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Serious Question: What Are the Limits Of Rendering In the Architectural Design Process?

What is a render? Is it just an image to win over clients and competitions? Or is it an effective tool for the building design process?

Not Experienced with Rendering? 4 Techniques you Can Use Instead

If there is any word that describes what architectural renders look like nowadays, it would be: impressive. The immense world of rendering has allowed people to engage in virtually-built environments, exploring each space and experiencing what they might hear or feel as they walk by one room to another without being physically present in the project.

3 Examples that Prove Real-Time Rendering is more than a Visualization Tool

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Real-time rendering is the fastest and easiest way to turn building models into immersive 3D experiences. It empowers the creative process by enabling designers to generate, document, and visualize simultaneously from one model.

ArchDaily Topics - April: Rendering

During this month we will discuss from a critical perspective the meaning of rendering for architecture. What are the models and what are the limits of rendering in the design process of a building?. And from this perspective ask ourselves what is a rendering? It is just an image to win competitions and prospects clients. Or is it an effective tool for the construction process?

The Last Shall Be First: The Importance of Human Figures in Renders

In architecture, professionals must constantly deal with the challenge of representing a project clearly and understandably before it is built, making the space somehow more perceptible to people who are often not specialized in the field. Rendering is one of the most popular methods of three-dimensional representation among architects because it portrays the project more realistically. Reality, however, implies the presence of people and their ways of inhabiting spaces, which can be depicted through human figures, that must be coherent with the intended picture and interpretation of the architecture, the place it is located in, and the way it is inhabited.