Ossip van Duivenbode

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Olfactory Comfort in Architecture and the Impact of Odors on Well-Being

Cooking shows have never been more popular around the world than they are now. Whether from recipes, reality shows, or documentaries, writer Michael Pollan points out that it is not uncommon to spend more time watching than preparing our own food. This is a very curious phenomenon, as we can only imagine the tastes and smells on the other side of the screen, which the presenters often like to remind us. At the same time, when we watch something about the Middle Ages, polluted rivers, or nuclear disasters, we are relieved that there is no technology to transmit smells across the screen. In fact, when dealing with odors (more specifically the bad ones), we know how unpleasant it is to be in a space that doesn't smell good. When dealing with buildings, what are the main sources of bad smells and how can this affect our health and well-being?

Depot Boijmans Van Beuningen Museum / MVRDV

© Ossip van Duivenbode© Rob Galastra© Ossip van Duivenbode© Ossip van Duivenbode+ 16

Rotterdam, The Netherlands
  • Architects: MVRDV
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2020

Tencent Beijing Headquarters / OMA

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  • Architects: OMA
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2020

Fill in the Gaps: Infill Architecture in Urban Residual Spaces

In all cities around the world, there are some forms of residual space, forgotten pieces of the urban fabric, remnants of overlapping layers of past development. This land whose conditions make it unsuitable for most types of conventional construction might be a fertile ground for architectural invention. Assigning a new value to vacant corner lots, dead-end alleys and strangely shaped plots opens up a new field of opportunities for inward urban development, expanding available living space and increasing amenities in densely populated cities. The following explores the potential for experiment and urban activation held by urban leftover space.

Het Epos School / SeARCH

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  • Architects: SeARCH
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  2325
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2020
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Alucobond, Archicad, Luna Thermowood, de Haan Westerhof

On Recycled Architecture: 12 Proposals to Promote Adaptive Reuse

When reflecting on recycling, sustainability, measures to take, and innovative technological solutions, one cannot help but think that there are also familiar approaches that should be taken into consideration. In fact, when examining the impact of the built environment on the climate, one notes that in many countries, 80% of the buildings that will exist in 2050 have already been built. The most effective form of sustainability may, therefore, be saving energy by eliminating or minimizing new constructions, and by avoiding the demolition of existing structures.

That is what adaptive reuse stands for: instilling a new purpose on an existing “leftover building.” Nowadays, the refashioning process is becoming essential because of numerous issues related to the climate emergency, plot and construction costs, a saturation of land, and a change in living trends.

Courtesy of Cityscape Digital for PembrokeCourtesy of Skidmore, Owings & MerrillCourtesy of WXY Architecture + Urban DesignCourtesy of EFFEKT+ 14

MicroCity Het Platform / VenhoevenCS

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  • Architects: VenhoevenCS
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  170
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2020
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: AutoDesk, 2tec2, Microbeton, Sempergreen, B&S natuursteen, +7

Urban Visions: How India is Shaping the Future of Housing

India is rethinking the future of housing through new typologies. Defined by historical and cultural influences, the country's contemporary architecture centers on discussions of how best to modernize. Built over millennia, India's housing projects are made to address diverse scales, programs and functions. Exploring a revitalized urban landscape, these modern housing projects have begun to set a new tone for the future.

© Hemant Patil© Carlos Chen© Umang Shah© Shamanth Patil+ 10

Three Generation House / BETA office for architecture and the city

© Ossip van Duivenbode
© Ossip van Duivenbode

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House Buiksloterham / NEXT architects

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Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • Architects: NEXT architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  260
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2017

Visitor Center Unesco World Heritage Site Kinderdijk / M& DB Architecten

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  • Architects: M& DB Architecten
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  1180
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2019

Spotlight: Rem Koolhaas

With the extensive list of acclaimed alumni of his firm, OMA, it is not a stretch to call Rem Koolhaas (born 17 November 1944) the godfather of contemporary architecture. Equal parts theorist and designer, over his 40-year career Koolhaas has revolutionized the way architects look at program and interaction of space, and today continues to design buildings that push the capabilities of architecture to new places.

Seattle Central Library / OMA + LMN. Image Courtesy of OMAMaison Bordeaux. Image © Hans Werlemann, courtesy OMAFondazione Prada. Image © Bas PrincenCasa da Musica. Image © Philippe Ruault+ 39