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Matthew Millman

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California Meadow House / Olson Kundig

© Matthew Millman
© Matthew Millman

© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman+ 23

Woodside, United States
  • Architects: Olson Kundig
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  17000 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2017
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: AutoDesk, Firestone Building Products, PentalQuartz, Richlite, Spearhead, +13

Mountain Wood House / Walker Warner Architects

© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman+ 24

Woodside, United States
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  5100 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2010
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: VMZINC, Walker Zanger, Custom Furniture Design, Hope’s Steel and bronze Windows and Doors, McEwen Lighting Studio, +3

Kalihiwai Pavilion / Walker Warner Architects

© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman+ 30

Moscone Center Expansion / Skidmore, Owings & Merrill + Mark Cavagnero Associates

© Tim Griffith© Tim Griffith© Cesar Rubio© Matthew Millman+ 16

Makani Eka Residence / David Shutt Architecture + Walker Warner Architects

© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman+ 29

Kailua-Kona, United States

Laurel Hills Residence / Assembledge+

© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman+ 48

Los Ángeles, United States

How to Make a Facade with Recycled Materials: 21 Notable Examples

Cortesía de MAPCortesía de Project.DWG + LOOS.FMCortesía de Wang Shu, Amateur Architecture Studio© Quang Tran+ 43

With the aim of supporting architects to become active agents of sustainable design, this week we present a selection of facades that incorporate different recycled materials. Beyond the typical uses of plastic and glass, in this article, you will find innovative materials such as mattress springs, ice cream containers, plastic chairs, and recycled waste from agricultural and industrial products. A look at 21 remarkable projects using recycled materials to create an attractive facade.

House of Light / Rangr Studio

© Joe Fletcher© Joe Fletcher© Matthew Millman© Joe Fletcher+ 24

Berkeley, United States

Riverbend Residence / CLB Architects

© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman+ 60

San Francisco Design Week Launches as Virtual Festival

The 14th Annual San Francisco Design Week (SFDW) is returning this year as a virtual design festival. The all-online program kicks off June 15-25 with the theme “Intentional Distortions." Over 150 participating Bay Area and West Coast design firms are joining the event with original ideas and creative solutions to help businesses survive in a post-pandemic world.

Dogtrot House / CLB Architects

© Audrey Hall© Audrey Hall© Matthew Millman© Audrey Hall+ 16

25 Projects Merged into the Diverse Landscape of California

Martis Camp 506 / Blaze Makoid Architecture. Image Cortesía de Blaze Makoid ArchitectureC-Glass House / Deegan Day Design. Image © Taiyo WatanabeOff-Grid Guest House / Anacapa. Image © Erin FeinblattMcElroy House _ Ehrlich Architects / Ehrlich Yanai Rhee Chaney Architects. Image © Miranda Brackett+ 26

Located in the western region of the United States, the state of California is the most populous state and the third-largest — it includes some of the most populated cities of the country such as Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco, Long Beach and Oakland.

Waverley House / Ehrlich Yanai Rhee Chaney Architects

© Matthew Millman© Joe Fletcher© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman+ 22

Palo Alto, United States

Tillamook Creamery / Olson Kundig

© Aaron Leitz© Matthew Millman© Aaron Leitz© Aaron Leitz+ 31

Queen’s Lane Pavilion / Carney Logan Burke Architects

© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman+ 36

BO Bartlett Center / Olson Kundig

© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman+ 12

The Austin / Edmonds + Lee Architects

© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman© Matthew Millman+ 22

Touch It, Smell It, Feel It: Architecture for the Senses

Arakawa + Gins' Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York used non-orthogonal geometries, undulating floors, and even isolation pods in their experiments to create architecture's that would "stop ageing." Image via Metropolis Magazine. Image Courtesy of Dimitris Yeros, © 2008 Estate of Madeline Gins, Reproduced with permission of the estate of Madeline Gins
Arakawa + Gins' Bioscleave House in East Hampton, New York used non-orthogonal geometries, undulating floors, and even isolation pods in their experiments to create architecture's that would "stop ageing." Image via Metropolis Magazine. Image Courtesy of Dimitris Yeros, © 2008 Estate of Madeline Gins, Reproduced with permission of the estate of Madeline Gins

This article was originally published on Metropolis Magazine as "Architecture You Can Smell? A Brief History of Multisensory Design."

What comes to mind when you encounter the term “sensory design”? Chances are it is an image: a rain room, a funky eating utensil, a conspicuously textured chair. But the way things actually feel, smell, even taste, is much harder to capture. This difficulty points to how deeply ingrained the tyranny of vision is. Might the other senses be the keys to unlocking broader empirical truths? Does the ocular-centric bias of art, architecture, and design actually preclude a deeper collective experience?