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CityVision New York Competition

Courtesy of CityVision magazine
Courtesy of CityVision magazine

CityVision magazine recently announced their CityVision New York competition,  which invites architects, designers, students, artists and creatives to develop urban and visionary proposals with the aim of stimulating new ideas for the contemporary city. Globalization, environmental concerns, new economic and cultural politics, adaptability to the existing context combined with the use of vibrant ideas, original technologies and new softwares for representation are some of the key elements that should be taken into account to formulate the most original project proposal. The submission deadline is June 11. For more information, please visit here.

Emerging New York Architects Competition Proposal / PRAUD


The Emerging New York Architects Competition proposal, ‘The Greenhouse Transformer’, which received an honorable mention, is a typology for urban farming with the purpose of creating environments for learning year round within the community of West Harlem. PRAUD‘s main goal is to integrate life cycle components of food production into a building that is also a catalyst for activity in the area and allows visitors to engage in the program in a more efficient way. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Endangered Monuments Update: Preservation Efforts for the 510 Fifth Avenue Manufactures Trust Company Bank Branch

Manufacturers Trust Company by SOM © Landmarks Preservation Commission
Manufacturers Trust Company by SOM © Landmarks Preservation Commission

ArchDaily previously ran an article about the Manufacturers Trust Company Bank Branch at 510 Fifth Avenue in Manhattan designed by Gordon Bunshaft of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill and interior designer Eleanor H. Le Maire, a building designated as protected under the Landmarks Preservation Commission with first the exterior in 1997 and later the interior in early 2011.  But as recently as October 2011, the building was already listed under the 2012 World Monuments Fund  in the 2012 World Monuments Watch as the current owners, Vornado Realty Trust, began compromising the landmarked conditions of the interior of the building as it was being adapted for reuse.  With preservationists in an uproar, support for the protection of the building was enough to bring Vornado Realty Trust to New York State Supreme Court where a settlement was reached.

Read on for more details on the settlement and continuing efforts to protect endangered monuments.

Community Input Meeting / Friends of the High Line

Are you an avid lover of the High Line? If you’ve been keeping up with our coverage of the project by James Corner Field Operations and DS+R, then you have been following the development of the High Line’s different sections – such as the early stages for a the design of the Gansevoort entrance and elevated street ampitheater of Stage One, and the picture frame and tree fly over of Stage Two.   And, yet the amazing public space is still developing further.  Friends of the High Line are presenting initial design concepts for the rail yards section of the High Line, which requires new zoning that would preserve the entire rail yards section, including the Spur, as public open space.  At a community input meeting on Monday, March 12, the High Line design team will share their visions and answer questions about the soon-to-be newest part of the project.

More information about the meeting after the break.

Studio-X NYC kicks off X-Cities 1: Making the Case for Smart

Tonight, Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) Studio-X NYC welcomes Fast Company’s Greg Lindsay and the Institute for the Future’s Anthony Townsend for the first of a new series of events focused on the “smart city”.

“Lindsay and Townsend are calling the series “X-Cities,” where X marks the spot at which information technology and mega-urbanization converge. In this first session, the pair will lay out their respective cases for the top-down, intelligent design of “smart cities” versus the bottom-up evolution of crowd-sourced “civic laboratories.” Is information technology a real tool for city-building? And, if so, what is its bright and/or scary future?”

This event will begin at 6:30PM at 180 Varick Street in New York. It is free and open to the public. No RSVP is required. Continue reading for more information.

2012 MoMA PS1 YAP Runner-Up: Virtual Water / UrbanLab + endrestudio + Method Design

Courtesy of UrbanLab
Courtesy of UrbanLab

ArchDaily announced the winning proposal for the 2012 MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program (YAP) earlier this month. In order to bring you full coverage of the annual competition, we are featuring the other four creative designs that competed against HWKN’s Wendy. Virtual Water, a collaborative design brought to you by UrbanLab, endrestudio and Method Design, formally manifests what is hidden in plain sight: RAIN. The project reveals and plays with thousands of gallons of summertime rainwater that would otherwise be discarded from the PS1 courtyard.

Virtual Water refers to water hidden in everyday products. A pair of jeans, for example, has a 3000 gallon Virtual Water footprint because 3000 gallons of water are consumed in the various steps of its production chain (growing the cotton, dyeing the fabric, etc).

Courtesy of UrbanLab Courtesy of UrbanLab Courtesy of UrbanLab Courtesy of UrbanLab

Foreclosed: Rehousing the American Dream at the MoMA

Photographs by Don Pollard. © 2011 The Museum of Modern Art.
Photographs by Don Pollard. © 2011 The Museum of Modern Art.

Starting today, through July 30, New York’s Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) will be running an exhibit featuring the proposals of five interdisciplinary studios that were asked to re-think and re-invent the future of housing in the midst of the foreclosure crisis that remains a threat to many Americans and their homes.  Over the Summer of 2011, WORKac, MOS Architects, Visible Weather, Zago Architecture and Studio Gang Architects selected five “megaregions” across the country on which to speculate the form that housing could take: physically, socially and economically.  Late this summer, ArchDaily has provided coverage while the work was in progress. Opening today, the results of those speculative efforts will be presented at the MoMA as part of an exhibit called Foreclosed: Rehousing the American Dream.  The Open Studios exercise was organized by Barry Bergdoll, MoMA’s Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design, with Reinhold Martin, Director of Columbia University’s Temple Hoyne Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture.

Read on for more on the proposals and details about the exhibit.


Together, BIG + Times Square Alliance + Flatcut + Local Projects and Zumtobel celebrates Valentines Day with a BIG red pulsating heart in the middle of Times Square, New York. The 10-foot-tall heart pulsates as the 400 transparent, LED lit, acrylic tubes sway in the wind. Once people touch the heart-shaped sensor, the light grows brighter and the pulse beats faster. Joining hands with more people will increase the intensity of the heart.

“The heart reflects what Times Square is made of: people and light – the more people, the stronger the light,” Bjarke Ingels, Founder & Partner, BIG.

See the love with the video above and more images after the break.

© Ho Kyung Lee © Ho Kyung Lee © David Sundberg ESTO © TSA

Pratt Institute 2012 Spring Lecture Series

Courtesy of Pratt Institute School of Architecture
Courtesy of Pratt Institute School of Architecture

Globally recognized for its distinguished academic reputation and one of the world’s most prestigious independent colleges, Pratt Institute’s School of Architecture will present their spring 2012 lecture series from February 13 through April 9, 2012 at the Institute’s Brooklyn and Manhattan campuses. The lectures are free and open to the public; however, seating priority will be given to current students with Pratt identification. More information on the event after the break.

Video: Brooklyn Bridge / John Roebling / Great Spaces

Check out Great Spaces’ clip on the Brooklyn Bridge, one of New York’s amazing infrastructure feats.  The construction of the bridge was a family affair as it was designed by John Roebling in the late 1860s and then completed by his son and daughter-in-law.  One must imagine New York’s “skyline” of the 1800s to fully understand the innovation and the magnitude of such a massive project.  For more about Roebling’s bridge, be sure to view our AD Classics coverage.

In Progress: Barclays Center / SHoP

Photograph by Roger Edwards.
Photograph by Roger Edwards.

We have been keeping close watch on the progress of Barclays Center, SHoP’s 650,000+ stadium for Brooklyn at Atlantic Yards.  The project has an interesting history as the client, Bruce Ratner, originally looked to Gehry to design an urban solution and iconic image for the 22 acre site, prior to teaming with  Ellerbe Becket and SHoP.   As we’ve reported earlier, SHoP’s response has developed to become a sweeping pre-fabricated volume, with a perforated latticework steel skin and a transparent ground level.   Photographer Roger Edwards has shared some recent photos with us of the construction process as the building is quickly beginning to take shape.

Check out more photos after the break.

'What Is Foreclosed? Housing, Suburbanization, and Crisis' Forum

Courtesy of The Buell Center
Courtesy of The Buell Center

The Buell Center will be hosting a public forum entitled What Is Foreclosed? Housing, Suburbanization, and Crisis, which marks the opening of Foreclosed: Rehousing the American Dream, an exhibition co-organized by the Museum of Modern Art and the Temple Hoyne Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture. The event will take place on Saturday, February 18, 2012, in the Low Memorial Library Rotunda at Columbia University. An interdisciplinary group of scholars, activists, and architects, will debate the future of American housing, cities and suburbs and the cultural narratives that have accompanied the home foreclosure crisis and the economic crisis more generally. More information on the event after the break.

New Building Codes to Meet PlaNYC Goals

Just last week, Mayor Bloomberg and City Council Speaker Christine Quinn enacted 29 new recommendations of the Green Codes Task Force that will provide the proper foundation for New York to meet the aggressive PlanNYC Goals for 2030.  The impact of these new codes is estimated to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 5 percent; lower the energy costs for lighting by 10 percent; save 30 billion gallons of water through better plumbing regulations; treat 15 million gallons of toxic construction water; recycle 100,000 tons of asphalt; and save $400 million in overall energy costs.  The implementation of such codes is the result of the formation of the NYC Green Codes Task Force, an organization led by Urban Green Council, that proposed over 100 recommendations in 2010 to address a wide range of sustainable issues; and, in the two years since that report, the Mayor’s Office and City Council have made 29 of those recommendations law, and are currently working to codify 8 others.

More about the new building codes after the break. 


Courtesy of PATTERNS
Courtesy of PATTERNS

An event marking the publication of P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S’ new book, Embedded brings together authors, contributors, mentors and confabulators to discuss some of the most relevant issues haunting contemporary architectural practice and discourse today, such as the perceived divide between progressive design culture, the politics of form and social responsibility. The event takes place Thursday, February 9th from 6:30-8:30 PM at Studio-X NYC, 180 Varick St. Suite 1610, New York, NY 10014. More information after the break.

modeLab Strip Morphologies III Workshop

Courtesy of Studio Mode / modeLab
Courtesy of Studio Mode / modeLab

Strip Morphologies III is a two-day intensive design, prototyping, and fabrication workshop put on by Studio Mode / modeLab to be held in New York City during the weekend of March 03-04.

Theories of Urban Practice Graduate Program at Parsons The New School for Design

Courtesy of Parsons The New School for Design
Courtesy of Parsons The New School for Design

Launching in fall 2012, Parsons The New School of Design is offering a new graduate program in urbanism in New York City, the MA Theories of Urban Practice. The 2-year, 36-credit research-oriented program is designed for those who want to transform cities through actionable research, strategic knowledge, and critical theories. In other words, knowledge can transform cities! The program will redefine urbanism and urban design as a field of transformative practice.

Flashback: Hearst Tower / Foster and Partners

  • Architects: Foster and Partners
  • Location: Midtown Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA
  • Architect: Foster and Partners
  • Project Design: Norman Foster
  • Structural Engineer: WSP Cantour Seinuk
  • Construction: Turner Construction
  • Area: 0.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2006
  • Photographs: Chuck Choi, Courtesy of foster and partners

© Chuck Choi © Chuck Choi © Chuck Choi Courtesy of foster and partners

The Reece School / Platt Byard Dovell White Architects

  • Architects: Platt Byard Dovell White Architects
  • Location: 25 East 104th Street, New York, USA
  • Architects: Platt Byard Dovell White Architects
  • Project Team: Charles A. Platt, AIA, Design Principal; Ray H. Dovell, AIA, Design Principal; Elissa Icso, AIA, Project Manager; Steven Dodds, Project Architect; Matthew Mueller, AIA, Naomi Touger, Tim Gaiennie
  • Cost: $8.4 million
  • Client: The Reece School
  • Project Year: 2006
  • Photographs: Jonathan Wallen

© Jonathan Wallen © Jonathan Wallen © Jonathan Wallen © Jonathan Wallen