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Ossip van Duivenbode

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Spotlight: Rem Koolhaas

With the extensive list of acclaimed alumni of his firm, OMA, it is not a stretch to call Rem Koolhaas (born 17 November 1944) the godfather of contemporary architecture. Equal parts theorist and designer, over his 40-year career Koolhaas has revolutionized the way architects look at program and interaction of space, and today continues to design buildings that push the capabilities of architecture to new places.

Seattle Central Library / OMA + LMN. Image Courtesy of OMA Maison Bordeaux. Image © Hans Werlemann, courtesy OMA Fondazione Prada. Image © Bas Princen Casa da Musica. Image © Philippe Ruault + 39

Villa Vught / Mecanoo

© Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode + 40

  • Architects: Mecanoo
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 683.0 m2
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2019

WERK12 / MVRDV

© Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode + 36

  • Architects: MVRDV
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 7700.0 m2
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2019

Triodos Bank / RAU Architects

© Ossip van Duivenbode © Bert Rietberg © Bert Rietberg © Ossip van Duivenbode + 31

Driebergen-Rijsenburg, The Netherlands
  • Architects: RAU Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 12994.0 m2
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2019

World’s First Publicly Accessible Art Depot by MVRDV Tops Out in Rotterdam

The world's first publicly accessible art depot by MVRDV has topped out in Rotterdam. Called Depot Boijmans Van Beuningen, the new archive building was celebrated with a ceremony by the Stichting Collectiegebouw consortium, which comprises the museum, the municipality of Rotterdam, and Stichting De Verre Bergen. The depot will host the museum’s archive of 151,000 artworks and will be fully accessible to the public.

© Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode + 11

House M&M / NEXT architects + Claudia Linders

© Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode + 22

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Holland Boulevard and Rijksmuseum Schiphol / NEXT architects

© Thijs Wolzak © Thijs Wolzak © Thijs Wolzak © Ossip van Duivenbode + 10

  • Architects: NEXT architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 5000.0 m2
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2016

100 Public Spaces: From Tiny Squares to Urban Parks

© DuoCai Photograph
© DuoCai Photograph

© Gianluca Stefani © Thomas Zaar © Tomasz Zakrzewski © Sebastien Michelini + 112

This collection is one of many interesting content groupings made by our registered users. Remember you can save and manage what inspires you on My ArchDaily. Create your account here.

The key to successfully designing or recovering public spaces is to achieve a series of ingredients that enhance their use as meeting places. Regardless of their scale, some important tips are designing for people's needs, the human scale, a mix of uses, multifunctionality and flexibility, comfort and safety, and integration to the urban fabric.

To give you some ideas on how to design urban furniture, bus stops, lookouts, bridges, playgrounds, squares, sports spaces, small parks and urban parks, check out these 100 notable public spaces.

Roskilde Festival Folk High School / MVRDV + COBE

© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST © Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST © Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode + 27

Roskilde, Denmark
  • Architects: COBE, MVRDV
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 5578.0 m2
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2019

Three Generation House / BETA office for architecture and the city

© Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode + 26

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

The Week in Architecture: Blue Monday and the Aspirations of a New Year

For those in the northern hemisphere, the last full week in January last week kicks off with Blue Monday - the day claimed to be the most depressing of the year. Weather is bleak, sunsets are early, resolutions are broken, and there’s only the vaguest glimpse of a holiday on the horizon. It’s perhaps this miserable context that is making the field seem extra productive, with a spate of new projects, toppings out and, completions announced this week.

The week of 21 January 2019 in review, after the break: 

LocHal / Mecanoo. Image © Ossip van Duivenbode © TMRW, courtesy of Gensler ©Jaime Navarro The Week in Architecture: Blue Monday and the Aspirations of a New Year + 11

Why Reusing Buildings Should - and Must - be the Next Big Thing

Sustainability awards and standards touted by professional architecture organizations often stop at opening day, failing to take into account the day-to-day energy use of a building. With the current format unlikely to change, how can we rethink the way what sustainability means in architecture today? The first step might be to stop rewarding purpose-built architecture, and look instead to the buildings we already have. This article was originally published on CommonEdge as"Why Reusing Buildings Should be the Next Big Thing."

At the inaugural Rio Conference on the Global Environment in 1992, three facts became abundantly clear: the earth was indeed warming; fossil fuels were no longer a viable source of energy; the built environment would have to adapt to this new reality. That year I published an essay in the Journal of Architectural Education called “Architecture for a Contingent Environment” suggesting that architects join with both naturalists and preservationists to confront this situation.

Amstel Tower / Powerhouse Company

© Ossip van Duivenbode © Jeroen Musch © Jeroen Musch © Egbert de Boer + 7

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

The Top Creative Cities and Countries of 2018 According to Airbnb

As 2018 draws to a close, accommodation website Airbnb has dived into their data to reveal the most creative cities and countries from the year. Based on the percentage of hosts who are in the creative industries, the list builds on a previous survey by Airbnb which found that one in 10 Airbnb hosts and one in three Experience hosts identify as members of the creative community.

Read on below for the list of top creative countries and cities according to the new Airbnb study. For architects already planning a New Year’s getaway, check out an article we published of ten projects previously featured by ArchDaily, now available for booking through Airbnb.

Future Towers / MVRDV

© Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode © Ossip van Duivenbode + 40

Pune, India
  • Architects: MVRDV
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 140000.0 m2
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2018

Norra Tornen / OMA | Reinier de Graaf

© Ossip van Duivenbode
© Ossip van Duivenbode

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 37

Norrmalm, Sweden
  • Architects: OMA
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 42299.0 m2
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2018