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Victor Horta: The Latest Architecture and News

The Work of Victor Horta, Art Nouveau's Esteemed Architect

06:00 - 28 June, 2018
© Henry Townsend
© Henry Townsend

Situated throughout Brussels, Victor Horta's architecture ranges from innocuous to avant-garde. While many of his buildings were completed in the traditional Beaux Arts style, it is Horta’s Art Nouveau works—most of them built as townhouses for the Belgian elite—that are most beloved. Emerging from the decorative arts tradition and, in some ways, anticipating the coming onslaught of modernism, Horta’s Art Nouveau buildings were erected during a fleeting decade: roughly 1893 to 1903.

© <a href=‘https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Fachada_Casa_Estudio_V%C3%ADctor_Horta.jpg#/media/File:Fachada_Casa_Estudio_V%C3%ADctor_Horta.jpg'>Creative Commons user estebanhistoria</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>  © <a href=‘https://www.flickr.com/photos/martinehrenhauser/8085701304'>Flickr user Martin Ehrenhauser </a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> © <a href=‘https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8d/Belgique_-_Bruxelles_-_Maison_Horta_-_02.jpg'>Creative Commons user EmDee</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 4.0</a>  © <a href=‘https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Belgique_-_Bruxelles_-_H%C3%B4tel_Van_Eetvelde_-_18.jpg'>Creative Commons user EmDee</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 4.0</a> + 19

AD Classics: Hôtel van Eetvelde / Victor Horta

04:00 - 1 February, 2017
AD Classics: Hôtel van Eetvelde / Victor Horta, Courtesy of Wikimedia user Zinneke (licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0)
Courtesy of Wikimedia user Zinneke (licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0)

To the contemporary observer, the flowing lines and naturalistic ornamentation of Art Nouveau do not appear particularly radical. To some, Art Nouveau may even seem to be the dying gasp of 19th Century Classicism just before the unmistakably modern Art Deco and International Styles supplanted it as the design modes of choice. The Hôtel van Eetvelde, designed in 1897 by Victor Horta—the architect considered to be the father of Art Nouveau—suggests a different story. With its innovative spatial strategy and expressive use of new industrial materials, the Hôtel van Eetvelde is a testament to the novelty of the “New Art.”

Courtesy of Wikimedia user Zinneke (licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0) Courtesy of Flickr user T P (licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) Courtesy of Wikimedia user Koenvde (Public Domain) This street front comprises typical Brusselian townhouses: narrow, multilevel, and highly individualistic in their ornamentation. ImageCourtesy of Flickr user Steve Cadman (licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0) + 6

AD Classics: Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes

04:00 - 19 August, 2016
AD Classics: Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, The Exposition’s poster, designed by Robert Bonfils. ImageCourtesy of the Victoria and Albert Museum
The Exposition’s poster, designed by Robert Bonfils. ImageCourtesy of the Victoria and Albert Museum

The end of the First World War did not mark the end of struggle in Europe. France, as the primary location of the conflict’s Western Front, suffered heavy losses in both manpower and industrial productivity; the resulting economic instability would plague the country well into the 1920s.[1] It was in the midst of these uncertain times that the French would signal their intention to look not to their recent troubled past, but to a brighter and more optimistic future. This signal came in the form of the Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes (International Exposition of Decorative Arts and Modern Industries) of 1925 – a landmark exhibition which both gave rise to a new international style and, ultimately, provided its name: Art Deco.

Courtesy of Wikimedia user François GOGLINS (Public Domain) Courtesy of Wikimedia user François GOGLINS (Public Domain) Horta’s Belgian Pavilion was a radical departure from his typically curvilinear Art Nouveau style. ImageCourtesy of Wikimedia user François GOGLINS (Public Domain) Courtesy of Wikimedia user François GOGLINS (Public Domain) + 14