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Clément Guillaume

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4 Solutions for Roofs without Eaves (and their Construction Details)

In his Robie House, Frank Lloyd Wright created an ingenious arrangement of public and private spaces that slowly moving away from the street through a series of horizontal planes. Pronounced eaves made the interior space expand toward the outside. Considered the first phase of the American architect's career, the so-called Prairie Houses had marked horizontality, mainly due to the enormous plans created by slightly inclined eaves. Eaves are ubiquitous in most traditional architecture, and in addition to their aesthetic role, they serve several important functions, the primary one being to keep rainwater away from the building's walls and structure. But for some time now, we have seen plenty of projects with sloping roofs without eaves, forming pure and unornamented volumes. This brings us to the question: in these projects, how are practical issues such as draining rainwater?

"Olympe de Gouges" Group of Schools / Dominique Coulon & associés

© Clement Guillaume© Clement Guillaume© Clement Guillaume© Clement Guillaume+ 34

Recycling Tiles: 15 Examples of Repurposed Tiles in Walls, Facades, Flooring, and Furniture

Nave 8 B / Arturo Franco. Image © Carlos Fernández Piñar
Nave 8 B / Arturo Franco. Image © Carlos Fernández Piñar

The Beehive / Luigi Rosselli + Raffaello Rosselli. Image © Ben HoskingCafé KOI / Farming Architects. Image © Nguyen Thai ThachClay Roof House / DRTAN LM Architect. Image © H.Lin HoNave 8 B / Arturo Franco. Image © Carlos Fernández Piñar+ 17

Whether you're looking for an upgrade or to replace broken pieces for floors or walls, tiles are always an effective and readily available option for any project that you have in mind. With their relatively low production cost, tiles are rarely reused or recycled and, if they are, it's usually for their original function.

Wooden Nursery / Djuric Tardio Architectes

© Clément Guillaume© Clément Guillaume© Clément Guillaume© Clément Guillaume+ 27

Timber Trends: 7 To Watch for 2020

The history of timber construction stretches back as far as the Neolithic period, or potentially even earlier, when humans first began using wood to build shelters from the elements. The appearance of the first polished stone tools, such as knives and axes, then made wood handling more efficient and precise, increasing the thickness of wood sections and their resistance. Over the decades, the rustic appearance of these early constructions became increasingly orthogonal and clean, as a result of standardization, mass production, and the emergence of new styles and aesthetics.

Today we are experiencing another seminal moment within the evolution of timber. Nourished and strengthened by technological advances, new prefabrication systems, and a series of processes that increase its sustainability, safety, and efficiency, timber structures are popping up in the skylines of cities and in turn, is reconnecting our interior spaces with nature through the warmth, texture, and beauty of wood. Where will this path lead us? Below, we review 7 trends that suggest this progress is only set to continue, increasing both the capabilities and height of timber buildings in the years to come.

Innovative Uses of Water in Architecture

From playful indoor pools to tranquil exterior fountains to soaring waterfalls and grand lakes of enormous proportions, architecture throughout the centuries has engaged with water in endlessly innovative ways. Sometimes serving aesthetic purposes, but just as often acting as centers of activity or promoting sustainability, water features can take countless different forms and serve multiple different purposes. Below, we synthesize a series of water features espoused by innovative contemporary architectural projects, ranging from single-family residential homes to vast commercial complexes.

The Winery at VIK / Smiljan Radic. Image © Cristobal PalmaJellyfish House / Wiel Arets Architects. Image © Jan BitterJewel Changi Airport / Safdie Architects. Image Courtesy of Peter Walkner Partners Landscape ArchitectsMoses Bridge / RO&AD Architecten. Image © RO&AD Architecten+ 34

Student Housing / Atelier Villemard Associés

© Clément Guillaume© Clément Guillaume© Clément Guillaume© Clément Guillaume+ 20

Champs-sur-Marne, France

Musee du Quai Branly / Ateliers Jean Nouvel

© Roland Halbe© Clément Guillaume© Roland Halbe© Philippe Ruault+ 21

Interdepartemental Management and Administration Center / Ateliers 2/3/4/

© Clément Guillaume© Clément Guillaume© Clément Guillaume© Clément Guillaume+ 30

Versailles, France

BLOX / OMA / Ellen Van Loon

Photograph by Hans Werlemann, Courtesy of OMAPhotograph by Hans Werlemann, Courtesy of OMAPhotograph by Richard John Seymour, Courtesy of OMAPhotograph by Delfino Sisto Legnani and Marco Cappelletti, Courtesy of OMA+ 86

  • Architects: OMA
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  28000
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2018

MI-mAbs / Mira

© Clément Guillaume© Clément Guillaume© Clément Guillaume© Clément Guillaume+ 27

  • Architects: Mira
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  2090
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2017
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: BASF, Arc Conception, Process bois Laudescher

Town Entrance in Chatenay Malabry / Ateliers 2/3/4/

© Clément Guillaume© Clément Guillaume© Clément Guillaume© Clément Guillaume+ 28

Châtenay-Malabry, France
  • Architects: Ateliers 2/3/4/
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  4200
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2016
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: IB Mobilier Urbain, Targetti & Commatelec

Chausson's Garden / Ateliers 2/3/4/

© Clément Guillaume© Clément Guillaume© Clément Guillaume© Clément Guillaume+ 36

  • Architects: Ateliers 2/3/4/
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  6500
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2016
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: WE-EF, KOMPAN, Seri, UrbanPlay
  • Professionals: Berim

40 Projects Shortlisted for the 2017 EU Prize for Contemporary Architecture - Mies Van Der Rohe Award

The European Commission and the Mies van der Rohe Foundation have announced the 40 shortlisted works that will compete for the 2017 European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture – Mies van der Rohe Award. The jury has chosen from 355 nominated works and the shortlist highlights the opportunities and the trends of today’s European territory: cities, housing, heritage, and memory. The five finalists will be announced in mid-February and the winner and the Emerging Architect in mid-May.

A third of the works tackle the challenge of contemporary architecture in relation with built heritage and a third of the work tackles the contemporary challenges of housing. The management of the historic urban landscape will be among the priorities highlighted by the ‘European Year of Cultural Heritage' in 2018.

"I would want the shortlisted schemes to demonstrate an interest in making places, in exploring convention and known typologies, in celebrating the pleasures of everyday use by a consideration of detail and an unspoken resistance to the current global tendency towards a self-referential architecture, one that belies context and the act of inhabitation." - Stephen Bates, Chairman of the Jury.

Seen the shortlist after the break.