MASS Design Group’s Poignant Memorial for Victims of Lynching Opens to the Public in Alabama

MASS Design Group’s Poignant Memorial for Victims of Lynching Opens to the Public in Alabama

The "National Memorial for Peace and Justice," designed in collaboration with MASS Design Group, has opened in Montogomery Alabama. Commissioned by the Equal Justice Initiative, the scheme is America’s first memorial dedicated to “the legacy of enslaved black people, people terrorized by lynching, African Americans humiliated by racial segregation and Jim Crow, and people of color burdened with contemporary presumptions of guilt and police violence.”

The memorial's April 23rd opening coincided with the opening of the Equal Justice Initiative's Legacy Museum, addressing similar injustices.

Memorial Monuments at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice. Image © Equal Justice Initiative / Human Pictures Hank Willis Sculpture at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice. Image © Equal Justice Initiative / Human Pictures Exterior of the National Memorial for Peace and Justice. Image © Equal Justice Initiative / Human Pictures Kwame Akoto Bamfo Exhibit at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice. Image © Equal Justice Initiative / Human Pictures + 9

Exterior of the National Memorial for Peace and Justice. Image © Equal Justice Initiative / Human Pictures
Exterior of the National Memorial for Peace and Justice. Image © Equal Justice Initiative / Human Pictures

The memorial was conceived with the goal of creating a sober, meaningful place of reflection for America’s history of racial inequality. Set across a six-acre site, the memorial contains over 800 corten steel monuments: one for every county in the United States which experienced racial terror lynching. Engraved in the columns are the names of lynching victims, symbolizing thousands of people through history who suffered from brutality.

Memorial Monuments at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice. Image © Equal Justice Initiative / Human Pictures
Memorial Monuments at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice. Image © Equal Justice Initiative / Human Pictures

A journey through the memorial begins with a confrontation by a sculpture by West African artist Kwame Akoto-Bamfo, before leading visitors on “a journey through slavery, through lynching and racial terror, with text, narrative, and monuments to the lynching victims of America.”

Kwame Akoto Bamfo Exhibit at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice. Image © Equal Justice Initiative / Human Pictures
Kwame Akoto Bamfo Exhibit at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice. Image © Equal Justice Initiative / Human Pictures
Hank Willis Sculpture at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice. Image © Equal Justice Initiative / Human Pictures
Hank Willis Sculpture at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice. Image © Equal Justice Initiative / Human Pictures

The center of the site is occupied by a memorial square designed in part by MASS before the journey continues through the Civil Rights era with a sculpture dedicated to women who sustained the Montgomery Bus Boycott, created by Dana King. At journey’s end, the memorial confronts issues of contemporary police violence and judicial bias, in a final work by Hank Willis Thomas. The memorial also displays writing from Toni Morrison, words from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr, and a space dedicated to Ida B. Wells.

The Legacy Museum Exterior. Image © Equal Justice Initiative / Human Pictures
The Legacy Museum Exterior. Image © Equal Justice Initiative / Human Pictures
The Legacy Museum Lobby. Image © Equal Justice Initiative / Human Pictures
The Legacy Museum Lobby. Image © Equal Justice Initiative / Human Pictures

Also opened on April 26th in Montgomery, Alabama was the Equal Justice Initiative's “Legacy Museum: From Enslavement to Mass Incarceration,” an 11,000-square-foot museum on the site of a former warehouse where enslaved black people were imprisoned. Relying on first-person accounts of the domestic slave trade, the EJI’s extensive record of materials and exhibits, and recently created content on segregation, the museum explores racial inequality and its relationship with contemporary injustices.

Slavery Evolved Wall at the Legacy Museum. Image © Equal Justice Initiative / Human Pictures
Slavery Evolved Wall at the Legacy Museum. Image © Equal Justice Initiative / Human Pictures
The Legacy Museum Jars. Image © Equal Justice Initiative / Human Pictures
The Legacy Museum Jars. Image © Equal Justice Initiative / Human Pictures

Visitors to the museum are confronted by slave pen replicas, narrated by first-person accounts of the dreadful conditions. Enriching visuals and data give visitors the chance to investigate America’s history of racial injustice, as do curated sculptures by Titus Kaphar, Sanford Biggers, Elizabeth Catlett, and John Biggers. Creative partners also include Local Projects, HBO, and Google.

News via: Equal Justice Initiative

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Cite: Niall Patrick Walsh. "MASS Design Group’s Poignant Memorial for Victims of Lynching Opens to the Public in Alabama" 08 May 2018. ArchDaily. Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/894065/new-photographs-released-of-mass-design-groups-national-memorial-for-peace-and-justice-in-alabama/> ISSN 0719-8884
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Corridor at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice. Image © Equal Justice Initiative / Human Pictures

MASS新作“私刑遇难者纪念馆”,在阿拉巴马州向公众开放

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