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Urban Design for an Urban Century: Shaping More Livable, Equitable, and Resilient Cities

01:00 - 21 June, 2014
Urban Design for an Urban Century: Shaping More Livable, Equitable, and Resilient Cities, Courtesy of Wiley
Courtesy of Wiley

In Urban Design for an Urban Century: Shaping More Livable, Equitable, and Resilient Cities (2nd Edition), by Lance Jay Brown, David Dixon, historical trends and practices are used to explain current theories of urbanism. The following excerpt illustrates one such historical trend, detailing exactly how the advent of railroads and skyscrapers following the Industrial Revolution radically changed the urban landscape.

Before the Industrial Revolution, forces such as trade, agriculture, and defense determined the shape of cities in North America and Europe, whether planned or unplanned. How far a person could reasonably walk and the requirements of carts, wagons, and herds of animals heavily influenced the layout and dimensions of city streets regardless of the form the larger city took. Defensive strategy and technology also dictated form, but the resulting walls — and the need to guard them — often imposed smaller footprints than cities might otherwise have produced.

Prado House / CoA arquitectura + Estudio Macías Peredo + TAAB

01:00 - 21 June, 2014
Prado House / CoA arquitectura + Estudio Macías Peredo + TAAB, © Francisco Gutiérrez Peregrina
© Francisco Gutiérrez Peregrina

© Jaime Navarro © Francisco Gutiérrez Peregrina © Francisco Gutiérrez Peregrina © Francisco Gutiérrez Peregrina +19

Emerging Practices in India: Abin Design Studio

01:00 - 21 June, 2014
International Management Institute, Bhubaneswar: Library from the courtyard. Image Courtesy of Abin Design Studio
International Management Institute, Bhubaneswar: Library from the courtyard. Image Courtesy of Abin Design Studio

Indian Architect & Builder, through a two-part series titled ‘’ (Volumes I and II), delves deeper into contemporary Indian practices that have carved a unique identity and place for themselves in the country today. This article, part of the first volume of the series takes a closer look at ‘Abin Design Studio’, a Kolkata-based architectural firm.

In a city that, though culturally rich, has remained fairly neglectful of contemporary architectural developments, Abin Design Studio’s dynamic philosophy attempts to trigger a ‘think revolution’ by challenging the conventional and recreating the city-scape of Kolkata. Abin Design Studio was founded in October 2005 by Abin Chaudhuri, who partnered with Jui Mallick in 2006. What started off as a small three-person firm is now a frontline organisation rendering complete design solutions from conceptualisation to realisation of space, object and visual.

The projects have a strong spatial quality which fuse lessons from past traditions with aspirations of the present in a sparkling coup of energy. Their passion to transform and nerve to challenge is almost incomparable. Indian Architect & Builder’s interview with the founders, after the break…

Istanbul Disaster Prevention and Education Centre, Istanbul: Competition entry. Image Courtesy of Abin Design Studio International Institute of Management, Kolkata: Process sketch. Image Courtesy of Abin Design Studio School of Architecture & Planning, Bhopal: View of the academic block. Image Courtesy of Abin Design Studio International Management Institute, Bhubaneswar: View from the administrative block. Image Courtesy of Abin Design Studio +33

T-Boutique / Studio Pha

01:00 - 21 June, 2014
T-Boutique / Studio Pha, © Filip Šlapal
© Filip Šlapal

© Filip Šlapal © Filip Šlapal © Filip Šlapal © Filip Šlapal +12

Nagyerdo Football Stadium / BORD

01:00 - 21 June, 2014
© Tibor Olah
© Tibor Olah
  • Architects

  • Location

    Debrecen, Hungary
  • Architect in Charge

    Peter Bordas
  • Co-ordinating architect

    Robert Benke
  • Design Team

    Robert Gulyas, Gabriella Gaspar, Annamaria Holovits, Tamas Mezey, Timea Szabo, Julia Szendroi,Tamas Tolvaj, Annamaria Toth, Kata Zih
  • Area

    7000.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

© Tibor Olah © Tamas Bujnovszky © Tamas Bujnovszky © Tamas Bujnovszky +52

Make It Right Unveils 5 New Designs for Housing in Fort Peck Reservation

00:00 - 21 June, 2014
Make It Right Unveils 5 New Designs for Housing in Fort Peck Reservation, LivingHomes' Design. Image Courtesy of Living Homes
LivingHomes' Design. Image Courtesy of Living Homes

Make It Right, the organization founded by Brad Pitt to provide housing to those in need, has unveiled 5 designs for their new initiative in the Fort Peck Indian Reservation in Montana. The designs - by GRAFT, Sustainable Native Communities Collaborative, Architecture for Humanity, Method Homes and Living Homes - are inspired by cradle-to-cradle principles, will be LEED Platinum rated and have been developed alongside community consultation with the Sioux and Assiniboine tribes of Fort Peck.

The organization is planning to build 20 new homes on the reservation, as well as developing a sustainable masterplan for the entire 3,300 square mile reservation, with construction planned to start later this year.

More on the development of Make It Right's Fort Peck initiative after the break.

Method Homes' Design. Image Courtesy of Method Homes Sustainable Native Communities Collaborative's Design. Image Courtesy of Make It Right Architecture For Humanity's design. Image Courtesy of Make It Right GRAFT's Design. Image Courtesy of GRAFT +5

A.B House / Andrade Morettin Arquitetos Associados

01:00 - 21 June, 2014
© Nelson Kon
© Nelson Kon
  • Architects

  • Location

    São Paulo, Brazil
  • Design Team

    Marcio Tanaka, José Paulo Gouvêa, Marcelo Maia Rosa, Marina Mermelstein, Merten Nefs, Renata Andrulis, Thiago Natal Duarte
  • Area

    1364.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2008
  • Photographs

© Nelson Kon © Nelson Kon © Nelson Kon © Nelson Kon +19

Soft Shells - Porous and Deployable Architecture

00:00 - 21 June, 2014
Soft Shells - Porous and Deployable Architecture , Courtesy of Sophia Vyzoviti and BIS Publishers
Courtesy of Sophia Vyzoviti and BIS Publishers

Cut, Pleat, Tile, Weave. Four principles guide every project in the publication Soft Shells - a new publication that features porous, deployable, expandable and retractable architecture. Keep reading after the break to see two of the featured projects, but make sure to check out the full book here.

House in Kitaoji / Torafu Architects

01:00 - 21 June, 2014
House in Kitaoji  / Torafu Architects, © Daici Ano
© Daici Ano

© Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano © Daici Ano +23

'What's Your Favorite Space?' Video Competition Winners

00:00 - 20 June, 2014

Building Pictures, a Portuguese website specialized in architecture videos, decided to celebrate the year of Portuguese architecture by creating a competition inviting architects, artists, designers, directors, and students to submit their favorite spaces. 31 videos answered the challenge and shared their experiences and inspiring places. The jury selected three winners, whose beautiful videos can be seen after the break.

Video: “about architecture_without capital letters” / Alejandro Beautell

00:00 - 20 June, 2014

As part of "Time Space Existence" at the Venice Biennale -- the exhibition which has brought over 100 architects, including Norman Foster, Eduardo Souto de Moura, and Ricardo Bofill, together -- the young Spanish architect, Alejandro Beautell, presents the installation: "about architecture_without capital letters."

Beautell's video, which explores his recent works completed in the Canary Islands (including ArchDaily 2014 Building of the Year, St. John Baptist Chapel), provokes the viewer to consider the essence of architecture, smaller scales, and the tradition inherent in the architectural profession.

Enjoy the video above and make sure to revisit Beautell's stunning Building of the Year, the St. John Baptist Chapel.

House for Trees / Vo Trong Nghia Architects

01:00 - 20 June, 2014
House for Trees / Vo Trong Nghia Architects, © Hiroyuki Oki
© Hiroyuki Oki

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki +19

  • Architects

  • Location

    Tan Binh District, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
  • Architects in Charge

    Vo Trong Nghia, Masaaki Iwamoto, Kosuke Nishijima
  • Area

    226.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

Wooden House CM / Bruno Vanbesien + Christophe Meersman

01:00 - 20 June, 2014
Wooden House CM / Bruno Vanbesien + Christophe Meersman, © Tim Van de Velde
© Tim Van de Velde

© Tim Van de Velde © Tim Van de Velde © Tim Van de Velde © Tim Van de Velde +32

Vitra Campus Adds A Viewing Tower With a Slide

00:00 - 20 June, 2014
Vitra Campus Adds A Viewing Tower With a Slide, Vitra Slide Tower / Carsten Höller. Image © Vitra
Vitra Slide Tower / Carsten Höller. Image © Vitra

Adding to the world-famous collection of buildings and structures at its campus in Weil am Rhein, Vitra has just unveiled its latest project, a viewing tower and slide designed by Carsten Höller. Located on the Alvaro Siza-designed promenade linking Herzog & de Meuron's Vitrahaus with Zaha Hadid's Fire Station, the new tower offers two ways to see the Vitra Campus as never before: from above, looking out over the other buildings at the tower's viewing platform; and on the dizzying descent, as the transparent roof to the slide gives fleeting views of the buildings around you.

More on the Vitra Slide Tower after the break

Vitra Slide Tower / Carsten Höller. Image © Vitra Vitra Slide Tower / Carsten Höller. Image © Vitra Vitra Slide Tower / Carsten Höller. Image © Vitra Vitra Slide Tower / Carsten Höller. Image © Vitra +8

The Machine in the Ocean: On The Petropolis of Tomorrow

01:00 - 20 June, 2014
The Machine in the Ocean: On The Petropolis of Tomorrow

Clocking in at just under six hundred pages, Neeraj Bhatia and Mary Casper’s The Petropolis of Tomorrow (Actar, 2013) presents a series of dueling monstrosities—land and sea; ecology and industry; isolation and circulation—at the hard-edged site of their collision. The product of an intensive research studio directed by Bhatia at the Rice School of Architecture, Petropolis documents and explores Brazil’s rapidly developing network of offshore petroleum and natural gas drilling infrastructures as a site ripe for the deployment of architectural expertise and imagination. Conducted as part of a broad collaborative research investigation on resource extraction urbanism initiated by the South America Project (SAP), the studio, as introduced by SAP Co-Director Felipe Correa, is a speculative experiment that “tests an extreme scenario” with the aim of identifying “new hybrids between industry and urbanism for an alternative twenty-first century extraction town.” Complementing the studio work, the editors have marshaled an impressive array of text and photo contributors whose essays offer distinctive takes on the book’s three thematic threads: archipelago urbanism, harvesting urbanism, and logistical urbanism.

Headquarters of the Complex of Nationally Relevant Laboratories for the Safety of Foods / AGM

01:00 - 20 June, 2014
Headquarters of the Complex of Nationally Relevant Laboratories for the Safety of Foods / AGM, © Vladimir Popović
© Vladimir Popović

Courtesy of Borislav Petrović © Vladimir Popović Courtesy of Borislav Petrović Courtesy of Borislav Petrović +21

  • Architects

  • Location

    Batajnica, Belgrade, Serbia
  • Architect in Charge

    Marjan Đulinac, Borislav Petrović, Ivan Rašković, Aleksandar Tomić and Nada Jelić, Aleksandar Kostić
  • Area

    5200.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2007
  • Photographs

    Vladimir Popović, Courtesy of Borislav Petrović

Biblioteca Antonio Gala / Francisco López + Gudula Rudolf

01:00 - 20 June, 2014
Biblioteca Antonio Gala  / Francisco López  + Gudula Rudolf, © Fernando Alda 
© Fernando Alda 

© Fernando Alda  © Fernando Alda  © Fernando Alda  © Fernando Alda  +10

The Ten Most Impressive Engineering Projects of All Time

00:00 - 20 June, 2014
The Ten Most Impressive Engineering Projects of All Time, Courtesy of Civil Engineering Program, Norwich University
Courtesy of Civil Engineering Program, Norwich University

For time immemorial, humanity has sought to outdo itself architecturally, building longer tunnels, taller towers, and stronger walls. Now, the Master in Civil Engineering program at Norwich University has compiled a definitive top ten list of these impressive structures. In the following infographic, you’ll find some familiar entries - such as the Great Wall of China and the Hoover Dam - as well as some lesser known greats, like the Qingdao Haiwan Bridge. Spanning over 2000 years of architectural ingenuity and invention, this list is sure to teach you something new about the most impressive engineering projects of all time.