All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions
  1. ArchDaily
  2. Behavioral Science

Behavioral Science: The Latest Architecture and News

Open Call: Conscious Cities Anthology 2018: Official Publication of the 2018 Conscious Cities Festival

18:04 - 24 July, 2018
Open Call: Conscious Cities Anthology 2018: Official Publication of the 2018 Conscious Cities Festival, Credit: Conscious Cities.
Credit: Conscious Cities.

In anticipation of the 2018 Conscious Cities Festival this October, we are delighted to announce an open call for submissions to its official publication - showcasing the diverse and impactful thinking by Conscious Cities practitioners.

For this issue, we are soliciting submissions related to the Conscious Cities manifesto from both festival participants and the general public. Festival participants have the freedom to submit any piece of work, regardless of what they plan to present. Casting this wide net will not only further demonstrate the vital and diverse work being done within the Conscious Cities movement, but also serve as a way

Here's What You Can Learn About Architecture from Tracking People's Eye Movements

09:30 - 6 December, 2017
Here's What You Can Learn About Architecture from Tracking People's Eye Movements, © Ann Sussman
© Ann Sussman

This article was originally published by Common Edge as "Game-Changing Eye-Tracking Studies Reveal How We Actually See Architecture."

While many architects have long clung to the old “form follows function” adage, form follows brain function might be the motto of today’s advertisers and automakers, who increasingly use high-tech tools to understand hidden human behaviors, and then design their products to meet them (without ever asking our permission!)

Biometric tools like an EEG (electroencephalogram) which measures brain waves; facial expression analysis software that follows our changing expressions; and eye-tracking, which allows us to record “unconscious” eye movements, are ubiquitous in all kinds of advertising and product development today—beyond the psychology or medical departments where you might expect to see them. These days you’ll also find them installed at the behavioral research and user experience labs in business schools such as American University in DC and Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) in Massachusetts.

What happens when you apply a biometric measure like eye-tracking to architecture? More than we expected...

Straight Lines or Curves, Which Do We Prefer?

00:00 - 27 October, 2013
Straight Lines or Curves, Which Do We Prefer? , © Flickr user, Simon & Vicki
© Flickr user, Simon & Vicki

Do we prefer straight lines or curves? According to Eric Jaffe's article on Fast Co.Design, it seems we subconsciously prefer the latter. Our brains, he claims, have evolved to perceive potential threat in sharp edges. "Square watches, pointy couches, and the like activate the amygdala. The part of the brain that processes fear." Thus, our feelings, buying habits and favorite buildings are subject to our affection of curves. Investigate for yourself and make sure to read the full article here, “Why Our Brains Love Curvy Architecture.