the world's most visited architecture website
i

Sign up now and start saving and organizing your favorite architecture projects and photos

Sign up now to save and organize your favorite architecture projects

i

Find the most inspiring products for your projects in our Product Catalog.

Find the most inspiring products in our Product Catalog.

i

Get the ArchDaily Chrome Extension and be inspired with every new tab. Install here »

i

All over the world, architects are finding cool ways to re-use run-down old buildings. Click here to see the best in Refurbishment Architecture.

Want to see the coolest refurbishment projects? Click here.

i

Immerse yourself in inspiring buildings with our selection of 360 videos. Click here.

See our immersive, inspiring 360 videos. Click here.

All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions
Navigate articles using your keyboard
  1. ArchDaily
  2. Projects
  3. Houses
  4. Norway
  5. Snøhetta
  6. 2014
  7. ZEB Pilot House - Pilot Project / Snøhetta

ZEB Pilot House - Pilot Project / Snøhetta

  • 09:00 - 11 September, 2015
ZEB Pilot House - Pilot Project / Snøhetta
ZEB Pilot House - Pilot Project / Snøhetta , © Bruce Damonte
© Bruce Damonte

© Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte © Paal-André Schwital © Bruce Damonte + 36

  • Client

    Optimera and Brødrene Dahl (Saint Gobain)
  • Typology

    Zero Emission Demonstration Building
  • More Specs Less Specs
© Paal-André Schwital
© Paal-André Schwital

Text description provided by the architects. Snøhetta is an active partner within ZEB (The Research Center on Zero Emission Buildings). The ZEB Multi-Comfort House is a cooperation between Snøhetta, Scandinavia’s largest independent research body SINTEF, ZEB partner Brødrene Dahl, and Optimera. The volume of the house describes a single family house, however, the building is intended for use as a demonstration platform to facilitate learning on building methodology for plus houses with integrated sustainable solutions.

© Bruce Damonte
© Bruce Damonte

To achieve ZEB-OM classification the project is required to document and verify a minimum of 100% CO2 offsetting. Renewable energy production via photovoltaic and solar-thermal panels integrated in the building envelope enables offsetting of carbon emissions generated by the burning of fossil fuels in power stations. By offsetting in this manner we reduce emission of other greenhouse gasses simultaneously. Focus on carbon emissions associated with building materials represents a new direction in the vital drive toward a sustainable construction industry.

© Paal-André Schwital
© Paal-André Schwital

Characteristic tilt to the southeast

The house in the garden has a characteristic tilt towards southeast and a sloping roof surface clad with solar panels and collectors. These elements, together with geothermal energy from energy wells in the ground, will serve the energy needs of the family house and generate enough surplus to power an electric car year-round! For this to become a successful reality, architecture and technology must come together and ensure optimization of both comfort and energy use.

© EVE
© EVE

Daylight, view, and contact with landscape
and outdoor space is reconciled with the
need for balancing sealed walls and windows. Heating and cooling is solved passively through placement of glass surfaces, orientation, house geometry and volume, and choosing materials with good thermal characteristics. Materials used on interior surfaces have been chosen on the basis of their ability to contribute to good indoor climate and air quality as well as aesthetic qualities.

Diagram
Diagram

Outdoor atrium

An outdoor atrium with fireplace and furnishing opens for outdoor dining from early spring to late fall. A feeling of cabin life, in one of the world’s most advanced family houses, in a room with walls of stacked firewood and bricks.

© Bruce Damonte
© Bruce Damonte

Landscape

The landscape is formed as a garden where visitors can walk around the building and discover the elements that make this an exceptional family house. The garden has a swimming pool and shower utilizing solar- generated thermal heat surplus, a sauna heated with firewood, and storage rooms as shielding from neighbours. A breakfast spot on the eastern side with a view to neighbouring farmland is paved with recycled timber blocks, creating an inviting surface.

© Paal-André Schwital
© Paal-André Schwital

Environmental ambitions and design process

High environmental ambitions create new parameters in the design process. New tools
are put to use, the academic disciplines work closer together, and the requirements for documentation are more demanding than ever. In particular, the high focus on choice of material in early development phases is new, and it generates innovative design processes on a multidisciplinary level.

© Paal-André Schwital
© Paal-André Schwital

The design of such an ambitious environmental project is driven by knowledge of new technologies, local energy sources, materials and building techniques, and other resources at location, as well as intelligent placement and orientation in a way that facilitates optimal utilization of energy resources.

© Bruce Damonte
© Bruce Damonte

The project has a strong focus on retaining home-like qualities through non-quantifiable properties. Emotive comfort and sense of wellbeing have governed the design process
to the same extent as energy demands. The grounds employ a variety of spaces that can be enjoyed year-round, with the inclusion of fruit trees and vegetable gardens to accommodate small scale food production.

© Bruce Damonte
© Bruce Damonte

View the complete gallery

About this office
Snøhetta
Office
Cite: "ZEB Pilot House - Pilot Project / Snøhetta " 11 Sep 2015. ArchDaily. Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/773383/zeb-pilot-house-pilot-project-snohetta/> ISSN 0719-8884
Read comments
Read comments

You've started following your first account!

Did you know?

You'll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.