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Pop Up Architecture: The Latest Architecture and News

SOM Designs COVID-Responsive Pop-Up School

Global design practice Skidmore, Owings & Merrill have created a modular pop-up classroom in response to COVID-19. Called School/House, it was inspired by its traditional single-room namesake and responds to the key challenges of density, air circulation, and flexibility in schools. The rapidly deployable classroom system addresses social distancing, health, and safety during the pandemic while also provides learning space during renovations or rapid growth.

School/House. Image Courtesy of Skidmore, Owings & MerrillSchool/House. Image Courtesy of Skidmore, Owings & MerrillSchool/House. Image Courtesy of Skidmore, Owings & MerrillSchool/House+ 6

The "Minima Moralia" Provides Affordable, Customizable Studio Space

With its overblown rental market and the rising costs of tertiary education, London is turning from a city that welcomed creative individuals to one that locks them out. Boano Prišmontas believe that "creativity should not be linked to social status," and the way to counter this is through the creation of affordable spaces. As a response, they have created the "Minima Moralia"; a compact, modular steel frame assembly with infinite possibilities for customization.

Yale Students Propose a Series of Pop-Up Religious Buildings to Sustain Culture in Refugee Camps

The theme for this year’s Venice Biennale is largely an invitation for architects and designers to expand and think beyond architecture’s traditional frontiers and to respond to a wider range of challenges relating to human settlement. With news of political crises continuing to fill the headlines of late, Aravena’s theme challenges architects to respond. One such response comes from Lucas Boyd and Chad Greenlee from the Yale School of Architecture. They believe that:

While [places of worship] do not provide a basic need for an individual’s biological survival, they do represent a fundamental aspect of not only an individual’s life beyond utility, but an identity within the collective, a familiar place of being—and this is something that we consider synonymous with being human—a requirement for the persistence of culture.

The two students came up with proposal designs on churches, synagogues and mosques that can be quickly built as “Pop-Up Places of Worship” in refugee camps. By presenting immediately-recognizable sacred spaces that are transportable and affordable, Boyd and Greenlee highlight spaces for worship as an absolute necessity in any type of human settlement. Through this process, the students also determine what, for them, is “necessary” in a religious structure.

Courtesy of Lucas Boyd and Chad GreenleeCourtesy of Lucas Boyd and Chad GreenleeCourtesy of Lucas Boyd and Chad GreenleeCourtesy of Lucas Boyd and Chad Greenlee+ 16