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  1. ArchDaily
  2. Projects
  3. Houses
  4. United States
  5. ZDES
  6. 2015
  7. Shotgun Chameleon / ZDES

Shotgun Chameleon / ZDES

  • 12:00 - 8 February, 2016
Shotgun Chameleon / ZDES
Shotgun Chameleon / ZDES, © Paul Hester
© Paul Hester

© Paul Hester © Paul Hester © Paul Hester © Paul Hester + 24

© Paul Hester
© Paul Hester

Text description provided by the architects. Inspired by Gulf Coast raised shotgun houses and versatility of chameleon skin, Shotgun Chameleon emphasizes programmatic flexibility and response to climate. The chameleon-like front screen element provides a myriad of facade possibilities to adapt this design to different urban contexts and to a variety of solar/wind orientations.  

© Paul Hester
© Paul Hester

Possibilities include wood siding painted to blend with the street-scape, billboards where commercial uses are feasible on the ground floor, louvered wood (vertical or horizontal depending on orientation) to allow for breezes while blocking direct sun and providing privacy, solar panel screen to harvest solar energy, or vine covered screens reminiscent of french quarter balconies.

© Paul Hester
© Paul Hester

The alternating wood slats screen on the sides provides privacy for both residents and the neighbors while allowing sunlight and wind to move through the house (picture Ext 006). Major openings are facing north and south. The south windows frame an ever evolving urban painting (picture Int 002 with crane showing new layer of midtown developing) while north windows frame the four seasons of nature (picture Int 003).

Ground Floor Plan
Ground Floor Plan

Sustainability Consideration:

- Environmental.

The house is designed with cross ventilation in mind. Summer breeze is channeled through the south facing balcony and porch to passively ventilate the house. Angle of roof at balcony is carefully calculated to allow lower winter sunlight to enter the interior spaces (picture Int. 002) while higher summer sunlight stays outside. Darker flooring to harvest warmth from the winter sunlight. The balcony and porch which extend the spaces whenever needed by opening glass sliding doors (Int 001).

© Paul Hester
© Paul Hester

This is done without adding air conditioned space. The choice of renewable wood material, high efficient mechanical equipment (mini split ac units and tankless water heater), dual flush toilet, led lighting, foam insulation and low-e insulated windows (rain harvesting on its way) aim to minimize energy consumption (we are recording the performance of the house, so far the energy savings is very impressive) . 

© Paul Hester
© Paul Hester

- Economy (Life cycle & financial)

Flexibility and adaptability are key to this design. These characters could prolong the life of the house as it can adapt to changes in need. Closing internal stair, the house could become a up & down duplex since each floor is equip with a kitchen and a restroom (for rental or accommodate multi-generational family arrangement) . Tenant on upper floor can use the external stairs. 

© Paul Hester
© Paul Hester

The same setting could also be used as live-work space with the bottom unit as office. Opening the internal stairs, it is a 3 bedrooms and 2 baths house. The renting out option generate income to help offset the cost of mortgage that encourage a moresustainable way of home ownership (current one bedroom apartment rental in the neighborhood range from $1200 to $1800 so renting out the bottom unit could offset the entire monthly mortgage payment). 

© Paul Hester
© Paul Hester

- Equity (social & culture)

The design of the house aim to revisit and celebrate the idea of balcony and porch living which rooted heavily in the vernacular of the neighborhood, Freedmen's Town. The balcony not only provides a great social space for the residents but also encourages interaction with neighbors on sidewalk or across street.

© Paul Hester
© Paul Hester

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About this office
ZDES
Office
Cite: "Shotgun Chameleon / ZDES" 08 Feb 2016. ArchDaily. Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/781611/shotgun-chameleon-zdes/> ISSN 0719-8884
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