Le Corbusier, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, and Their Flights of Fancy

(Left) Antoine de Saint-Exupéry in Alghero, Sardinia, May 1944, (Right) leaning against his Plan Voisin. Image © (Left) The John and Annamaria Phillips Foundation, (Right) Fondation

This article by Avinash Rajagopal, originally published in Metropolis Magazine as ‘The Little Prince’ and Le Corbusier investigates the link between Le Corbusier and Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, writer of The Little Prince.

On October 22, 1929, a French architect got on the inaugural flight of the Aeroposta Argentina, a pioneering airline service that flew from Buenos Aires to Asuncion del Paraguay, flown by a French co-pilot. The act of flying would deeply influence the creative output of both passenger and pilot.

The former, of course, was Le Corbusier. The latter was Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, later to be famous as the creator of The Little Prince (1943), the well-beloved tale of a planet-hopping, fox-befriending, flower-loving space child.

Read on after the break for more about the pair

Drawing Shadows by Gautam Bhatia

Courtesy of Gautam Bhatia

Gautam Bhatia is an architect based in New Delhi and one of the most well-known architectural writers in India, having written for The TimesOutlook magazine and Indian Express.

We live today the way we do because we know no other. Our lives fit the defined patterns of homes, streets, neighborhoods, cities. As an architect I try to understand and explore – through drawing – different possibilities of building and landscape. More and more, drawing has taken me away from the conventions of architecture, into more abstract realms. Drawing has helped define space as it doesn’t exist, and perhaps as it should. Not in a utopian way, but one that tries merely to describe a different way we may live.

Ten Spectacular Drawings Win RIBA’s “Eye Line” Competition

© Tom Noonan

The results of RIBA Journal’s recent competition, Eye Line, are in. Top of the pile was Tom Noonan‘s drawing “Reforestation of the Thames Estuary,” part of his Master’s Thesis project at the Bartlett School of Architecture; however, the range of styles and content mean that there’s something for everyone in the top ten. Read the full article and see all the drawings here.

All the Buildings in New York…Drawn by Hand

Courtesy of James Hancock

ALL THE BUILDINGS IN NEW YORK is a blog, a book, and, above all, illustrator James Gulliver Hancock’s love letter to New York City.

As his website reveals, Hancock “panics that he may not be able to draw everything in the world… at least once.” Since Kindergarten, he’s been obsessed with drawing in meticulous detail (or, as he tells the Atlantic Cities, with a mix of “technicality and whimsy”), a characteristic this native Australian brought with him when he moved to Brooklyn, New York.

What began as a blog, All The Buildings In New York, to keep track of his many of New York’s architecture (particularly the brownstones), is now a book (All The Buildings in New York: That I’ve Drawn So Far - which includes about 500 drawings). Organized by neighborhoods, it features New York architectural icons from the past and present, including the Chrysler Building, the Flatiron, Apple’s 5th Avenue store, as well as the everyday buildings that make up New York’s unique cityscape.

See more images from All the Buildings in New York, after the break…

Michael Graves: In Defense of Drawing

© , Denver Central Library

In his Op-Ed for The Times, called “Architecture and the Lost Art of Drawing,” American architecture legend Michael Graves laments the loss of drawing in our computer-dependent age. While Graves realizes the usefulness of computer technology to present a final product, he maintains that the act of sketching (particularly those first, fleeting “referential sketches”) is vital to the process of design:

“Architecture cannot divorce itself from drawing, no matter how impressive the technology gets. Drawings are not just end products: they are part of the thought process of architectural design. Drawings express the interaction of our minds, eyes and hands. This last statement is absolutely crucial to the difference between those who draw to conceptualize architecture and those who use the computer.”

Do you think the art of drawing is actually lost? Is drawing vital to the work you do? Or has technology become so sophisticated that it has “rendered” sketching unnecessary?

Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

Story via The New York Times

 

Video: 3D Drawing Machine

Two young artists Ryan and Trevor Oakes have introduced a unique way for drawing using a 3D that assists in re-presenting the view in front of one’s eyes. The machine was developed as an exploration of the nature of vision with a goal to recreate realism in the correct proportions and perspective. The artists explain how the machine works; by limiting vision of the scene to one eye and the other to plot the image on concave paper, an illusion occurs where the paper becomes transparent, rendering an effect that you are simply tracing the scene in front of you.  It is an interesting take on creating artwork with amazingly accurate results. Check out the video for their presentation.