Spanish Builders Forget to Resize Skyscraper Elevator

Image via Gizmodo

Standing tall as a “striking symbol of hope and prosperity,” the Intempo skyscraper in , Spain is missing one essential component: a working elevator. Although the towers’ have been riddled with issues from the start, its “over-excited” developers decided to double the structure’s original height from 20 to 47 stories. Unfortunately, the expansion was realized without the appropriate recalculation of its elevator system, leaving little space for larger lifts and motor equipment that would naturally be required for a taller building. Since, the project’s architects,  have resigned and it is unclear as to how the developers will overcome the issue.

Reference: Gizmodo, El Pais

New Technology May Double the Height of Skyscrapers

Dubai Skyline; Flickr User rickz; Licensed via Creative Commons

Finnish elevator manufacturer KONE has unveiled a new hoisting technology that will enable to travel heights of one kilometer – twice the distance than currently possible.  The new development implies that the Burj Khalifa, whose longest elevator travels a distance of 504 meters, will not remain the world’s tallest building for very long.

Join us for more after the break.

A Brief, Interesting History of the Otis Elevator Company

Otis are in the Burj Khalifa in Dubai, the world’s tallest building at 2,722 ft. Image © Emaar properties.

What do the Eiffel Tower, the Empire State Building, the Kremlin, and the Burj Khalifa have in common?

Elevators from the Otis Elevator Company. The company, which is celebrating its 160th anniversary today, has an interesting history: it was founded in 1853, the year Elisha Otis invented the elevator safety brake. Before Otis’ invention, buildings rarely reached seven stories (elevators were considered just too dangerous to implement).

But it was Otis’ elevator that would allow for the creation, and proliferation of, the skyscraper – an explosion that would for ever alter the 20th and 21st century skylines.

Read more about the Otis Elevators influence on skyscraper design (and how Otis performed a death-defying feat to increase the invention’s popularity), after the break…

The Evolution of Elevators: Accommodating the Supertall

Ping An Finance Center © KPF

Elevators have been around for quite a long time; maybe not those that soar to hundreds of feet in a matter of seconds, but the primitive ancestors of this technology, often man-powered, were developed as early as the 3rd century BC.  These early wheel and belt operated platforms provided the lift that would eventually evolve into the “ascending rooms” that allow supertall skyscrapers (above 300 meters) to dominate skylines in cities across the world. Elevators can be given credit for a lot of progress in architecture and urban planning.  Their invention and development allowed for the building and inhabiting of the structures we see today.

are becoming more common as cities and architects race to the top of the skyline, inching their way further up into the atmosphere.  These buildings are structural challenges as engineers must develop building technologies that can withstand the forces of high altitudes and tall structures.  But what of the practical matter of moving through these buildings?  What does it mean for vertical conveyance?  How must elevators evolve to accommodate the practical use of these supertall structures?