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Italo Calvino: The Latest Architecture and News

Intricate Illustrations of Italo Calvino's 'Invisible Cities'

09:00 - 28 November, 2018
Intricate Illustrations of Italo Calvino's 'Invisible Cities', Ipazia. Image © Karina Puente
Ipazia. Image © Karina Puente

Lima-based architect Karina Puente has created a new series in her personal project: to illustrate each and every "invisible" city from Italo Calvino's 1972 novel. Her collection, which ArchDaily published in 2016, and again in 2017, consists of mixed media collages, drawn mainly using ink on paper, brings together a sequence of imagined places – each referencing a city imagined in the book.

Invisible Cities, which imagines fictional conversations between the (real-life) Venetian explorer Marco Polo and the aged Mongol ruler Kublai Khan, has been instrumental in framing approaches to urban discourse and the form of the city. According to Puente, "each illustration has a conceptual process, some of which take more time than others." Usually "I research, think, and ideate over each city for three weeks before making sketches." The final drawings and cut-outs take around a week to produce.

Puente’s work is set to go on display in the San Miguel de Allende, Mexico on the 2nd February 2019. You can learn more about the project from Puente’s official website here.

Sofronia. Image © Karina Puente Sofronia. Image © Karina Puente Oliiva. Image © Karina Puente Armilla. Image © Karina Puente + 11

Italo Calvino's 'Invisible Cities', Illustrated (Again)

04:00 - 16 February, 2017
Italo Calvino's 'Invisible Cities', Illustrated (Again), Zobeida. Image © Karina Puente Frantzen
Zobeida. Image © Karina Puente Frantzen

Lima-based architect Karina Puente has a personal project: to illustrate each and every "invisible" city from Italo Calvino's 1972 novel. Her initial collection, which ArchDaily published in 2016, traced Cities and Memories. This latest series of mixed media collages, drawn mainly using ink on paper, brings together another sequence of imagined places – each referencing a city imagined in the book.

Invisible Cities, which imagines fictional conversations between the (real-life) Venetian explorer Marco Polo and the aged Mongol ruler Kublai Khan, has been instrumental in framing approaches to urban discourse and the form of the city. According to Puente, "each illustration has a conceptual process, some of which take more time than others." Usually "I research, think, and ideate over each city for three weeks before making sketches." The final drawings and cut-outs take around a week to produce.

Zaira. Image © Karina Puente Frantzen Diomira. Image © Karina Puente Frantzen Dorotea. Image © Karina Puente Frantzen Fedora. Image © Karina Puente Frantzen + 16

Italo Calvino's 'Invisible Cities', Illustrated

04:00 - 27 January, 2016
Italo Calvino's 'Invisible Cities', Illustrated, Zaira. Image © Karina Puente Frantzen
Zaira. Image © Karina Puente Frantzen

Lima-based architect Karina Puente has a personal project: to illustrate each and every "invisible" city from Italo Calvino's 1972 novel. The book, which imagines imaginary conversations between the (real-life) Venetian explorer Marco Polo and the aged Mongol ruler Kublai Khan has been instrumental in framing approaches to urban discourse and the form of the city. According to Puente, who has shared six drawings with ArchDaily, "each illustration has a conceptual process, some of which take more time than others." Usually "I research, think, and ideate over each city for three weeks before making sketches." The final drawings and cut-outs take around a week to produce.

Shelf Life: 33 Book Recommendations From Architects & Designers

01:00 - 4 August, 2014
Shelf Life: 33 Book Recommendations From Architects & Designers, Three Love Problems from George Eliot's Middlemarch, by Stephen Doyle. ​Photo: Stephen Doyle
Three Love Problems from George Eliot's Middlemarch, by Stephen Doyle. ​Photo: Stephen Doyle

Architects often don’t make time to read. Students and professionals alike will admit that the unread books on their shelves outnumber the ones they've read - which is unfortunate because literary contributions to the field of architecture, from Vitruvius to Le Corbusier, have shaped the way we build and use buildings for centuries. With this in mind, ArchitectureBoston polled their readers, asking them to share their favorite architecture and design titles, to compile a list of important architecture books you should set aside some time for. The list covers a wide range of subjects, from historical theory to the practicalities of starting a firm. See all thirty-three titles, after the break.