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Alejandro Echeverri: The Latest Architecture and News

Architecture Guide to Medellín: 20 Places that Every Architect Should Visit

In 2013, Medellín (Colombia) was declared the most innovative city in the world as part of the City of the Year Competition, organized by the Wall Street Journal. It competed alongside metropolises like New York and Tel Aviv.

Although it may seem strange, this distinction is not so out there. The Antioquian capital has become one of the most advanced technological and intellectual epicenters in Colombia, not to mention the important urban development that has occurred in the city since the beginning of 2010.

The city’s mobility-orientated integrated infrastructure together with interventions of high social impact have turned Medellín into the center of the debate on the growth and development of Latin American cities. 

In the following 20 projects, tell you the story of a city that bet on urban consolidation through quality public spaces and projects that encouraged citizen management by supporting the development of marginalized areas in a process of social reconstruction, where architecture has played an important role as a spatial formulation tool.

MAMM extension/ Ctrl-G + 51-1 Arquitectos. Image © Manuela Bonilla New office of the Urban Development Company/ EDU - Empresa de Desarrollo Urbano de Medellín. Image © Alejandro Arango Plaza de Cisneros / Juan Manuel Peláez Freidel + Luís Fernando Peláez. Image © Juan Manuel Peláez Freidel Civic Centre Liberty Plaza / OPUS + Toroposada Arquitectos. Image © Sergio Gómez + 21

Winners Announced for 2013 Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design

The Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD) has announced the 11th Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design award winners: Eduardo Souto de Moura’s Metro do Porto in Porto, Portugal, and the Northeastern Urban Integration Project in Medellín, Colombia.

When commenting on the significance of the two prize-winning projects, jury member Micahel Sorkin stated: "If there are lessons to be drawn for urban design from Medellín and Porto, I think the broader lesson has to do with the disruption of the segregation of the disciplines in the design field. Historically we have understood that Landscape Architecture sits in one place, Architecture in another, and Urban Design and Planning [in another, with all three disciplines] in constant conflict about their territorial rights. One of the things that is revolutionary about the Medellín project is that distinguishing among the disciplines is no longer possible."

More about the prize-winning projects, courtesy of the GSD: