All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions
  1. ArchDaily
  2. Architecture School

Architecture School: The Latest Architecture and News

84.75 Studio Hours: A Week in the Life of a Master of Architecture Student

09:30 - 5 March, 2017
84.75 Studio Hours: A Week in the Life of a Master of Architecture Student, Courtesy of Kurt Nelson
Courtesy of Kurt Nelson

This article by Kurt Nelson originally appeared on Medium.

After reading through ArchDaily’s article on the hours architecture students work outside of class, I was curious. I made it through a Bachelor of Science in Architecture degree and I’m currently enrolled in the Master of Architecture program at the University of Pennsylvania, so how does the time I spend on coursework stack up to the average of 22.2 hours per week? Granted, the data they presented only represented first-year students, but it could still be an interesting comparison. With that in mind I set out to log one week of my time, just like you would at a job. Here’s what I found.

New Survey Confirms Architecture as Most Time Consuming Major

12:10 - 13 February, 2017
New Survey Confirms Architecture as Most Time Consuming Major, Yale Art + Architecture Building / Paul Rudolph + Gwathmey Siegel & Associates Architects. Image Courtesy of gwathmey siegel & associates architects
Yale Art + Architecture Building / Paul Rudolph + Gwathmey Siegel & Associates Architects. Image Courtesy of gwathmey siegel & associates architects

Architecture students have long groaned (or bragged) about the long hours and all-night work sessions demanded by their chosen major. Surely, we’ve all thought, no other major must be working this hard – right?

Now, thanks to the results of Indiana University's National 2016 Study of Student Engagement (NSSE), those assertions have been backed up with some numbers: architecture students were found to work an average of 22.2 hours per week, more than 2.5 hours more than any other major.

The Design Progress Through the Years

08:00 - 27 December, 2016
Courtesy of Leewardists
Courtesy of Leewardists

At its best, architecture can be a dream come true: the physical manifestation of the creative architect's most exquisite design fantasies. Nowhere is this kind of creative liberty more pervasive than in architecture school—with few practical concerns for cost, policy, or even structural integrity, architecture students are free to execute the purest and most complex proposals their imaginations will allow. And indeed, as their representation and spatial skills progress, students gain the ability to realize more advanced interventions over time. In the real world, though...not so much.

2016/2017 Hyde Lecture Series – University of Nebraska-Lincoln

12:25 - 20 September, 2016
2016/2017 Hyde Lecture Series – University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Hyde Lecture Series
Hyde Lecture Series

2016/2017 Hyde Lecture Series opens another exciting chapter for the design and planning disciplines as speakers take a fresh, in-depth look at the latest developments in their respective fields.

Study Finds 25% of UK Architecture Students Have Sought Treatment for Mental Health Issues

11:45 - 29 July, 2016
Study Finds 25% of UK Architecture Students Have Sought Treatment for Mental Health Issues, © Wikimedia CC user Fæ. Licensed by Flickr API - no known copyright restrictions
© Wikimedia CC user Fæ. Licensed by Flickr API - no known copyright restrictions

Are the rigors and tribulations of architecture school causing serious impacts on students' mental health? A new student survey conducted by Architect’s Journal has found that more than a quarter of architecture students in the UK are currently seeking or have sought medical help for mental health issues related to architecture school, and another 25% anticipate seeking help in the future.

The results have prompted Anthony Seldon, vice-chancellor at the University of Buckingham and a mental-health campaigner, to describe the situation as “a near epidemic of mental-health problems.”

Architecture/ Design College Fair

18:05 - 27 July, 2016
Architecture/ Design College Fair

Are you a high school or undergraduate student thinking about a career in architecture, interior design, or landscape design? If so, explore the possibilities at the BSA Architecture/Design College Fair.

Comic Break: "School vs. Work"

06:00 - 29 April, 2016
Comic Break: "School vs. Work", © Architexts
© Architexts

The classroom and the office are the two main settings where we learn about the practice of architecture, yet both expect the other to fill in more than a few gaps. Maybe schools shouldn’t emphasize the “technical details” and instead focus on teaching how to design; or maybe a little technical knowledge would be great preparation for that first job out of school (where you won’t get to design much more than a straight line). No matter which ideology you subscribe to, there will always be a disconnect between the classroom and the office.

New Aarhus School of Architecture "NEW AARCH" Design Competition

21:00 - 28 September, 2015
New Aarhus School of Architecture "NEW AARCH" Design Competition

The Danish Building & Property Agency publishes the design contest notice for the restricted design competition for the "NEW AARCH", the new School of Architecture in Aarhus, Denmark. The restricted design competition will take place in 2016. Read the design contest notice here.

Study Architecture with an International Focus at UIC Barcelona School of Architecture

11:00 - 11 May, 2015
Study Architecture with an International Focus at UIC Barcelona School of Architecture, © Aitor Estévez
© Aitor Estévez

With a clear international outlook and universal approach, the UIC Barcelona School of Architecture's Bachelor's Degree in Architecture offers students a holistic approach to architectural education, improving competitiveness by encouraging multiple skill sets, teamwork, responsibility, and entrepreneurship. The university employs a unique teaching method, where each student is tasked with undertaking a project at every step of the process.

The Top 100 Universities in the World for Architecture

18:50 - 29 April, 2015
The Top 100 Universities in the World for Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Cedric Weber / Shutterstock.com
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Cedric Weber / Shutterstock.com

QS has released its annual World University Rankings for 2015, covering 36 individual subjects and sorting based on "academic reputation, employer reputation and research impact." The company, which claims to explore the top 800 universities in the world, began publishing academic rankings in 2011. Read on to see the list of top universities for architecture, and be sure to see the full, sortable list at QS's site.

ACSA to Host Architecture School Webinar Series

11:00 - 23 April, 2015
ACSA to Host Architecture School Webinar Series

Looking for a professional degree, post professional degree, or want to learn the difference? Want to see what a degree in architecture can mean for your future? On April 25, 2015, from 1:00pm - 5:00pm ET, the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) will host the ACSA Creative Futures: Architecture School Webinars Series. The four, 30-minute webinars will cover the following topics:

ArchDaily's Most Useful Articles of All Time

00:00 - 8 September, 2014
ArchDaily's Most Useful Articles of All Time

As summer draws to an end and we enter into the last quarter of 2014, we decided to round-up a selection of the most useful articles we've published over the past three years. Ranging from The 40 Architecture Documentaries to Watch in 2014 to The 10 Most Overlooked Women in Architectural History, we've also brought together app guides, career tips, and city guides. Alongside links to open-source CAD files and cut-out people, we've also featured book recommendations, study tips, and links to our complete coverage of some of the world's major architectural events and prizes. Delve into our collection and discover what our readers have found most useful!

Inaugural Global Schindler Award Registration Now Open: Mobility in Shenzhen

01:00 - 13 August, 2014
Inaugural Global Schindler Award Registration Now Open: Mobility in Shenzhen , Courtesy of Global Schindler Award
Courtesy of Global Schindler Award

The Global Schindler Award is a new competition for students that will explore questions about universal mobility and access amidst rapid globalization and urbanization. In its inaugural year, a real site in Shenzhen – a booming commercial and industrial area adjacent to Hong Kong – has been chosen as the subject of the urban design proposals. Entrants are being asked to re-imagine the city as an inclusive urban environment and will be vying for portions of the $150,000 prize fund.

Stelka Institute Presents: Moscow's “Urban Routines”

01:00 - 25 July, 2014
Courtesy of Strelka Institute
Courtesy of Strelka Institute

Over the course of nine months, graduate students at the Strelka Institute studied the urban landscape of Moscow and the daily routines of its inhabitants, focusing "on new, little-noticed, and as-yet unresolved contradictions." The main goal of the projects was to come up with solutions that could be applied in practice.

The research projects, collectively entitled "Urban Routines," were presented at the end of this past June at the graduate show. Program director David Erixon said that while the theme might seem naive, "when you start looking at seemingly trivial things in a new way they are not so trivial anymore." For details about the individual research projects - covering Cars, Retail, Dwelling, Offices, and Links - keep reading after the break.

Courtesy of Strelka Institute Courtesy of Strelka Institute Courtesy of Strelka Institute Courtesy of Strelka Institute + 24

New Harvard GSD Class Asks: Are Competitions Worth It?

00:00 - 8 June, 2014
New Harvard GSD Class Asks: Are Competitions Worth It?, BIG's 2009 render for the National Library in Astana, Kazakhstan, which was never built. Image © BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group
BIG's 2009 render for the National Library in Astana, Kazakhstan, which was never built. Image © BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group

For small firms, design competitions can often feel like a Catch22 - enter and lose precious time and resources (usually for nothing) or avoid them - at the risk of losing out on the "big break." Now a new class at Harvard's Graduate School of Design takes on just this quandary, as well as the many other practical, theoretical, and moral implications of architectural competitions for the profession. Learn more at this article at the Harvard Gazette.

The Dean of Parsons: Design Education Must Change

00:00 - 10 November, 2013
via Josh Barndt, Alexandra Castillo Kesper, Braden Crooks, Aubrey Murdock, Joel Stein, and Charles Wirene. This year Parsons formed a partnership with New York City’s Center for Social Innovation to incubate design-led social innovation projects by Parsons students and alumni. One of the projects in development is Citysteading, a community-driven process for empowering and engaging marginal-ized communities. Image Courtesy of Metropolis Magazine
via Josh Barndt, Alexandra Castillo Kesper, Braden Crooks, Aubrey Murdock, Joel Stein, and Charles Wirene. This year Parsons formed a partnership with New York City’s Center for Social Innovation to incubate design-led social innovation projects by Parsons students and alumni. One of the projects in development is Citysteading, a community-driven process for empowering and engaging marginal-ized communities. Image Courtesy of Metropolis Magazine

Although university is meant to be a place of educational exploration, paths, particularly for architects and designers, tend to be extremely prescribed. In "Notes from the Dean," originally published in Metropolis Magazine, Executive Dean Joel Towers describes how the Parsons New School for Design is pioneering a new design program that is more reflective of modern design approaches: "The world has changed; the role of design has changed. And the way that designers are taught to engage with the world must change, too."

Every generation is presented with challenges specific to its time and place. We live in a world changing in ways that were unimaginable at the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, when design education first began to take shape. Technology (aided and abetted by design), advances in scientific knowledge, and shifts in social and cultural norms shaped design in the twentieth century. Our problems today involve more complex and interconnected systems—climate, cities, resources, networks, flows—and call for a new paradigm. Design in the twenty-first century is of critical importance in both addressing these challenges and transforming them into opportunities to remake the world around us. To do so, design education must change.

Design schools have traditionally adhered to a model that builds programs based on a foundation year, a well-defined and contained introduction to the basics of material, form, and color. And while that foundation is an important cornerstone of design education, it leaves little room for the more exploratory methods of cross-disciplinary and technology-based learning, and for understanding and applying design in the context of the larger world. That old model needs to evolve to reflect design’s enhanced role as a catalyst for innovation and creativity.

AA Students "Amplify the Forest"

00:00 - 5 October, 2013
AA Students "Amplify the Forest", Courtesy of Stewart Dodd and the Architectural Association
Courtesy of Stewart Dodd and the Architectural Association

Marking the Forest, now in its second year, is a ten-day summer course by the Architectural Association. Set in a managed forest in central Oregon, it aims to engage students with the forest through thoughtful architectural intervention.

Mark Wigley Steps Down as Dean of Columbia University's GSAPP

00:00 - 24 September, 2013
Mark Wigley Steps Down as Dean of Columbia University's GSAPP, Mark Wigley with Kenneth Frampton, during the filming of The Glass House: “Conversations in Context”. Image Courtesy of http://vimeo.com/44405886
Mark Wigley with Kenneth Frampton, during the filming of The Glass House: “Conversations in Context”. Image Courtesy of http://vimeo.com/44405886

Mark Wigley announced Monday that he will be stepping down as dean of Columbia University's Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) at the end of the academic year in 2014.