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Project Meganom: The Latest Architecture and News

Dvorulitsa Project by Meganom Proposes Reinvesting in Cities' Peripheries to Improve Urban Environments

Dvorulitsa Project by Meganom Proposes Reinvesting in Cities' Peripheries to Improve Urban EnvironmentsDvorulitsa Project by Meganom Proposes Reinvesting in Cities' Peripheries to Improve Urban EnvironmentsDvorulitsa Project by Meganom Proposes Reinvesting in Cities' Peripheries to Improve Urban EnvironmentsDvorulitsa Project by Meganom Proposes Reinvesting in Cities' Peripheries to Improve Urban Environments+ 16

Amidst efforts to revitalize and improve urban centers, the peripheral areas of cities are often ignored or forgotten. The intense focus on the downtown core means, in terms of land use, that only a relatively small area receives the majority of designers’ attention. "Dvorulitsa" (literally "Yardstreet" in Russian) is an urban development strategy proposed by Russian architecture firm Meganom, aiming to shift that focus. Taking the idea of the “superpark” from the 2013 study, "Archaeology of the Periphery," the yardstreet project presents an alternative method of viewing the periphery of a post-soviet city.

Chekhov APi / Askar Ramazanov + Archiproba Studios

Chekhov APi  / Askar Ramazanov + Archiproba StudiosChekhov APi  / Askar Ramazanov + Archiproba StudiosChekhov APi  / Askar Ramazanov + Archiproba StudiosChekhov APi  / Askar Ramazanov + Archiproba Studios+ 51

The Blog As A Museum: Meganom Makes its Online Exhibition Debut with Thngs

Courtesy of Thngs Co.
Courtesy of Thngs Co.

Our experience of information is changing. We now consume more and more information digitally, with much of this being non-textual. Videos, photos and GIFs have become commonplace, with technology allowing these mediums to be as easily shareable as text. This gives way to another trend: the increase in the number and accessibility of online platforms. Not only is more information being digitized, but more dynamic ways of digitization are being developed; multimedia articles and online exhibitions, for example, hope to provide a more engaging way of sharing information.

The Blog As A Museum: Meganom Makes its Online Exhibition Debut with ThngsThe Blog As A Museum: Meganom Makes its Online Exhibition Debut with ThngsThe Blog As A Museum: Meganom Makes its Online Exhibition Debut with ThngsThe Blog As A Museum: Meganom Makes its Online Exhibition Debut with Thngs+ 21

Project Meganom's Yuri Grigoryan: “Freedom is When You Realize that Anything is Possible”

Yuri Grigoryan founded Project Meganom in 1999 in Moscow with his partners Alexandra Pavlova, Iliya Kuleshov, and Pavel Ivanchikov. Together, the group all graduated from Moscow’s Architectural Institute, MArchI in 1991, the year of the Soviet Union’s collapse, and then practiced at the studio of Moscow architect Alexander Larin. Today Project Meganom is headed by Grigoryan, Iliya Kuleshov, Artem Staborovsky, and Elena Uglovskaya, and keeps in close contact with the theoretical side of architecture: Grigoryan teaches at his alma mater and until recently he was the Director of Education at Strelka Institute, founded in 2009 under the creative leadership of Rem Koolhaas, while in 2008 the practice was involved in the Venice Architecture Biennale with their San Stae project for curator Yuri Avvakumov's “BornHouse” exhibition. All of this gives Grigoryan an interesting overview of Russia's unique architectural context. In this interview from his “City of Ideas” column, Vladimir Belogolovsky speaks with Grigoryan about the issues facing Russian architecture and how Project Meganom has responded to those challenges.

Project Meganom's Yuri Grigoryan: “Freedom is When You Realize that Anything is Possible”Project Meganom's Yuri Grigoryan: “Freedom is When You Realize that Anything is Possible”Project Meganom's Yuri Grigoryan: “Freedom is When You Realize that Anything is Possible”Project Meganom's Yuri Grigoryan: “Freedom is When You Realize that Anything is Possible”+ 15

8 Projects that Exemplify Moscow's Urban Movement

When it comes to urbanism these days, people’s attention is increasingly turning to Moscow. The city clearly intends to become one of the world’s leading megacities in the near future and is employing all necessary means to achieve its goal, with the city government showing itself to be very willing to invest in important urban developments (though not without some criticism).

A key player in this plan has been the Moscow Urban Forum. Although the forum’s stated goal is to find adequate designs for future megacities, a major positive side-effect is that it enables the city to organize the best competitions, select the best designers, and build the best urban spaces to promote the city of Moscow. The Forum also publishes research and academic documents to inform Moscow’s future endeavors; for example, Archaeology of the Periphery, a publication inspired by the 2013 forum and released in 2014, notably influenced the urban development on the outskirts of Moscow, but also highlighted the importance of combining urban development with the existing landscape.

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AD Interviews: Yuri Grigoryan / Project Meganom

At the III Moscow Urban Forum, we had the chance to sit down with Russian architect Yuri Grigoryan, the co-founder of Project Meganom and the director of education at the Strelka Institute. Grigoryan also led the team that prepared the research project, “Archeology of the Periphery,” a key part of the forum that focused on the challenges and strategy for developing Moscow’s metropolitan area.

Sitting above the “Archeology of the Periphery” exhibition, Grigoryan told us what he thinks the role of an architect should be in society, what it’s like to lead a firm and the importance of innovation. “Architects have two very important roles. One is to do the architecture and to be good in architectural design. And the second role is to build the bridge between architecture, research and society,” he told us.

If you enjoy this interview make sure you check out our interview with both Grigoryan and Alexei Komissarov, the Moscow Government Minister and Head of the Department of Science, Industrial Policy and Entrepreneurship of Moscow, on the Forum and “Archeology of the Periphery.”

AD Interviews: Yuri Grigoryan / Project MeganomAD Interviews: Yuri Grigoryan / Project MeganomAD Interviews: Yuri Grigoryan / Project MeganomAD Interviews: Yuri Grigoryan / Project Meganom+ 6

Yuri Grigoryan and Alexei Komissarov at the III Moscow Urban Forum

Last month we had the chance to attend to the III Moscow Urban Forum, an instance where urbanists, architects, city mayors, the real estate industry and the citizens of Moscow had an open dialogue related to the future of the city under the theme “Megacities: Success Beyond the Centre”. The forum was organized by the Government of Moscow, who invited global urban planning gurus with experience in developing suburbs, to discuss how to resolve the problems of deprived outskirts, how to transform “dead” zones in towns into socially beneficial areas for work and leisure, how make a city environmentally sound and comfortable for living at a low cost, and how to create a transport system that is convenient for its citizens.