OMA's Santa Monica Scheme Re-evaluated

00:00 - 8 September, 2013
© OMA
© OMA

In July the Office for Metropolitan Architecture's (OMA) competition proposal for a mixed-use development in the heart of downtown Santa Monica was recommended by City Council members after they "seemed genuinely wowed by OMA's theatrically-terraced design." City officials have since voted to re-evaluate the recommendation over concerns of a lack of affordable housing in the development, as well as issues "related to design [and] economics." They have also invited Related California, a team comprising of BIG, Koning Eizenberg Architecture, and Rios Clementi Hale Studios, to revise its original proposal that was shortlisted in March of this year.

San Antonio Hacienda / Dionne Arquitectos + Posada Arquitectos

01:00 - 7 September, 2013
© Patrick López Jaimes
© Patrick López Jaimes
  • Architects

    Dionne Arquitectos, Posada Arquitectos
  • Location

    Cholula de Rivadavia (San Pedro Cholula), Puebla, Mexico
  • Architect in Charge

    Fred Dionne, Juan Ignacio Posada
  • Collaborators

    Rodrigo Martínez, Elizabeth Cortes, Antonio Carpio, Francisco Baxin, Hugo García.
  • Construction

    Posada Arquitectos
  • Project Year

    2012
  • Photography

    Patrick López Jaimes, Courtesy of Dionne Arquitectos

© Patrick López Jaimes © Patrick López Jaimes Courtesy of Dionne Arquitectos Courtesy of Dionne Arquitectos +21

AUT Lecture Theatres / RTA Studio

01:00 - 7 September, 2013
© Simon Devitt
© Simon Devitt

© Simon Devitt © Simon Devitt © Simon Devitt © Simon Devitt +7

BNL Bibliothèque Nationale de Luxembourg / BOLLES+WILSON

01:00 - 7 September, 2013
Wood model interior. Image © Tomasz Samek
Wood model interior. Image © Tomasz Samek

In 2003, BOLLES + WILSON won a national competition that gained them commission of the new Luxemburg National Library (BnL Bibliothèque Nationale de Luxembourg). After years of hibernation, the 39,000 square meter library will break ground in 2014. 

Follow us after the break for more analysis on the library...

dnA House / BLAF Architecten

01:00 - 7 September, 2013
© Stijn Bollaert
© Stijn Bollaert

© Stijn Bollaert © Stijn Bollaert © Stijn Bollaert © Stijn Bollaert +10

Friendship Centre / Kashef Mahboob Chowdhury/URBANA

01:00 - 7 September, 2013
© Eric Chenal
© Eric Chenal

© Anup Basak © Eric Chenal © Eric Chenal © Eric Chenal +15

Recycle step by step / Dom Arquitectura + Asa Studio

01:00 - 7 September, 2013
© Jordi Anguera
© Jordi Anguera

© Jordi Anguera © Jordi Anguera © Jordi Anguera © Jordi Anguera +12

China Now, from Nowness

00:00 - 7 September, 2013

China Now on Nowness.com

In the latest video from Nowness, director Thomas Rhazi documents the complicated architectural scene in China - focusing on how the country holds onto its identity despite the "frenetic" pace of its expansion and globalization. Shaway Yeh sums up the situation nicely: "what does China really look like, what does China represent? No one knows, because it's a place that's still in flux, it's constantly reshaping." Lyndon Neri, however, points to Pritzker Prize winner Wang Shu as a possible answer, saying that he "created something quite amazing in Ningbo, it had a new way of looking at a building in a Chinese way... what he actually did was a modern interpretation of Chinese architecture." No matter where you stand on China's modernization, the video is a beautiful depiction of the historical meeting the modern.

Winners Proposals Suggest Alternatives for San Francisco's 280 Freeway

01:00 - 7 September, 2013
Fieldshift by Erik Jensen and Justin Richardson. Image Courtesy of The Center for Architecture + Design
Fieldshift by Erik Jensen and Justin Richardson. Image Courtesy of The Center for Architecture + Design

The Center for Architecture + Design and the Seed Fund announced the winners of the Reimagine. Reconnect. Restore What if 280 came down?, a competition that explored the idea of removing San Francisco's 280 Freeway, north of 16th Street,  in an effort to pedestrianize that portion of the city while generating funds for several regionally important transit projects. The open competition, which encouraged designers to submit urban design interventions, from public art to infrastructure, awarded $10,000 in prizes. 

The Stadiums of the Three Runners for the 2020 Olympics: Tokyo, Madrid and Istanbul

00:00 - 7 September, 2013
Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects
Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects

UPDATE: Minutes ago Tokyo was announced as the host of the 2020 Olympics. Zaha Hadid’s design to become the Olympic stadium.

Today the International Olympic Comitee (IOC) will choose the city that will host the 2020 Olympics, with Madrid, Tokyo and Istanbul competing for the important event. The three cities just finished their presentations in Buenos Aires, Argentina, including presidents and royal members. As we await for the results, we present you the three stadiums designed to host the Olympics in each city.

More information and images:

What is Architecture? Steven Holl Describes It In Four words

00:00 - 7 September, 2013
© ArchDaily
© ArchDaily

"While artists work from the real to the abstract, architects must work from the abstract to the real.

Same Time Zone, Different Standards

01:00 - 7 September, 2013
Foreground: Pavilion by Tom Wiscombe Design, Middleground: Textile Room Pavilion by P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S at The Museum of Contemparary Art, Los Angeles. Image © Taiyo Watanabe
Foreground: Pavilion by Tom Wiscombe Design, Middleground: Textile Room Pavilion by P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S at The Museum of Contemparary Art, Los Angeles. Image © Taiyo Watanabe

The Getty’s Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A. hosted A. Quincy Jones: Building for Better Living at UCLA’s Hammer Museum and Contemporary Architecture from Southern California (formerly known as A New Sculpturalism) at MOCA Geffen for the better part of this summer. These two exhibits, on view until September 8 and 16 respectively, give us insight into Los Angeles’ past and present architectural legacies. They take on fundamentally different challenges. One uncovers a prolific and primary history of a modernist architect, the other attempts to capture and catalogue an unwieldy and unstable present.

Read on after the break for reviews of both exhibitions...

Tempera Pavilion by Atelier Manferdini at The Museum Of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Image © Taiyo Watanabe Drawdle 01-03, 2012-13 by Morphosis Architects at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Image © Taiyo Watanabe Exhibition of A. Quincy Jones: Building for Better Living at UCLA Hammer Museum. Image © Brian Forrest A. Quincy Jones and Frederick E. Emmons, Architects.  Fairhaven Tract Eichler Homes Model LJ-124, Orange, California, 1961. Image © Jason Schmidt +10

WG Sasbach / Amann|Burdenski|Munkel Architekten

01:00 - 6 September, 2013
© Yohan Zerdoun
© Yohan Zerdoun

© Yohan Zerdoun © Yohan Zerdoun © Yohan Zerdoun © Yohan Zerdoun +13

Voila House / Fabian Tan Architect

01:00 - 6 September, 2013
© Eiffel Chong
© Eiffel Chong

© Eiffel Chong © Eiffel Chong © Eiffel Chong © Eiffel Chong +30

Founders of Architecture for Humanity Step Down, Launch Five-year Plan

00:00 - 6 September, 2013

“It's great to see something you started evolve into an institution. We are excited about the future of the organization and plan to continue lending support in whatever ways we can.” Kate Stohr, co-founder

Architecture for Humanity founders, Kate Stohr and Cameron Sinclair, will step down after 15 years of leading the San Francisco based non-profit organization to focus on new ventures. Upon leaving, they have drafted a five year strategic vision, reiterating the organization's purpose and needed areas of improvement. Matt Charney, Board President of Architecture for Humanity, is confident that 'Kate and Cameron's vision and years of dedication leaves the organization in a solid place." To further expand operations, board directors will begin an international search for a new executive director by the end of September.

Honeybee Lounge / poly.m.ur

00:00 - 6 September, 2013
© Kyungsub Shin
© Kyungsub Shin
  • Architects

  • Location

  • Design Team

    Seungjun Oh, Sunki Whang, Jaeho Song, Hyunju Lim, Jiin Kim
  • Area

    208.02 sqm
  • Project Year

    2012
  • Photographs

    Kyungsub Shin, Megabox

© Megabox © Kyungsub Shin © Kyungsub Shin © Megabox +28

EPR House / Luis Aldrete

01:00 - 6 September, 2013
© Paco Pérez Arriaga
© Paco Pérez Arriaga
  • Architects

  • Location

    Zapopan, JAL, Mexico
  • Project Architects

    Luis Aldrete, Cynthia Mojica
  • Project Area

    460.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2011
  • Photography

© Paco Pérez Arriaga © Paco Pérez Arriaga © Paco Pérez Arriaga © Paco Pérez Arriaga +16

How to Bring China's Ghost Towns Back to Life

00:00 - 6 September, 2013
The empty development of Kangbashi/Ordos in Inner Mongolia (China). Image © Tim Franco, Flickr User shanghaisoundbites
The empty development of Kangbashi/Ordos in Inner Mongolia (China). Image © Tim Franco, Flickr User shanghaisoundbites

In this article, originally published in Metropolis Magazine's Point of View blog as "The Real Problem with China's Ghost Towns" , author Peter Calthorpe explains the problems of these cities, predicts their grim future, and explores how the thoughtful planning behind the city of Chenggong could provide a more sustainable alternative. 

 We’ve all seen the reports on “ghost town” developments in China, showing acres of empty high-rise apartments and vacant shopping malls. These barren towns seem particularly ironic in a country planning to move 250 million people from the countryside to cities in the next 20 years. But this massive, unprecedented demand has been distorted by a number of factors unique to China. Flawed financial incentives for cities and developers, along with the poor phasing of services, amenities, and jobs create most of the problems. In addition, China’s emerging middle class is very comfortable (perhaps too comfortable) investing in real estate, so people often buy apartments in incomplete communities but don't move in, expecting that values will rise, or that they will live there someday. The result is a string of large, empty developments that remain speculative investments rather than real homes and communities. [See-through buildings are the worry now, but the real problems may come when they are full.]

While it’s hard to get data on vacancy levels in China, there are certainly many anecdotal examples across the country. An all-too-typical example is Chenggong, the new town planned for 1.5 million just outside of Kunming in the west. This freshly minted city boasts the growing Yunnan University, currently with 170,000 students and faculty; a new government center; and an emerging light industrial area. Under construction are the city’s new high-speed rail station and two metro lines connecting the historic city center.