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Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY Installations Transform INRIA

Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY has realized two permanent installations - “Under Stress” and “Sous Tension” - in the public areas of the Department of Computer Science at the French Institute for Research in Computer Science and Automation (INRIA). Both structures “utilize programming techniques inherent in computer science to optimize the form and creating a pattern on the surface.”  

“The structures engage the spaces with their intricate and gestural movements that effortlessly travel over the areas,” says the practice. “They provide visitors with iconic hubs for informal and spontaneous social gatherings while expressing the tension between the dynamic interactions from the multi-directional and converging paths within the public spaces. More than a signal for the school, they become elements of enhancement for the school's identity.”

© Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY - Under Stress © Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY - Under Stress © Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY - Sous Tension © Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY - Sous Tension

Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY Constructs Self-Supported “Vaulted Willow” with Ultra-Thin Aluminum Shells

The Edmonton Arts Council has commissioned Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY to construct an “architectural folly” in the Canadian city’s Borden Park. The project, known as “Vaulted Willow,” aims to “resolve and delineate structure, skin and ornamentation into a single unified system” by “exploring lightweight, ultra-thin, self-supported shells through the development of custom computational protocols of structural form-finding and descriptive geometry.”

© Marc Fornes & THEVERYMANY © Marc Fornes & THEVERYMANY © Marc Fornes & THEVERYMANY Nested Parts. Image © Marc Fornes & THEVERYMANY

nonLin/Lin Pavilion / Marc Fornes

© Francois Lauginie
© Francois Lauginie

Designed by Marc Fornes (THEVERYMANY), nonLin/Lin Pavilion is a prototype which engages in a series of architectural experiments referred to as text based morphologies. Part of the FRAC Centre permanent collection in Orleans, France the prototypes, beyond their visual perception of sculptural and formal qualities, are built forms developed through custom computational protocols. The parameters of these protocols are based on form finding (surface relaxation), form description (composition of developable linear elements), information modeling (re-assembly data), generational hierarchy (distributed networks), and digital fabrication (logistic of production). A complete project description, photographs and drawings following the break.

© Francois Lauginie © Francois Lauginie © Francois Lauginie © Francois Lauginie