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Enrique Norten: The Latest Architecture and News

9 Times Architects Transformed Frank Lloyd Wright's Guggenheim Museum

07:00 - 13 October, 2016
Exhibition design by Gae Aulenti. Installation view: The Italian Metamorphosis, 1943–1968, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, October 6, 1994–January 22, 1995. Photo: David Heald
Exhibition design by Gae Aulenti. Installation view: The Italian Metamorphosis, 1943–1968, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, October 6, 1994–January 22, 1995. Photo: David Heald

This article originally appeared on guggenheim.org/blogs under the title "Nine Guggenheim Exhibitions Designed by Architects," and is used with permission.

Exhibition design is never straightforward, but that is especially true within the highly unconventional architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim Museum. Hanging a painting in a traditional “box” gallery can be literally straightforward, whereas every exhibition at the Guggenheim is the reinvention of one of the world’s most distinctive and iconic buildings. The building mandates site-specific exhibition design—partition walls, pedestals, vitrines, and benches are custom-fabricated for every show. At the same time, these qualities of the building present an opportunity for truly memorable, unique installations. Design happens simultaneously on a micro and macro scale—creating display solutions for individual works of art while producing an overall context and flow that engages the curatorial vision for the exhibition. This is why the museum’s stellar in-house exhibition designers all have an architecture background. They have developed intimate relationships with every angle and curve of the quarter-mile ramp and sloping walls.

Interview with Enrique Norten: "Architecture is Not a Competition of Strange Objects"

11:30 - 5 January, 2016
Interview with Enrique Norten: "Architecture is Not a Competition of Strange Objects", Rutgers Business School, Piscataway, New Jersey. Image © Peter Aaron
Rutgers Business School, Piscataway, New Jersey. Image © Peter Aaron

Founded in 1986 in Mexico City, Enrique Norten's practice TEN Arquitectos is not known for a signature style, preferring to make each project a modernist-infused response to its own specific conditions. Nonetheless, they have become one of the most widely-recognized architectural practices emerging from Mexico, with projects throughout North America. In the latest interview in his "City of Ideas" column, Vladimir Belogolovsky speaks with Norten in New York to find out how the architect's past has influenced his current design work, and to discuss the future trajectory of architecture.

The new Acapulco City Hall. Image Courtesy of TEN Arquitectos CENTRO University, Mexico City. Image © Luis Gordoa Mercedes House, New York City. Image ©  Evan Joseph Habita Hotel, Mexico City. Image © Luis Gordoa + 23

The Mexican Moment: The Rise of Architecture's Latest Design Capital

01:00 - 16 December, 2014
The Mexican Moment: The Rise of Architecture's Latest Design Capital, Museo Soumaya / FR-EE. Image © Rafael Gamo
Museo Soumaya / FR-EE. Image © Rafael Gamo

On a recent trip abroad, architect and urban planner José Castillo was struck by a conversation with Mexico’s tourism attaché in Asia. Mexican tourism, the attaché remarked, has changed; it was the ancient pyramids and sandy beaches of the country that once drew visitors to it. Today however, architecture and design—and food—prevail.

The issue of food may be of little wonder. Mexican cuisine has indeed become more popular than ever in both the high and low ends of the culinary spectrum, and food in general is not only what one eats for dinner but also a hobby and an obsessive conversation topic. Yet for local design to come to the same level of acclaim and reputation is, at any rate, quite astonishing. It may be, though, that food and architecture are not so far apart. These are both highly creative and productive professions, as well as ones with a rich history, a theory, and many layers of tradition.

La Tallera / Frida Escobedo. Image © Rafael Gamo Zeller & Moye and FR-EE's "Archivo". Image Courtesy of Zeller & Moye Foster + Partners and FR-EE's design for the new Mexico City Airport. Image Courtesy of DBOX for Foster + Partners PRODUCTORA's Auditorio Cuernavaca, with the Teopanzolco Pyramid in the background. Image Courtesy of PRODUCTORA + 9