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Assemble Architects: The Latest Architecture and News

Architecture’s Most Inspiring Leaders, Projects & People in 2015

14:30 - 17 December, 2015
Architecture’s Most Inspiring Leaders, Projects & People in 2015

5,000 3D cameras to help preserve the architecture of a country torn by war; A team of Latin American architects that moved into Venezuela’s most dangerous neighborhoods in order to design and build with the community; A legendary architect who understood architecture’s relationship to the transformation of technology -- and whose projects have celebrated technology across a trajectory of multiple decades. These are the projects, initiatives and people who have proven to be leaders in 2015.

ArchDaily’s editorial team wanted to recognize these projects for their commitment to promoting practices in architecture that serve many, in all corners of the globe -- from Bolivia to London, from Chicago to Venice, from public spaces in favelas to projected drone-ports in Africa. These are the stories that have inspired us in 2015, and whose influence we hope to continue to see into 2016.

Assemble Awarded the 2015 Turner Prize for Granby Four Streets

04:50 - 8 December, 2015
 Assemble Awarded the 2015 Turner Prize for Granby Four Streets, Design for a winter garden in a derelict home in Granby Four Streets. Image Courtesy of Assemble
Design for a winter garden in a derelict home in Granby Four Streets. Image Courtesy of Assemble

Assemble, a London-based collective who "work across the fields of art, design and architecture to create projects in tandem with the communities who use and inhabit them," have been announced as the winners of the 2015 Turner Prize – Europe’s most prestigious contemporary visual art award. Their nomination was a surprise to many, not least because an architect (or architecture collective, in this case) has not been shortlisted before. Previous winners—some of whose work has intersected with the world of architecture—include Gilbert & George, Anish Kapoor (known for the Orbit at the 2012 London Olympic Games), Antony Gormley, Damien Hirst, Gillian Wearing and Grayson Perry (a collaborator on FAT's final built work).

The Cineroleum / Assemble. Image Courtesy of Assemble Yardhouse / Assemble. Image Courtesy of Assemble Items produced by the Granby Workshop to raise regeneration funds. Image Courtesy of Assemble Items produced by the Granby Workshop to raise regeneration funds. Image Courtesy of Assemble + 11

From Derelict Structure to Urban Cinema

01:00 - 6 August, 2014
From Derelict Structure to Urban Cinema, Courtesy of Assemble
Courtesy of Assemble

The Cineroleum, a self-initiated project built in 2010 by London based practice Assemble Studio, transformed a derelict petrol station into a "hand-built" cinema on one of capital's busiest roads. Aimed at raising awareness to the wider potential for reusing the 4,000 empty petrol stations across the UK for public use, the adapted structure on Clerkenwell Road was "enclosed by an ornate curtain" strung from the "roof of the petrol station's forecourt. Described as an "improvisation of the decadent interiors that greeted audiences during cinema’s golden age," classic infusions of cinematic iconography were integrated into a space built from only cheap, reclaimed or donated materials.

Courtesy of Assemble Courtesy of Assemble Courtesy of Assemble Courtesy of Assemble + 20

Assemble Architects and the Coming-of-Age of the Pop-Up Project

00:00 - 9 July, 2014
Assemble Architects and the Coming-of-Age of the Pop-Up Project, The Cineroleum, a temporary cinema in a disused petrol station. Image © Flickr CC User John Gordy
The Cineroleum, a temporary cinema in a disused petrol station. Image © Flickr CC User John Gordy

In his interesting profile of the young London-based practice Assemble, Rowan Moore of the Observer investigates the work of arguably the best collective of designers to emerge from 2010's "Autumn of Pop-Ups" - examining how they have stayed true to the more noble aspects of pop-up architecture despite the concept's increasing commercialization. From their first project, a temporary cinema in a petrol station, to their recent Yardhouse project in Stratford, Moore finds an architecture that values exuberance and fun, yet is mature and refined. You can read his article in full here.