; quite a lot of grey, some gold: a little like the least-bad wrapping paper from a high street store. Now step back and look at a real colored building – William Butterfield’s All Saints’ Church, Margaret Street, London, or Keble College, Oxford, or the interior of A.W.N. Pugin’s church of St. Giles in Cheadle, UK. They blow you away with blasts of unabashed, rich color covering every square millimetre of the space.