CTBUH Names World's 4 Best Skyscrapers of 2015

12:31 - 22 June, 2015
CTBUH Names World's 4 Best Skyscrapers of 2015, Bosco Verticale. Image © Kirsten Bucher
Bosco Verticale. Image © Kirsten Bucher

The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) has shortlisted four buildings for the annual "Best Tall Building Awards." Considered to be the four best skyscrapers of the year, the buildings have been named from each of the four competing regions in the world - Americas; Asia and Australia; Europe; the Middle East and Africa - from nominees representing 33 countries. One of the buildings will be crowned the world's best at a ceremony this November. 

The four top skyscrapers for 2015 are...

Sung Jang Creates Modular Pieces for “This is Not a Duet” Exhibit in New York

16:00 - 20 June, 2015
Sung Jang Creates Modular Pieces for “This is Not a Duet” Exhibit in New York, Mobi by Sung Jang. Image Courtesy of Chamber
Mobi by Sung Jang. Image Courtesy of Chamber

Currently on display at the Chamber in New York, Sung Jang’s “Mobi” is the investigation of transforming a modular, buttress-like element into “the human perception of beauty.” Mobi is part of Chamber’s latest exhibit, “This is Not a Duet,” curated by Maria Cristina Didero and Juan Garcia Mosqueda, and which showcases the oppositional work of two artists. Sung's Mobi is complimented by Gala Fernandez Montero's “Caro Ettore.”

WEISS/MANFREDI Break Ground on "The Bridge" at Cornell Tech’s Roosevelt Island Campus

14:20 - 17 June, 2015
WEISS/MANFREDI Break Ground on "The Bridge" at Cornell Tech’s Roosevelt Island Campus, Cornell Tech Phase 1. Image © WEISS/MANFREDI
Cornell Tech Phase 1. Image © WEISS/MANFREDI

WEISS/MANFREDI broke ground yesterday on Cornell Tech's pioneering building, "The Bridge." Spearheading the first phase of the $2 billion Roosevelt Island tech campus, the new building will "bridge" the gap between academia and industry, providing a seven-story "corporate co-location" loft where students and industry leaders will collaborate.  

“The Bridge is a crystalline incubator with river-to-river views and creates a three-dimensional crossroads, an ecosystem of innovation to catalyze collaboration between academics and entrepreneurs,” say design partners Marion Weiss and Michael A. Manfredi.

170 Amsterdam / Handel Architects

11:00 - 16 June, 2015
170 Amsterdam / Handel Architects, © Bruce Damonte
© Bruce Damonte

© Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte © Bruce Damonte +16

Could the Empire State Building Have Been Built with Wood?

08:00 - 16 June, 2015
Could the Empire State Building Have Been Built with Wood?, Courtesy of Metsä Wood
Courtesy of Metsä Wood

Michael Green has teamed up with Finnish forestry company Metsä Wood and Equilibrium Consulting to redesign the Empire State Building with wood as the main material. The project is part of Metsä Wood’s “Plan B” program, which explores what it would be like for iconic buildings to be made of timber. Their work shows that not only can wood be used to produce enormous structures in a dense urban context, but also that timber towers can fit into an urban setting and even mimic recognizable buildings despite differences in material.

Bjarke Ingels Talks About Two World Trade Center

09:30 - 15 June, 2015
Bjarke Ingels Talks About Two World Trade Center, © DBOX, Courtesy of BIG
© DBOX, Courtesy of BIG

Last week, after a month of speculation, BIG unveiled their plans for New York's Two World Trade Center, replacing Foster + Partners' design which although started on site, was stalled due to the financial crash of 2008. With the building's high profile, in just one week BIG's design has been the subject of intense scrutiny. In this interview, originally published by New York YIMBY as "Interview: Bjarke Ingels On New Design For 200 Greenwich Street, Aka Two World Trade Center," Nikolai Fedak talks to Bjarke Ingels about the design of the tower and why it was necessary to replace the scheme by Foster + Partners.

YIMBY sat down with Bjarke Ingels to talk about his firm’s design for 200 Greenwich Street, aka Two World Trade Center. Despite public outcry following the change from the Norman Foster version of the tower, BIG’s innovative and forward-thinking building will truly respond to the human needs of its tenants, while also punctuating the Downtown skyline with a 1,340-foot take on a classic ziggurat. We’ve also obtained a few additional renderings of the soon-to-be icon’s impact on the cityscape.

One of the design's rooftop gardens. Image © DBOX, Courtesy of BIG Lobby. Image © DBOX, Courtesy of BIG © DBOX, Courtesy of BIG © DBOX, Courtesy of BIG +9

Purpose / A+I

09:00 - 14 June, 2015
Purpose / A+I, © Magda Biernat
© Magda Biernat
  • Architects

  • Location

    Flatiron District, New York, NY, USA
  • Area

    15000.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photographs

© Magda Biernat © Magda Biernat © Magda Biernat © Magda Biernat +10

Little Red Elisabeth Irwin / Andrew Bartle Architects

09:00 - 11 June, 2015
Little Red Elisabeth Irwin / Andrew Bartle Architects, © Durston Saylor Photography
© Durston Saylor Photography
  • Architects

  • Location

    42 Charlton Street, New York, NY 10014, USA
  • Submitting Architect

    Andrew Bartle, AIA
  • ABA Studio Team

    Andrew Bartle, Sean Auyeung, Mark Barone, Karl Jensen, Joanne Graney, Ken Lake, John Thurman, Erin Ross
  • Area

    22000.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

© Durston Saylor Photography © Durston Saylor Photography © Durston Saylor Photography © Durston Saylor Photography +20

Little Red Elisabeth Irwin / Andrew Bartle Architects

09:00 - 11 June, 2015
Little Red Elisabeth Irwin / Andrew Bartle Architects, © Durston Saylor Photography
© Durston Saylor Photography
  • Architects

  • Location

    42 Charlton Street, New York, NY 10014, USA
  • Submitting Architect

    Andrew Bartle, AIA
  • ABA Studio Team

    Andrew Bartle, Sean Auyeung, Mark Barone, Karl Jensen, Joanne Graney, Ken Lake, John Thurman, Erin Ross
  • Area

    22000.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

© Durston Saylor Photography © Durston Saylor Photography © Durston Saylor Photography © Durston Saylor Photography +20

BIG Replaces Foster, Unveils Plans for 2 World Trade Center

12:49 - 9 June, 2015
BIG Replaces Foster, Unveils Plans for 2 World Trade Center, © DBOX, Courtesy of BIG
© DBOX, Courtesy of BIG

BIG has revealed plans for the fourth and final skyscraper planned for the World Trade Center site - the 2 World Trade Center (2 WTC) - confirming rumors that the Danish architect has replaced Norman Foster as the project's architect. 

As announced by WIRED, the controversial take over is the result of James Murdoch's distaste for Foster's decade-old scheme and preference for a more integrated workplace. Though the foundation of Foster's building has already been built, the BIG scheme will now be realized and become the new headquarters of Rupert Murdoch’s media companies, 21st Century Fox and News Corp.

Designed as seven unique building stacked on top of each other, the stepped 2 WTC tower will rise 1,340 feet - a height that would make it Manhattan's third-tallest building if built today. 

Watch Bjarke Ingels explain the concept in a video, after the break. 

© DBOX, Courtesy of BIG © DBOX, Courtesy of BIG © DBOX, Courtesy of BIG © DBOX, Courtesy of BIG +34

Renzo Piano on the Whitney Museum and the Value of Public Space

09:30 - 9 June, 2015
Renzo Piano on the Whitney Museum and the Value of Public Space, © Nic Lehoux
© Nic Lehoux

Throughout his career, Renzo Piano has designed dozens of museum buildings becoming the most prolific museum designer of our time. Yet, it has been some time since one of his designs has been as widely discussed and analyzed as his latest, the Whitney Museum in New York. In this interview, originally published on The Value of Architecture as "A House for Freedom: an Interview with Renzo Piano," David Plick speaks with Piano about the many inspirations of the Whitney Museum, from the previous Whitney Museum by Marcel Breuer to the neighboring High Line, the city on one side and the river on the other.

Renzo Piano is the great champion of public space. Whether the visitors and citizens of the city are aware of it or not, he improves their quality of life by sharing with them a living space designed specifically for the cultivation and dispersion of ideas and the enrichment of civic life. He’s the architect who cares about the individual’s experience of a building, who cares about how people interact with the space, and how the space then interacts with the world. At the Whitney Museum of American Art, much like the Centre Pompidou, or Beaubourg as he would say, he showed this by including a large area in front—a “piazza” he calls it—for people to meet, congregate, chat, and even loiter. He’s somehow simultaneously innovative and selfless. And because of this, he can masterfully fuse form and function, creating beauty for himself because he loves it and thinks it will save people, yet it all means nothing to him if he can’t share in this emotion with others.

The Relationship between the Whitney Museum and the Southern End of the High Line. Image © Nic Lehoux © Nic Lehoux © Nic Lehoux © Nic Lehoux +9

Video: Tadao Ando on Designing His First New York Building

12:44 - 8 June, 2015

"A living space should be a sanctuary. It has to be a place where you can reflect on your life." - Tadao Ando

NOWNESS has released a new video, this time interviewing the legendary Japanese architect Tadao Ando about his first New York building: Ichigoni 152. Planned to replace a parking garage on the corner of Kenmare and Elizabeth Street in Manhattan’s Nolita, the seven-story, seven-residence building aims to embody the energy of living in New York, while maintaining its role a "quite" and "sensitive" place of refuge for its inhabitants. "I would like to create something that only a Japanese person could do," says Ando. "It's about sensitivity."

Video: Pat Vale's Drawing Time-Lapse Brings NYC to Life

08:00 - 5 June, 2015

Back in 2012, we found "Empire State of Pen," an amazing video of London-based artist and animator Patrick Vale’s drawing of Manhattan from the perspective of the Empire State Building. Now, Vale has taken a different perspective of the city, this time traveling a bit farther uptown to the Rockefeller Center area. Vale’s new drawing looks south, with the Empire State Building in the center, and the Freedom Tower in the background. To the east you can see the Chrysler Building, and to the west lies the Bank of America Tower in the Times Square area.

Vale started the drawing in December of 2014, when he spent an afternoon in -15 degree weather sketching and taking pictures, which he then took back to his studio to create the piece. The whole process took over a month to complete. Watch Vale's drawing come to life in the time-lapse video above, and view images of his illustration after the break.

Video: Renzo Piano Reveals the Story Behind the Whitney Museum on Charlie Rose

12:30 - 4 June, 2015

Said to be the most long-awaited museum of the 21st century, the new Whitney Museum of American Art by Renzo Piano officially opened its doors in New York this May after a 30 year endeavor to expand its capacity. An unusual scenario, Charlie Rose sat down with Piano and the museum's director Adam Weinberg to discuss the "remarkable story" behind the expansion and how its design incorporates, what Piano believes to be, seven elements that represent the essence of architecture: social life, urbanity, invention, construction, technology, poetry and light.

We've provided a clip of the talk above. Watch the full 30-minute discussion, after the break. 

10 Highlights from Guardian Cities' "History of Cities in 50 Buildings"

09:30 - 31 May, 2015
10 Highlights from Guardian Cities' "History of Cities in 50 Buildings", Fiat Tagliero, Asmara. Image © Flickr user David Stanley
Fiat Tagliero, Asmara. Image © Flickr user David Stanley

All good things must come to an end, and Guardian Cities' excellent "History of Cities in 50 Buildings" series is sadly no exception, with only a few more left to be published before they hit 50. The whole series is definitely worth the read, bringing in the best of academic and architectural writing from guest authors and the Guardian's own Cities team, but if you're strapped for time - and if you're an architect, it's fairly likely that's true - we've rounded up 10 highlights from the list to get you started.

Amazonas Theatre, Manaus. Image © Wikimedia user Leaderfo Narkomfin Building, Moscow. Image © Wikimedia user NVO Ponte Tower, Johannesburg. Image © Flickr user fiverlocker Byker Wall Estate, Newcastle. Image © Flickr user George Rex +11

The Principals’ Dynamic Sanctuary Pulses in Time to Visitors’ Heartbeats

12:00 - 30 May, 2015
The Principals’ Dynamic Sanctuary Pulses in Time to Visitors’ Heartbeats, © Mike Vorrasi
© Mike Vorrasi

Brooklyn design studio The Principals have completed the Dynamic Sanctuary, an interactive installation at Sight Unseen OFFSITE, during the 2015 NYCxDESIGN festival. Commissioned by Ford Motors, the light-based installation detects and pulses with the biorhythms of its visitors, creating a dynamic space in both name and nature.

The modular installation was manually constructed by The Principals in their Brooklyn studio. Learn more about the project and view selected images after the break.  

© Pippa Drummond © Mike Vorrasi © Pippa Drummond © Pippa Drummond +12

Brooklyn Academy of Music Showcases 5 Murals by Michael Graves

12:43 - 29 May, 2015
Brooklyn Academy of Music Showcases 5 Murals by Michael Graves, © Michael Graves via The New York Times
© Michael Graves via The New York Times

Brooklyn Academy of Music is showcasing five murals by the late Michael Graves as part of the institution's permanent visual art collection. All completed in 1974, the paintings were originally commissioned by Charles Gwathmey - one of the New York Five, along with Graves. And, as the New York Times reports, their "heightened use of color and ornamentation" portray a "general shift away from minimalism." Read more about the murals, here

Step Back in Time with the New York Public Library's "OldNYC" Archive Project

08:00 - 29 May, 2015
Step Back in Time with the New York Public Library's "OldNYC" Archive Project, "Manhattan: 42nd Street (West) - 6th Avenue", Harold Kaye (1931). Image Courtesy of The New York Public Library http://www.oldnyc.org/
"Manhattan: 42nd Street (West) - 6th Avenue", Harold Kaye (1931). Image Courtesy of The New York Public Library http://www.oldnyc.org/

Discover historic New York with "OldNYC," a digital archive of the New York Public Library's "Photographic Views of New York City, 1870s-1970s" Collection. Bringing together an extensive catalogue of images from the library's Milstein Collection, OldNYC organizes photographs geographically, allowing users to view images specific to individual blocks and streets.

The project is also collaborative, asking visitors on the site to comment on photographs with "what's there now, what's changed, and what's stayed the same." Users can edit or add to captions on the back of each of the photos, creating a personal element in the latest retelling of New York's vibrant history.

Learn more about the project and view selected images after the break.

"Bridges - Brooklyn Bridge - Manhattan Bridge - [New York Steam Corporation.]", Percy Loomis Sperr (1934). Image Courtesy of The New York Public Library http://www.oldnyc.org/ "Celebrations - Parades - Municipal events - The Victory Arch.", Unknown (1918). Image Courtesy of The New York Public Library http://www.oldnyc.org/ "Manhattan: 6th Avenue - 42nd Street (West)", Unknown (1939). Image Courtesy of The New York Public Library http://www.oldnyc.org/ "Manhattan: 5th Avenue - 46th Street", Unknown (1931). Image Courtesy of The New York Public Library http://www.oldnyc.org/ +6