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Autodesk Redshift: The Latest Architecture and News

How Modular Construction Could Offer a Lasting Solution in the Affordable Housing Crisis

07:00 - 15 March, 2019

This article was originally published in Autodesk's Redshift publication as "How Building Modular Homes can Help Fill the Affordable Housing Gap."

“Modular” isn’t a construction product; it’s a construction process. This is according to Tom Hardiman, executive director of the Modular Building Institute (MBI), whose members include more than 350 companies involved in the manufacturing and distribution of modular buildings, including multifamily homes.

Allied Works' New Museum in Columbus is Designed for the History of The Future

09:30 - 4 January, 2019
Allied Works' New Museum in Columbus is Designed for the History of The Future, © Aerial Impact Solutions, via Autodesk Redshift
© Aerial Impact Solutions, via Autodesk Redshift

This article was originally published by Autodesk's Redshift publication as "Design and History Join Forces at the National Veterans Memorial and Museum."

In the years before his death, the late Marine, astronaut, and US Senator John Glenn had a vision to create a place of gathering and remembrance for veterans of all conflicts. It would not be a traditional war memorial or military museum, but a place that would honor veterans and promote civic discourse, sharing stories of service through interactive exhibits, oral histories, images, and personal artifacts.

The Do-It-Yourself Vertical Village on the Fringes of London

09:30 - 10 December, 2018
The Gantry at HERE EAST / Hawkins Brown. Image
The Gantry at HERE EAST / Hawkins Brown. Image

This article was originally published by Autodesk's Redshift publication.

In East London, The Trampery on the Gantry is doubling down on the “creative” aspect of creative reuse. Part of the massive broadcast center used during the 2012 Olympic Games, the former HVAC gantry structure has been retrofitted by architecture firm Hawkins\Brown as an arts and media innovation hub.

Using Architecture to Create a New Civic Movement: SHoP's Chris Sharples Speaks

09:30 - 3 October, 2018
Using Architecture to Create a New Civic Movement: SHoP's Chris Sharples Speaks, Courtesy of SHoP Architects
Courtesy of SHoP Architects

This article was originally published by Autodesk's Redshift publication as "SHoP's Chris Sharples on Urban Architecture, Digital Fabrication, and the Public Realm."

Twin brothers Chris and Bill Sharples are two of the founding partners of SHoP Architects, a New York-based firm established 20 years ago to bring together diverse expertise in designing buildings and environments that improve the quality of public life.

The firm’s style is difficult to define, but a connective thread throughout SHoP’s portfolio is a design philosophy rooted in constraints. From digital models to next-generation fabrication and delivery techniques, technology is at the center of the firm’s movement toward an iterative approach that, as Chris Sharples says, “is beginning to blur the line between architecture and manufacturing.”

Courtesy of SHoP Architects © SHoP Architects and West8 © Bruce Damonte Courtesy of SHoP Architects + 8

Mind the Gap: Minimizing Data Loss Between GIS and BIM

09:30 - 6 August, 2018
Mind the Gap: Minimizing Data Loss Between GIS and BIM, via Wikimedia. ImageDom Luis Bridge / Porto, Portugal
via Wikimedia. ImageDom Luis Bridge / Porto, Portugal

An unfortunate fact of the AEC (architecture, engineering, and construction) industry is that, between every stage of the process—from planning and design to construction and operations—critical data is lost.

The reality is, when you move data between phases of, say, the usable lifecycle of a bridge, you end up shuttling that data back and forth between software systems that recognize only their own data sets. The minute you translate that data, you reduce its richness and value. When a project stakeholder needs data from an earlier phase of the process, planners, designers, and engineers often have to manually re-create that information, resulting in unnecessary rework. 

How to Bring Construction into the Future

09:30 - 3 August, 2018
How to Bring Construction into the Future, Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects. ImageOne Thousand Museum high-rise residential building in Miami, Florida, will feature a curving exoskeleton finished with glass fiber-reinforced concrete.
Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects. ImageOne Thousand Museum high-rise residential building in Miami, Florida, will feature a curving exoskeleton finished with glass fiber-reinforced concrete.

This article was originally published by Autodesk's Redshift publication as "The 4 Forces That Will Take on Concrete and Make Construction Smart."

When it comes to building a bridge, what prevents it from having the most enduring and sustainable life span? What is its worst enemy? The answer is, simply, the bridge itself—its own weight.

Built with today’s construction processes, bridges and buildings are so overly massed with energy and material that they’re inherently unsustainable. While concrete is quite literally one of the foundations of modern construction, it’s not the best building material. It’s sensitive to pollution. It cracks, stains, and collapses in reaction to rain and carbon dioxide. It’s a dead weight: Take San Francisco’s sinking, leaning Millennium Tower as an example.

Modern, smart construction can and will do better. A convergent set of technologies will soon radically change how the construction industry builds and what it builds with.