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Calvin Seibert Sculpts Impressive Modernist Sandcastles

12:00 - 25 July, 2015
Calvin Seibert Sculpts Impressive Modernist Sandcastles, © Calvin Seibert
© Calvin Seibert

“I always had an affinity for architecture which I attribute to growing up in a neighborhood and town that was constantly under construction. Our house was the first on the block. I think that in a way I was more interested in the abstractness of the foundations and the initial framing then in the completed structures themselves. Things I made back then had that incompleteness about them. As I became more aware of architecture in the wider world Brutalism was one of the styles of the moment. Looking at architecture magazines as a child and seeing hotels in French ski resorts (Marcel Breuer at Flaine) made of concrete suited my sensibility, I was hooked.”

For New York-based Calvin Seibert, sandcastles are more than just a fun summer hobby. Using a paint bucket, homemade plastic trowels, and up to about 150 gallons of water he creates spectacular modernist sandcastles. Read on after the break for an interview with Seibert and to see more photos of his work. 

© Calvin Seibert © Calvin Seibert © Calvin Seibert © Calvin Seibert +17

Steven Holl Architects Breaks Ground on the “Ex of In" House in New York

12:00 - 21 July, 2015
Model. Image Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects
Model. Image Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

Steven Holl Architects has broken ground on the “Ex of In House,” an experimental guest house and artist studio in Rhinebeck, New York. The house is part of the firms’ ongoing research project “Explorations of In,” which questions “current clichés of architectural language and commercial practice” and explores spatial language, energy, openness and public space.

See How Much New York Has Changed Since the 1990s

09:30 - 21 July, 2015
See How Much New York Has Changed Since the 1990s, © G.Alessandrini
© G.Alessandrini

Grégoire Alessandrini’s blog “New York City 1990’s” contains an enormous collection of images taken between 1991 and 1998 that artfully depict New York. The website is a snapshot of New York in the 1990s, capturing the spirit of the era with photographs of New York’s architecture that could only exist at that time. As politics and public sentiment have changed, the city has changed with it, and much of the New York Alessandrini captured no longer exists. 

To document just how much New York has changed in the past 25 years, we have curated a selection of Alessandrini’s images and set each photograph next to a Google Street View window corresponding to the photographer’s location at the time. In the photographs where Alessandrini observes from an elevated vantage point, the Street View images are as close as possible to the photographer’s location.  

Read on after the break to see the images of New York’s dynamic change from the 1990s to 2015. 

Create a Mini Metropolis with Sticky Page Markers

14:00 - 11 July, 2015
Create a Mini Metropolis with Sticky Page Markers, via Duncan Shotton Design Studio
via Duncan Shotton Design Studio

Building a city has never been so easy. With Duncan Shotton Design Studio's Sticky Page Markers you can create your own urban landscape, while marking the pages of your books, catalogues, or notes.

Inés Esnal’s Prism Installation Brings Vivid Colors and Optical Illusions to NYC Lobby

12:00 - 11 July, 2015
Inés Esnal’s Prism Installation Brings Vivid Colors and Optical Illusions to NYC Lobby, Courtesy of Inés Esnal
Courtesy of Inés Esnal

Artist and architect Inés Esnal’s Prism installation uses colorful elastic rope to form triangular spaces that filter light into the lobby of a new residential building in New York.

The installation's vivid colors and optical illusions provide a bold contrast to the concrete walls.

View images and learn more about the project after the break. 

Courtesy of Inés Esnal Courtesy of Inés Esnal Courtesy of Inés Esnal Courtesy of Inés Esnal +17

South Slope Townhouse / Etelamaki Architecture

11:00 - 9 July, 2015
South Slope Townhouse / Etelamaki Architecture, © Mikiko Kikuyama
© Mikiko Kikuyama
  • Architects

  • Location

    Brooklyn, NY, USA
  • Architect in Charge

    Jeff Etelamaki
  • Design Team

    Jeff Etelamaki, Mayumi Tomita, Shenier Torres,
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

© Mikiko Kikuyama © Mikiko Kikuyama © Mikiko Kikuyama © Mikiko Kikuyama +18

Echoing Green / Taylor and Miller Architecture and Design

13:00 - 7 July, 2015
Echoing Green / Taylor and Miller Architecture and Design, © Studio Dubuisson
© Studio Dubuisson

© Studio Dubuisson © Studio Dubuisson © Studio Dubuisson © Studio Dubuisson +21

David Adjaye Unveils Plans for New Studio Museum in Harlem

14:36 - 6 July, 2015
David Adjaye Unveils Plans for New Studio Museum in Harlem, via New York Times / Adjaye Associates
via New York Times / Adjaye Associates

British architect David Adjaye is set to submit plans for new Studio Museum in Harlem. Designed to replace the 47-year-old museum's existing facility on Manhattan's West 125th Street, the new $122 million proposal will more than double the museum's space, allowing it to become a premier center for contemporary artists of African descent. 

According to the New York Times, Adjaye was chosen to design the museum due to his sensitivity regarding the artists and surrounding neighborhood, which in turn inspired the project; the project's main space will feature a four-story, multi-use core marked by an "inverted stoop" that will act as an inviting "living room" and host for public programs. 

“I wanted to honor this idea of public rooms, which are soaring, celebratory and edifying — uplifting,” he told the New York Times. “Between the residential and the civic, we learned the lessons of public realms and tried to bring those two together.”

New York Hall of Science Reopens Great Hall with Renovations from Todd Schliemann

08:00 - 6 July, 2015
New York Hall of Science Reopens Great Hall with Renovations from Todd Schliemann, Opening of Connected Worlds. Image © Andrew Kelly / New York Hall of Science
Opening of Connected Worlds. Image © Andrew Kelly / New York Hall of Science

After renovations by Todd Schliemann of Ennead Architects, the New York Hall of Science’s (NYSCI) Great Hall has reopened to the public, reclaiming its place as the centerpiece of the NYSCI. Originally designed by Harrison and Abramovitz Architects, the Great Hall was the main exhibit space of the Hall of Science during the 1964-1965 World’s Fair, encapsulating visitors in an illusion of deep space with its irregular plan surrounded by undulating glass and concrete walls. Still one of the most formally interesting buildings in Queens, the Great Hall is one of the original World’s Fair’s last surviving structures and a landmark of mid-century modernism.

Cobalt Dalle-de-Verre Panels. Image © Jeff Goldberg / Esto © Jeff Goldberg / Esto Renovations in Progress. Image Courtesy of Ennead Architects Courtesy of Ennead Architects +11

The Whole Building’s a Stage in This Conceptual Cirque du Soleil Theatre Design

08:00 - 5 July, 2015
The Whole Building’s a Stage in This Conceptual Cirque du Soleil Theatre Design , Courtesy of Flying Architecture
Courtesy of Flying Architecture

A team of students from Austrian-based Studio Hani Rashid at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna have unveiled their conceptual design for a Cirque du Soleil Performance Center in Brooklyn, New York.

With its interior and exterior blended together, the entire building becomes a stage. Featuring large windows that allow the public to watch performances and training activities inside, people on each side are both viewers and viewed.

Photographer Max Touhey Gives a Rare Glimpse Inside Eero Saarinen's TWA Flight Center

12:00 - 3 July, 2015
Photographer Max Touhey Gives a Rare Glimpse Inside Eero Saarinen's TWA Flight Center, © Max Touhey for Curbed NY
© Max Touhey for Curbed NY

Currently under renovation in order to turn its soaring shell into a hotel, Eero Saarinen's iconic TWA Flight Center has been off limits to the public since 2001. However last week, while a team of digital preservationists were making scans of the swooping curves of the building's interior, photographer Max Touhey was allowed access, camera in hand, to catalog the building's mid-century elegance. The photoset, published in full on Curbed NY, shows the building in a generally good condition considering its decade-long slumber. Read on after the break for a selection of these images.

© Max Touhey for Curbed NY © Max Touhey for Curbed NY © Max Touhey for Curbed NY © Max Touhey for Curbed NY +10

Pierson’s Way / Bates Masi Architects

09:00 - 3 July, 2015
Pierson’s Way / Bates Masi Architects, © Michael Moran
© Michael Moran

© Michael Moran © Michael Moran © Michael Moran © Michael Moran +15

ODA Unveils Plans for Brooklyn Bridge Park Residential Towers

16:00 - 1 July, 2015
ODA Unveils Plans for Brooklyn Bridge Park Residential Towers, © ODA Architecture
© ODA Architecture

Details have been released on a new residential project designed by ODA Architecture at Brooklyn Bridge Park in New York. Occupying two waterfront sites in the Pier 6 uplands development area, the project will include two10,000-square-foot buildings focused on affordable housing, community development and preserving the surrounding parkland.

COOKFOX Architects' 550 Vanderbilt Condo Opens for Sale

08:00 - 30 June, 2015
COOKFOX Architects' 550 Vanderbilt Condo Opens for Sale, Street View. Image Courtesy of VUW Studio
Street View. Image Courtesy of VUW Studio

COOKFOX Architects’ new project, 550 Vanderbilt Avenue has opened for sale. The 17-storey building will be the first of four condominiums in the 22-acre Pacific Park Brooklyn development in Prospect Heights. The project aims to create a new neighbourhood of 14 buildings, all connected to 8-acres of public green space designed by landscape architecture firm Thomas Balsley Associates. Read more about this project after the break.

New York's Lowline Launch Campaign to Develop the World's First Subterranean Park

04:00 - 30 June, 2015

The New York Lowline, a project which was first announced in 2011 and was rekindled last year, have now launched a Kickstarter campaign in order to make their dream of using solar technology to "transform an historic trolley terminal into the world's first underground park" closer to a reality. Their proposal, which seeks to unlock the potential of underused subterranean urban spaces, would see the creation of a living, green public space built beneath the streets of New York City. They are currently seeking funding to build a long-term solar device testing laboratory and public exhibition in order to test and present their designs.

via Kickstarter via Kickstarter via Kickstarter via Kickstarter +4

Foster + Partners Break Ground on 425 Park Avenue

12:00 - 28 June, 2015
Foster + Partners Break Ground on 425 Park Avenue, 425 Park Avenue, Facing NE on Park Avenue. Image © DBOX for Foster + Partners
425 Park Avenue, Facing NE on Park Avenue. Image © DBOX for Foster + Partners

Norman Foster attended the recent groundbreaking ceremony for 425 Park Avenue, which will be the first full-block high-rise office building to be built on New York City's Park Avenue in the past 50 years. Foster+Partners, in collaboration with Adamson Associates, designed 425 Park to be a new icon in the Manhattan skyline, featuring a tri-blade, sheer wall top. In addition to its LEED Gold certification, the 560,000m² tower will be the first in New York to be WELL certified

Premium Office Space. Image © DBOX for Foster + Partners 425 Park Avenue. Image © Visualhouse for Foster + Partners © Visualhouse for Foster + Partners 425 Park Avenue in Local Context. Image © Visualhouse for Foster + Partners +15

Dror Unveils 3 New Residential Designs for NYC

12:00 - 27 June, 2015
Dror Unveils 3 New Residential Designs for NYC, 100 Varick. Image © Dror
100 Varick. Image © Dror

New York-based studio Dror has unveiled design concepts for three new residential buildings in New York City. The imagined buildings, spread throughout lower Manhattan, are based on the studio’s idea to “disrupt conventional building design by rethinking structure, where beauty and efficiency result from an imaginative, clever framework.”

Learn more about each of the plans, after the break.

Beacons of Pride: #LoveWins in These Illuminated Buildings

15:35 - 26 June, 2015
San Francisco City Hall illuminated in rainbow colors in honor of Pride Week Image © Nickolay Stanev via Shutterstock.com
San Francisco City Hall illuminated in rainbow colors in honor of Pride Week Image © Nickolay Stanev via Shutterstock.com

Earlier today, the US Supreme Court ruled that same-sex marriage should be legal in all 50 states, effectively overruling 14 states that so far have continued to enforce a ban (if you've been on Facebook in the last few hours, you've probably already heard). The ruling comes just in time for Pride Parades which will take place this weekend in many cities, and to celebrate this historic decision, we've rounded up some iconic buildings lit up for past Pride Parades for everybody to enjoy - equally.