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Mapping: The Latest Architecture and News

Matt Daniels Maps World Populations as Mountains

04:00 - 4 January, 2019
Matt Daniels Maps World Populations as Mountains, Human Terrain. Image Courtesy of Matt Daniels
Human Terrain. Image Courtesy of Matt Daniels

Engineer Matt Daniels has created a new interactive map to visualize the world's populations. Called 'Human Terrain', the project includes extruded block-by-block population data for cities across the world to give viewers fine-grain insight into population distribution. Daniels used data from the Global Human Settlement Layer and processed it using Google Earth Engine to create a mountainous digital landscape.

BDA Prize 2019: INVISIBLE C'VILLE

06:01 - 21 November, 2018
BDA Prize 2019: INVISIBLE C'VILLE, BDA Prize 2019: INVISIBLE C'VILLE
BDA Prize 2019: INVISIBLE C'VILLE

The BDA Prize, an annual design and ideas competition, exists to generate forward-looking ideas to better our community through design and dialogue.

This Online Tool Generates High-Quality Geographic Maps of Data in Seconds

09:30 - 21 October, 2017

Have you ever had to create a map for your project, thinking you could get it done within 30 minutes, but then spent an entire afternoon on it? Between collecting data, creating a base map, choosing a color scheme, and finally putting together a graphic, creating a map can be a long, trying process, taking up precious time when you could be doing other work. Map-making shouldn’t be this way.

Created by Darkhorse Analytics, mapinseconds.com is a free online productivity tool which generates clear, quality maps based off of your data. Here’s how it works: collect and organize your data into two columns on either an Excel or Google spreadsheet, open mapinseconds.com, paste your data into the application’s spreadsheet, and voila! Your custom map is finished!

Citymapper, World-Renowned Urban Mobility App, Launches London's First Pop-Up Bus Route

08:30 - 9 May, 2017
Citymapper's new buses in central London. Image Courtesy of Citymapper
Citymapper's new buses in central London. Image Courtesy of Citymapper

Citymapper, which is just over five years old, has become the go-to mobility app for the majority of the world's major cities. It's strength lies in its accuracy and integration: the app parses local data and always seems to deliver the fastest route, even in comparison to its leviathan, data-rich competitors – Google Maps and Apple Maps. Having always focused their attention on public transport, as opposed to cars and taxis, Citymapper has become embedded into the way large amounts of urbanites navigate cities both familiar and foreign. As of today, they are building buses—and bus routes—of their own.

Courtesy of Citymapper Courtesy of Citymapper The CMXI bus route. Image Courtesy of Citymapper The CMXI bus route. Image Courtesy of Citymapper + 8

Cut Maps Adds Contemporary Precision to Cartographic Objects

16:15 - 3 June, 2016
Cut Maps Adds Contemporary Precision to Cartographic Objects , Oak State Art, Ohio. Image Courtesy of Cut Maps
Oak State Art, Ohio. Image Courtesy of Cut Maps

Have you ever wanted to decorate your walls with old-style maps but been discouraged because they don't fit your minimal and contemporary aesthetic? Enter Cut Maps, the Virginia-based company that creates cartographic representations of cities and states using laser technologies to precisely define borders and streets. The resultant maps offer the illusion of their paper precedents, but with an otherworldly precision only possible in the digital age.

How Infrastructure Segregates Cities

18:00 - 24 July, 2015
How Infrastructure Segregates Cities, via The Washington Post
via The Washington Post

The Washington Post has published a piece looking at how infrastructure acts as a form of segregation in cities in the US. Using racial dot maps from the University of Virginia’s Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, they show how highways, railroads, historically uncrossable avenues, and similar urban design decisions have a huge impact on the physical isolation of different races. These types of infrastructure were also found to reinforce boundaries set by natural patterns of topography and bodies of water. Cities found to have clear infrastructural segregation include Pittsburgh, Hartford, DetroitWashington, D.C., and Milwaukee. Read the full article, here.