AD Interviews: Andrew Maynard / Andrew Maynard Architects

At the World Architecture Festival, we sat down with Andrew Maynard, co-director of Australian architecture firm Andrew Maynard Architects.

Maynard is known for his polemical projects, like CV08 robot, which wanders through the , consuming houses and replacing them with trees and other natural vegetation. “It’s got nothing to do with trying to achieve a built outcome, it’s about actually reacting against the economic machine,” Maynard said, regarding his polemical work.

He is also known for his interaction with media and discussion of critical issues such as Work/life/work balance, which became one of ArchDaily’s top 5 most read pieces ever. In this interview, Maynard tells us about his firm’s “intentionally small size,” how he approaches innovation, and the theory behind his polemical projects.

Andrew Maynard Architects are the brains behind projects such as Butler House, Vader House, Tattoo House and Hill House.

Nebula / Andrew Maynard Architects

Courtesy of

Architects: Andrew Maynard Architects
Location: Melbourne,
Area: 62 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Courtesy of Andrew Maynard Architects, Nic Granleese

Moor Street Residence / Andrew Maynard Architects

© Peter Bennetts

Architects: Andrew Maynard Architects
Location: Fitzroy, VIC,
Design Team: Andrew Maynard, Mark Austin
Year: 2012
Photographs: Peter Bennetts

Venice Biennale 2014: Australia to Showcase 11 Unbuilt Projects

Tower Skin. Image ©

’s creative team for the 2014 Venice Architecture Biennalefelix._Giles_Anderson+Goad, has announced 11 unrealized projects that will be showcased as part of the Augmented Australia 1914-2014 exhibition. Ranging from an inner-city cathedral to a treetop activist shelter, the country-wide selection of projects will be brought to life using three-dimensional augmented models, images, voice overs and animations.

AD Interviews: Advice for Young Architects

Since ArchDaily started, we have interviewed close to two hundred architects to understand the diversity of our profession, and to give you insights from the most successful practices in the world.

Here is a round up with excerpts from some of these interviews, focusing on advice for the young architects.

Watch Bjarke Ingels, Charles Renfro, Einar Jarmund, Ma Yansong, Sam Jacob, Jim Eyre, and Andrew Maynard share their advice with the ArchDaily community!

House House / Andrew Maynard Architects

© Peter Bennetts

Architects: Andrew Maynard Architects
Location: Richmond, VIC,
Architect In Charge: Andrew Maynard, Mark Austin
Building Surveyor: Anthony Middling & Associates
Engineer: Coulthard Shim P/L
Builder: Sargant Constructions
Year: 2012
Photographs: Peter Bennetts, Michael Ong

Hill House / Andrew Maynard Architects

© Nic Granleese

Architects: Andrew Maynard Architects
Location: , Victoria, Australia
Team: , Mark Austin, Tommy Joo
Building Surveyor: Metro Building Surveying
Engineer: Robin Bliem & Associates
Builder: Ficus Constructions
Landscaping: Bonnie Grant
Year: 2012
Photographs: Nic Granleese, Courtesy of Andrew Maynard Architects

Work/life/work balance by Andrew Maynard

Courtesy of

Australian architect Andrew Maynard, co-director of Andrew Maynard Architects, has shared with us his article “Work/life/work balance”, published first on Parlour. “Many women leave the profession due to the difficult combination of poor work cultures, long hours and low pay. But these conditions affect everyone – women and men – as well as the viability of the profession as a whole. Andrew Maynard sets out the issues and challenges the profession to end exploitative and exclusionary working practices.”

It is time for architectural work practices to grow up. We must stop deluding ourselves that architectural employees are anything other than a contemporary exploited labor force.

Epicurus argued that humans needed only three things in life to be happy – friends, freedom and an analyzed life. All evidence indicates that Epicurus had a rather good time while he was around. Now he is dead. I wonder if Epicurus became a senior associate at Philosopher & Associates Pty Ltd before he died? Surely this was a priority. Does contemporary architectural employment deny us our happiness; our friends, freedom and the opportunity for an analyzed life? Many would argue that being employed in architecture and the pursuit of happiness are irreconcilable. It can reasonably be argued that most architects, and almost all recent graduates, are working in conditions that are unhealthy, unsustainable and exploitative.

Continue reading after the break. 

Ilma Grove / Andrew Maynard Architects

© Kevin Hui

Architects: Andrew Maynard Architects
Location: Northcote, Australia
Engineer: R Bliem & Associates
Building Surveyor: Building Strategies
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Kevin Hui

Mash House / Andrew Maynard Architects

 Kevin Hui

The approach taken for the Mash House is one which celebrates outdoor space. The original double-fronted Victorian house offered a plethora of challenges including limited solar access. In predictable fashion, services had been attached to the rear of the dwelling over time, effectively dislocating the living areas from the backyard. A belt of space to the east of the house laid bare where a driveway once existed. An old shed, stretching the width of site, sat idly to the rear. These elements combined, meant the overriding feel of the house was one of disconnection.

The design by Andrew Maynard Architects offers a sound, simple solution to a rather challenging site. The concept was driven by obtaining passive efficiency, via shrewd siting and orientation. Quality insulation, ample double-glazing and in-slab heating all combine to make this home a sustainable exercise in modern house renovation.  Sketches and photographs of Mash House following the break.

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Architects: Andrew Maynard Architects
Location: North , Melbourne,
Project Team: Andrew Maynard, Mark Austin, Matthew McClurg
Builder: Z & I Pelaic Builders
Project Area: 85 sqm (new works) 67 sqm (works to existing)
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Kevin Hui

Butler House / Andrew Maynard Architects

© Kevin Hui

Nestled within the undulated roofline of one of Fitzroy’s famed MacRobertson warehouses, sits a roof terrace with a difference – complete with canopy and turf. This, the vertical and architectural pinnacle of the Butler House, fills the void that effects so many inner-city dwellings – a lack of outdoor space. Further to this, the warehouse apartment had a number of innate thermal and acoustic shortcomings – making it less-than-ideal for occupancy by a family with 2 rambunctious young boys. Balancing intimacy with privacy came to be a significant consideration for this young family and is achieved via shrewd adaptability of spaces.

Architects: Andrew Maynard Architects
Location: Fitzroy, Melbourne,
Project Team: Andrew Maynard, Mark Austin, Tommy Joo
Project Area: 85 sqm (new works) 44 sqm (works existing)
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Kevin Hui

AD Round Up: Andrew Maynard Architects

Andrew Maynard Architects was established in 2002 following Andrew’s receipt of the grand prize in the Asia Pacific Design Awards for his Design Pod. We’ve been featuring several houses of this Australian office, all of them in the state of Victoria.

1Vader house
Emerging from behind its high boundary wall, the distorted roof form of Vader House interrupts the symmetrical roof line typical of Fitzroy, and breathes new life into this Victorian Terrace. The extension is a framed steel skeleton which envelopes the unusually high masonry boundary wall built prior to height restrictions (read more…)

2Tattoo House
The Tattoo house is Andrew Maynard’s latest built project. The building is a small extension to an existing 3 bedroom house in Fitzroy North, Victoria. The client’s brief was delightfully loose; provide new living and kitchen space for a growing young family and create an open plan with plenty of natural light and high ceilings (read more…)

3Barrow House
The Barrow extension appears as an arrangement of timber boxes, each independently rotated and subjected to varying amounts of extruding and manipulating forces. These separate actions result in a variety of shapes, which united, create an interior of differing volumes and organizations, providing an interesting double story (read more…)

4Anglesea House
For ‘ latest design, a holiday home in Anglesea VIC, the clients’ requirement was simple: more space for their growing and aging family. With the need of the client always in mind, set out to create a multi-generational vacation home whose “versatility…allows it to be inhabited (read more…)

5Beachcroft Orth Residence
Andrew Maynard Architects present this residential alteration and extension to an existing double fronted weatherboard house in Melbourne, . The brief required 2 bathrooms, a bedroom, living area, kitchen and increased connection with outside areas. The context is typical of inner suburban Melbourne (read more…)

Beachcroft Orth Residence / Andrew Maynard Architects

Andrew Maynard Architects present this residential alteration and extension to an existing double fronted weatherboard house in , Australia. The brief required 2 bathrooms, a bedroom, living area, kitchen and increased connection with outside areas.

Anglesea House / Andrew Maynard Architects

For Andrew Maynard Architects‘ latest design, a holiday home in Anglesea VIC, the clients’ requirement was simple: more space for their growing and aging family.   With the need of the client always in mind, set out to create a multi-generational vacation home whose “versatility…allows it to be inhabited simultaneously by all members of the extended family…The design is rigorously addressed at different scales, allowing there to be a certain level of connection and interaction throughout while also providing smaller zones where solace can be found.”

More information and images after the break.

Barrow House / Andrew Maynard Architects

Architects: Andrew Maynard Architects
Location: ,
AMA Team: Mark Austin
Project year: 2008
Builder: Clynton Banner
Landscape: Glashaus nursery and design
Builder: Clynton Banner
Budget: $500,000
Photographs: Peter Bennetts

Tattoo House / Andrew Maynard Architects

Andrew Maynard Architects shared with us the Tattoo house located in Victoria, Australia. It features a interesting way to filter light and views. Architect’s description, more photographs and drawings after the break.

CV08, the suburb-eating robot

Peak oil is approaching. In the next future, most of the oil-dependent suburbs in which we live now will be abandoned and decay, turning into ruins, inhabited only by the few ones who where too fat and too car-dependent to escape back to the city. Little by little, nature will take over suburbs, but this process will be extremely slowly.

In order to give Mother Nature a hand, Andrew Maynard Architects have designed CV08, the suburb-eating robot.

Vader house / Andrew Maynard Architects

Architects: Andrew Maynard Architects
Location: ,
AMA Team: Andrew Maynard, Mark Austin, Matthew McClurg
Project year: 2008
Constructed Area: 120 sqm
Budget: $500,000
Photographs: AMA