the world's most visited architecture website
i

Sign up now and start saving and organizing your favorite architecture projects and photos

Sign up now to save and organize your favorite architecture projects

i

Find the most inspiring products for your projects in our Product Catalog.

Find the most inspiring products in our Product Catalog.

i

Get the ArchDaily Chrome Extension and be inspired with every new tab. Install here »

i

All over the world, architects are finding cool ways to re-use run-down old buildings. Click here to see the best in Refurbishment Architecture.

Want to see the coolest refurbishment projects? Click here.

i

Immerse yourself in inspiring buildings with our selection of 360 videos. Click here.

See our immersive, inspiring 360 videos. Click here.

All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions
Navigate articles using your keyboard
  1. ArchDaily
  2. Projects
  3. Airfield Evolution / Solearth Architecture

Airfield Evolution / Solearth Architecture

  • 01:00 - 18 January, 2015
Airfield Evolution / Solearth Architecture
Airfield Evolution / Solearth Architecture, © Ros Kavanagh
© Ros Kavanagh

© Ros Kavanagh © Ros Kavanagh © Ros Kavanagh © Ros Kavanagh + 32

  • Main Contractor

    Glenbeigh Construction Ltd
  • Services Subcontractor

    Kirby Group
  • Quantity Surveyors

    Davis Langdon
  • Landscape Architects

    Dermot Foley
  • Structural and civil Engineers

    CORA
  • More Specs Less Specs
© Ros Kavanagh
© Ros Kavanagh

Text description provided by the architects. Airfield is a 35-acre working farm and estate located in the southern suburbs of Dublin, open to the public since 1998; it is an area of pastureland, woodland and walled gardens into which a patchwork of buildings has been introduced focused on Airfield House itself, which was the Overend family home from 1894. Airfield Trust was established in 1974 by the Overend sisters, Letitia and Naomi, as a charitable organisation with an educational and recreational remit provided through an environment connecting people and nature through the farm and gardens. To enhance the visitor experience and expand the facilities at Airfield a number of key spatial drivers have been put in place:

© Ros Kavanagh
© Ros Kavanagh

The first is a reorientation of the visitor access into the Estate with the formation of a new entrance avenue and car park. A new entrance pavilion with garden centre and ticketing then allows the visitor to proceed towards the front entrance of Airfield House. Adjacent is the relocated café, a linear structure that pushes the seating area out into the Estate providing a window to the fields.

© Ros Kavanagh
© Ros Kavanagh

The second driver is to expand the visitor experience to the whole site: the new food gardens are located along the northern boundary of the Estate leading to a new semi- walled garden with teaching pavilion set into the masonry wall for potting demonstrations and cooking.

© Ros Kavanagh
© Ros Kavanagh

The third driver is to reinvigorate the existing House: removing the café out of the House to a new pavilion structure to the south alleviates pressures on the existing building and allows for its restoration and strengthening of the relationship of House to front lawn and gardens. Furthermore, it presents Airfield with a natural space in which to exhibit the Overend archive.

Ground Floor Plan
Ground Floor Plan

The fourth driver is the restructuring of the core educational buildings to the east of Airfield House. The design re-establishes the historically clear building line and spatial rhythm of the stable blocks and out-buildings to the east of Airfield House with the provision of a new multi-function teaching and event space that defines a courtyard to the east.

© Ros Kavanagh
© Ros Kavanagh

Finally, the focussing of the farm activities in a new farm centre: this allows an integrated educational experience with provision of livestock housing, milking parlour and dairy kitchen. A working farmyard is positioned to the north of the centre and to the south lies the visitor farm yard with a grassed area surrounded by a sheltered cloister for animal viewing and feeding. 

© Ros Kavanagh
© Ros Kavanagh

View the complete gallery

Location to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address.
About this office
Solearth Architecture
Office
Cite: "Airfield Evolution / Solearth Architecture" 18 Jan 2015. ArchDaily. Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/587557/airfield-evolution-solearth-architecture/> ISSN 0719-8884
Read comments
Read comments