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Laser Scanning: The Latest Architecture and News

New Technologies Might Save Venice’s Cultural Heritage from the Floods

Factum Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to the use of digital technology for cultural heritage conservation, in collaboration with the Fondazione Giorgio Cini, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) and Iconem have recorded the Island of San Giorgio Maggiore, in Venice, Italy, in its entirety. For more than 10 days, the team using photogrammetry and LiDAR technologies scanned the 10-hectare island. The project entitled ARCHiVe, linked with EPFL's Venice Time Machine aims to “efficiently and effectively aid in the preservation of Venice's fragile cultural heritage”.

Point cloud of the Longhena staircase, extracted from photogrammetry data. Image Courtesy of Factum FoundationTonal map image of the entire island of San Giorgio, generated from a 6.000 million point cloud. Height and depth are represented using colours ranging from red to blue. . Image Courtesy of Factum FoundationMap showing a few of the 600 scanning spots across the island of San Giorgio . Image Courtesy of Factum FoundationThe altar of the basilica of San Giorgio, recorded with a LiDAR scanner. © Otto Lowe. Image Courtesy of Factum Foundation+ 29

CyArk Captures Culture and Preserves History in the Face of ISIS in Syria

This article was originally published in Redshift and is republished here with permission.

In 2001, the Taliban destroyed the Buddhas of Bamiyan in central Afghanistan using dynamite, anti-aircraft guns, and artillery. After weeks of incremental destruction, nothing of the statues remained.

That sad turn of events was the impetus for the founding of CyArk, a nonprofit that uses technology to ensure sites of rich cultural heritage remain available to future generations. Since 2003, they have used laser scanning, photography, photogrammetry, and 3D capture to record nearly 200 sites around the globe.

Timescanners: Digital Scanners Explain Historic Architecture's Engineering Mysteries

Thanks to state of the art mobile laser scanners, scientists can now document the greatest architecture in history, from The Pyramids to St. Paul's Cathedral, as digital models with pinpoint accuracy. The digital representations take you inside, around and through the buildings, which means researchers can study and analyze sites without being in the field. The technology is already proving its worth - watch the trailer above to see how Petra was constructed and more!