Burnside Tokyo Culinary Space / Snohetta

Burnside Tokyo Culinary Space / Snohetta

Burnside Tokyo Culinary Space / Snohetta - Interior Photography, ChairBurnside Tokyo Culinary Space / Snohetta - Interior Photography, Kitchen, ColumnBurnside Tokyo Culinary Space / Snohetta - Interior Photography, Chair, ColumnBurnside Tokyo Culinary Space / Snohetta - Interior Photography, Table, ChairBurnside Tokyo Culinary Space / Snohetta - More Images+ 2

  • Architects: Snohetta
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  1000 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2021
  • Photographs
  • Client : en one tokyo
  • Interior Design : Anne-Rachel Schiffmann, Mzwakhe Ndlovu
  • Local Architect : kooo architects
  • Collaborators : Ghetto Gastro, Devon Turnbull, Makato Azuma
  • Artwork : Block Flowers by Makato Azuma
  • Country : Japan
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Burnside Tokyo Culinary Space / Snohetta - Interior Photography, Kitchen, Chair
© Keishin Horikoshi /SS

Text description provided by the architects. Using food to empower communities, Ghetto Gastro celebrates the Bronx as an inspiration and catalyst of global culture. Burnside builds upon this creative energy where the Bronx and Tokyo meet. Since their founding in 2012, Ghetto Gastro’s work to explore global food traditions has led to immersive culinary experiences produced with the approach of art installations. Inspired by this intersection of cultures, Snøhetta, en one tokyo, Ghetto Gastro, and local architect kooo architects have teamed up with artisanal, handmade sound system designer Devon Turnbull (Ojas), and flower artist Makoto Azuma to create an unparalleled dining and social experience that combines the elements of a bodega with a bar.

Burnside Tokyo Culinary Space / Snohetta - Interior Photography, Kitchen, Column
© Keishin Horikoshi /SS

New York-style Bodegas, or conbini as they’re called in Japan, are a shared cultural experience of both Tokyo and the Bronx – the ease of takeaway and their ubiquity as neighborhood mainstays have cemented their place in the urban fabric of the two cities. Burnside Tokyo draws upon the conbini lexicon on the second floor above a Family Mart. Walking up to the second floor, the space unfolds into a focused view of the dining room and open kitchen. A wall of fabric-lined windows filters daylight into the space, creating the feeling of an active and humming café by day, and at night the windows bring in light from the street below to create an atmospheric lounge.

Burnside Tokyo Culinary Space / Snohetta - Interior Photography, Chair
© Keishin Horikoshi /SS

The transition between day and night, café and lounge, is a driving theme for the interior design. Two intersecting arches create a well-defined café/dining area and kitchen while also allowing views across both spaces, blurring the line between front-of-house and back-of-house. A dark material palette features amber-colored accents that reflect the changing light throughout the day while highlighting more ornate design elements such as the floral sculptures designed by Makoto Azuma. With a 30-person max capacity, the dining room is suited to maximize the floor space with custom-designed family-style tables that join together and fold away to allow a variety of layouts, including creating a dance floor for late-night events.

Burnside Tokyo Culinary Space / Snohetta - Interior Photography, Table, Chair
© Keishin Horikoshi /SS

The dining room culminates in a proscenium arch at the pass table, where back-of-house and front-of-house intersect. This central pass table becomes the hearth of the kitchen at the project’s center. Beyond the dining room threshold is an open kitchen that revolves around the activity of the chefs and the culinary experience of heat and fire. The kitchen layout, designed with input from Ghetto Gastro, is intended to easily adapt for future chefs in the rotating roster. The overall flexibility of the design and layout ensures that the space accommodates a wide variety of pop-up uses and events.  

Burnside Tokyo Culinary Space / Snohetta - Interior Photography, Chair, Column
© Keishin Horikoshi /SS

As Snøhetta’s first project opening in Tokyo, Burnside is a unique collaboration that has culminated in a flexible, creative destination for Harajuku’s artistic milieu. Whether hosting an up-and-coming chef, serving as a casual coffeehouse, or throwing a release party, guests will feel transported by this sleek intersection of Tokyo and the Bronx.

Burnside Tokyo Culinary Space / Snohetta - Interior Photography, Chair, Windows
© Keishin Horikoshi /SS

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Project location

Address:Tokyo, Japan

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Location to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address.
About this office
Cite: "Burnside Tokyo Culinary Space / Snohetta" 03 Feb 2021. ArchDaily. Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/956195/informal-art-and-culinary-space-in-tokyo-snohetta> ISSN 0719-8884

© Keishin Horikoshi /SS

Burnside 东京美食餐厅 / Snohetta

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